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YO MAMA'S FOOD

s
salad man May 28, 2008 05:56 AM

What are your favorite MAMA FOOD memories?

  1. fromagina May 28, 2008 08:00 AM

    My mother was one of those inventive, intuitive cooks who could turn poverty (Dad, after 10 years in the Air Force, back to school on the GI Bill with five children) into culinary delight. I remember her "Tuna Timbales" made with "day old" bread, cheap tuna, onions, celery, sale margarine, and her clever seasonings. She would line muffin tins with margarined bread and fill this with the tuna mixture and bake it into a savory lightness. These elegant little muffin-sized yummies were served with a cream sauce probably made with powdered milk.. but she pulled it off with grace! If the GI Bill check was late and even the powdered milk was gone, we would be served our water with ice in wine glasses.

    When we finally became more prosperous and could have turkey for Thanksgiving again, another enduring memory is helping make the stuffing early in the morning. My reward for chopping onions and celery and slicing melba toast was the deliciously seasoned boiled neck. She and I would lean against the counter gnawing on that delicious neck meat. Good memories..

    2 Replies
    1. re: fromagina
      d
      dolores May 28, 2008 08:06 AM

      I didn't much pay attention to my mother's food, although she could fry and whip up Italian like nobody's business, but her baking? Oh wow.

      Pies - banana cream, apple, coconut custard, chiffon, pecan, lemon meringue; cakes, donuts, an almond paste cream puff confection, profiteroles, cookies galore, ricotta cheesecake, blueberry cheesecake, mousse -- and I wonder why I have sweet teeth?

      1. re: fromagina
        hill food Jun 5, 2008 11:53 PM

        what a cool memories, I look forward to the rest.

      2. mrbozo May 28, 2008 11:12 AM

        I owe my love of eating and cooking to my mother's talent in the kitchen. My parents were poor post-WWII immigrants to Canada so every dollar was stretched until hard work paid off in a modicum of prosperity many years later. But, man, the delicious aromas, and food that truly schmecked.

        2 Replies
        1. re: mrbozo
          s
          salad man May 28, 2008 11:49 AM

          where were they from and what did she make?

          1. re: salad man
            mrbozo May 28, 2008 12:11 PM

            My folks were from Estonia.

            My mother made many German, Estonian and generic East European dishes.: sauerbraten, rouladen, cabbage rolls (both tomato sauce and mushroom sauce versions), pirokas (Estonian perogies which are baked rather than boiled or fried: fillings are numerous but my favourite is ham, egg and onion), borscht, kotelet (pork chop served with mushroom and onion gravy laced with black pepper and rice on the side), the ubiquitous chicken soup (sometimes with ground pork meatballs which were seasoned with cloves and other secret herbs and spices), head cheese (served with the choice of strong mustard, vinegar, or horseradish), kugel, coffee cake, homemade drop doughnuts, trifle, herring 101 ways, smoked herring, mackerel, salmon, or any other suitable fish, potatoes with fresh chopped dill, a spread for coarse dark rye bread made with chopped schmaltz herring sauteed onions and tomato paste, stroganoff, bliny, etc.

        2. kpaumer May 28, 2008 12:16 PM

          My mother is also one of those natural cooks, she learned southern soul food cooking & baking from her mother and haute cuisine from 30 years as a country club waitress. She never eats out anymore, because she knows she can make it better. Sunday it was baked Shad with Cornbread and Edemame succotash. Tonight it is Grilled Lamb Shanks, grilled vegetables, Naan and Tomato & Feta Salad. It is not only her cooking
          but her generosity in what she makes, if she knows you like a certain food and she makes it, then you get a phone call, I live for those calls! I often tease her about "hitting the lottery" while she may never be rich in wealth she has put a smile on many people's face. She has taught me sharing food is just as important as eating it.

          1. d
            Diane in Bexley May 29, 2008 09:26 AM

            I have written about my childhood before on CH, but everytime I have to put together my Mama AND Grandmama. Both were (are? Mama is still alive) Holocaust survivors who experienced real starvation in Europe during the war. Grandma lived with us, shared my room until I was 6 when she re-married and went back to live in Europe. Growing up kosher and of Hungarian background in WASPy central Ohio in the 1960's when everyone was Wonder Bread, Miracle Whip and dinner @ 6 p.m. really made us stand out.

            Mama/Grandma believed in real bakery bread, no Wonder Bread for us. To this day, the smell of warm bread and butter is a trigger to be hungry. They cooked a lot of Jewish Hungarian food - stuffed peppers or cabbage, boiled pickled tongue (wonderful cold with cole slaw & potato salad!), pot roast, brisket, latkes, chicken paprikash (no sour cream, we were kosher!), half sour pickles which Grandma made from scratch in the summer. We picked berries and they made homemade preserves, strudel from apples or sour cherries, honey cake, Hungarian poppyseed coffee cake. From sour cherries, they made their own slivovitz, distilled in 100 proof alchohol, this is wonderful served over pound cake or fruit salad.

            Truly I never felt impoverished, although we didn't have much money. They could take a whole turkey and make it last a week getting roast meat, leftover casserole, soup, etc. They taught me never to waste anything and that you could make something tasty out of just about whatever ingredients were at hand. My father had a business failure while I was in elementary school, I guess we were down to our last $100. My mother, brother & I gathered up all the pop bottles in the neighborhood, you got a few cents for recyclying them. We had collected about $15-20. We went to the grocery store on an "adventure" and had a math lesson from my mother as to what staples we could buy from that money to last the week. This was not during the depression, maybe 1968 or 1970. But, a wonderfully positive attitude to life in general. We reminisce these stories at holidays with my mother and give thanks for the bounty we are now able to enjoy.

            4 Replies
            1. re: Diane in Bexley
              s
              Sean May 29, 2008 11:02 AM

              Chourice, peppers and onions in tomato sauce on a Portuguese roll.

              1. re: Diane in Bexley
                fromagina May 29, 2008 04:12 PM

                Thanks for your lovely memoir of Hungarian Jewish food. I sent it to my 84 year old Hungarian Jewish friend and now we are getting ready to make some pickled tongue! She wonders if you remember pickled cherries?

                1. re: fromagina
                  d
                  Diane in Bexley May 30, 2008 05:50 AM

                  Yes! We pickled cherries. I laugh at the "new" concept of slow food and using the bounty found in your local area because that is how we were taught at home eons ago. There was a rhyme and reason to the growing season, we spent time driving in the country to find farm stands carrying the freshest produce and fruit, then we brought it all home and cooked it up. We home canned veggies until my progressive mother learned how to "quick freeze" them, she scraped up money to buy a huge stand alone freezer into which we poured all our labors of love.

                  Please send me your recipe for pickled tongue, if you can. The Jewish butcher recently closed here and we can't get it any longer. Mother is coming to visit from Florida and we would like to try it as well, unfortunately she no longer remembers how. Thanks!

                  1. re: Diane in Bexley
                    fromagina May 30, 2008 06:51 AM

                    I've sent my friend a bunch of pickled tongue recipes gleaned from the web to check out to see which comes closest to her memory. The pickled tongue my Siberian Jew x Buryat grandfather made is relatively simple.. simmer big fat tongue in water with a few dollops of apple vinegar, palm-full of mustard seed, palm-full of black peppercorns, 2 fat pinches of caraway seeds, 1 pinch of celery seed, a few allspice, a bay leaf, some whole un-peeled cloves of garlic, and a few pinches of kosher salt; Simmer until a skewer poked into the tongue says it's tender. Remove tongue, skin it and trim it (I love the trimmings chopped on a sandwich with homemade mustard and horseradish). Strain cooking liquid and reduce it to about 2 1/2 to 3 cups. Adjust flavor by maybe adding some more vinegar, ground pepper, some grated or prepared horseradish.. your call. Slice the tongue and return it to the hot reduced liquid. Cover and let cool in the liquid. At this point I add slices of red onion and some fresh celery leaves and maybe some sliced garlic. Refrigerate a few days and enjoy!. I'll let you know which recipe my friend chose.

              2. p
                Pincus May 29, 2008 02:22 PM

                Pierogis and cabbage rolls, baby. Mmm, mm, good.

                1. g
                  gryphonskeeper May 29, 2008 02:55 PM

                  My moms home made bread.

                  1. t
                    torty May 29, 2008 03:29 PM

                    Oh so many. The Krapfen (yeast doughnuts) with jam inside and some with money on Fat Tuesday, the vegetable soup with chewy dumplings (she made this every night for 6 months just for me after a horrific break-up), the Schaumrollen (semi-puff pastry tubes with whipped cream), the green beans or peas in a milk roux with a ton of fresh dill, shish-kabob on the electric rotisserie marinated with something wonderful she learned in classes from Southern California Edison (they also were the source of her great tangy hot bacon dressing for spinach salad and her cheese fondue)- oh my the list could go on forever- pumpkin bread, honey-nut drops, baklava (learned from a Jordanian woman in the hood)....... then lasagna and spaghetti learned from another woman, and for a time those frozen veggies (carrots/peas/corn/lima?) cooked and tossed with margarine (the frugal WW2 cuisine mentality) and green can parmesan- oh and the Dr. Oetker brownie like squares with cherries (remember eating them at a Lakers game with my dad when Pat Riley and Jerry West were playing...)- thanks for prompting the memories

                    1. s
                      spellweaver16 May 31, 2008 04:40 AM

                      I have great childhood memories at both my grandmothers' houses. My paternal granny's house always smelled like yeast and cinnamon and she was a phenomenal baker. Cinnamon rolls, yeast bread, date bread, apple cake, and my absolute favorites were her homemade beef and noodles and porcupine meatballs. Beef and noodles were for special occasions, and porcupine meatballs could be whipped up for me whenever I was visiting. My maternal grandma grew up on a farm, lots of hearty food...fried chicken, pork chops, and she did a lot of home canning too. She picked blackberries for blackberry jam, beets for pickled beets, apples for apple butter, and canned everything else fresh she could get her hands on. Breakfast at her house on the weekends was always eggs, perfectly over easy with lots of pepper, bacon, and toast. I have lots of fond memories of them both! Granny passed away, but grandma is still alive and kickin', which I'm very grateful for.

                      1. nofunlatte May 31, 2008 01:06 PM

                        My mom's cooking was, sadly, anti-chow: Spaghettios, beefaroni, Hamburger Helper, the dreaded late-60s early-70s Weight Watchers "pizza"' (a piece of dry bread with a slice of American cheese and oregano!), canned white potatoes (oh, canned *anything*). She did not like to cook. These American convenience foods (my folks are German immigrants) were just the ticket for her! However, she DID make a fabulous pound cake, which sank just a little bit in the middle. We kids loved that!--okay,we loved the spaghettios, too! Very basic cake--flour butter sugar eggs vanilla. And she now makes a wonderful apple cake. She did enjoy baking a bit, but cooking, well, that was a different story. My dad did the cooking on the big holidays (and he was/is quite good!)

                        In Mom's defense, she DID love to clean and we had a spotless house. And I really appreciate that now, since, as an adult, I know how difficult that is. And she was perfectly content to do the holiday dishes (no dishwasher) with Dad cooking.

                        And she happily enjoys my cooking! Too bad she and Dad are 600 miles away, or she'd enjoy it more often! I love my Mom!

                        3 Replies
                        1. re: nofunlatte
                          s
                          SharaMcG May 31, 2008 01:23 PM

                          My mom is a depression-era child and saw the "convenience" of canned and frozen everything as a great modern way to live, but she could cook from scratch when she was in the mood to do so. She made wonderful apple cake, blintzes and kugle, chopped liver and kasha varnishka. My grandmother was a great baker and I still remember watching her make her own phyllo for strudel. She'd stretch the dough so thin it covered her kitchen table.

                          1. re: SharaMcG
                            d
                            Diane in Bexley Jun 2, 2008 08:31 AM

                            Shara, as I mentioned in my thread, growing up in a Hungarian Jewish home, we made plenty of strudel. Wish I had paid more attention as Grandma and Mom could also stretch the dough so thin you could read a newspaper underneth it. We had a huge 1/2 sheet pan they would lay the strudel on in the shape of a horseshoe, never see that anymore. Alas, it's prepackaged frozen phyllo sheets for me!

                          2. re: nofunlatte
                            j
                            jenniegirl May 31, 2008 08:20 PM

                            I thought I was the only person who fondly remembers a dinner of Spaghetti-O's. There were seven kids in our family, and eventually for the last two, dinner was "on your own" or cereal. My youngest sister loves to hear about when mom used to "cook" before we had a microwave. She did used to make these weight watcher "turkey burgers" and something called Joe's Special which was hamburger, canned mushrooms, eggs, spinach, and covered with catsup and green canned parmesan. She also made this thing called Mexican salad-beef and catalina dressing with sour cream and fritos. Birthday fare! Usually we had kraft mac and cheese or dinty moore stew. She could make this fabulous rum cake for potlucks though. When I was in high school, I kind of took over as family cook (maybe it was more like sixth grade!)-and she never looked back. She hated cooking-but I still remember how nice it was to sit around the table with all of us, even if it was kraft mac and cheese with canned green beans stirred in for good measure!

                          3. s
                            saticoy May 31, 2008 01:35 PM

                            This struck a chord - I also have to lump my mom and her mom in together. My grandmother made sofrito, the base for so much Puerto Rican cooking, and she wrote the recipe on a bank envelope for me probably 25 years ago, but mom and I used to get our sofrito from her freezer. She passed away a few years ago, and I moved far away from my mom, who gamely filled my freezer once. I finally got the gumption up to make my own - a very potent experience, trying to figure out how to get the same consistency and flavor, and building all the different ingredients in the pan. The crazy thing was, when I was done, I left the house to go get the mail, and when I walked back in, the aroma of finished sofrito hit me (I guess I had been so absorbed in the process I didn't pay attention) and transported me back to my grandmother's kitchen, and my mothers'...I cried a little, but I'm so happy I got the recipe right and I can taste and smell this family treasure, and hopefully pass it along, too.

                            6 Replies
                            1. re: saticoy
                              Catskillgirl May 31, 2008 02:01 PM

                              Isn't that the most rewarding experience? I tried for years to duplicate my mother's manicotti - she was Irish but loved cooking Italian red-sauce dishes. One day I finally got really close, and I cried too. I just hated the idea of her version being gone forever. She and my grandmother were both wonderful cooks, but secritive with their recipes. When we'd beg them to write down a recipe, they always seemed to forget one vital ingredient "by accident." And they never measured anything! I wish I had their experience and skill.

                              1. re: Catskillgirl
                                fromagina May 31, 2008 03:00 PM

                                My mama made what we thought of as The World's Best Potato Salad and after she was gone, none of her 6 kids could quite "get" it. Our spud salads always fell short by missing a certain "zing" that her's had. One day I was steaming the spuds for the salad and I said out loud "Mama! Why doesn't my potato salad taste as good as yours did!?!" Suddenly the kitchen was filled with the scent of hot vinegar.. OF COURSE! I remembered that she used to sprinkle vinegar over the hot potatoes before they cooled. Since then my potato salad has come a lot closer to her Gold Standard. Heck.. it might even be as good as her's now, but memories always taste better! Thanks for the tip, Ma.

                                1. re: fromagina
                                  crosby_p Jun 6, 2008 05:06 AM

                                  fromagina...MY Mom's potato salad was the best!!! ;)
                                  What a great thread! My Mom wasn't inventive but loved to entertain and have people over for dinner and cocktails. Her potato salad was just potatoes, mayo (always Hellmans, I now use Kraft) onion, black pepper and celery salt. I still make it that way! Some of the things she made are my go-to comfort foods now that she's been gone 12 years...pork chops, carrots and potatoes in mushroom soup. She made a wonderful "company" chicken dish with sauternes, green peppers, mushrooms that I still make today. After she died I kept remembering this wonderful one dish meal she made with ham that she called a "New England Boiled Dinner" . I tried to make it many times, but the ham was just wrong. I finally bought one of those Freirich Pork Butts and voila....that was it! The other standout Doris made was meringue cookies. They were like white crunchy clouds with chocolate chips and pecans inside. I haven't tried to make them as I am a VERY bad baker...but maybe some day!
                                  A cute story...she wasn't much of a drinker but discovered those bottled daiquiris and decided to serve them at a dinner party. I was out with friends but heard the story when I returned home from my Dad. Evidently, Doris had cooked the whole meal, set a beautiful table, and sat down to daiquiris with her guests. She went into the kitchen to refresh her drink, and kept on walking straight into my bedroom and onto my bed...out like a light! She was SOOO embarassed!

                                  1. re: fromagina
                                    crosby_p Jun 6, 2008 05:10 AM

                                    fromagina...MY Mom's potato salad was the best!!! ;)
                                    What a great thread! My Mom was from the New Bedford Massachusetts area. She wasn't inventive but loved to entertain and have people over for dinner and cocktails. Her potato salad was just potatoes, mayo (always Hellmans, I now use Kraft) onion, black pepper and celery salt. I still make it that way! She was also a great fan of chorizo which she called "shareece" and kielbasa fried up with onions. Some of the things she made are my go-to comfort foods now that she's been gone 12 years...pork chops, carrots and potatoes in mushroom soup. She made a wonderful "company" chicken dish with sauternes, green peppers, mushrooms that I still make today. After she died I kept remembering this wonderful one dish meal she made with ham that she called a "New England Boiled Dinner" . I tried to make it many times, but the ham was just wrong. I finally bought one of those Freirich Pork Butts and voila....that was it! The other standout Doris made was meringue cookies. They were like white crunchy clouds with chocolate chips and pecans inside. I haven't tried to make them as I am a VERY bad baker...but maybe some day!
                                    A cute story...she wasn't much of a drinker but discovered those bottled daiquiris and decided to serve them at a dinner party. I was out with friends but heard the story when I returned home from my Dad. Evidently, Doris had cooked the whole meal, set a beautiful table, and sat down to daiquiris with her guests. She went into the kitchen to refresh her drink, and kept on walking straight into my bedroom and onto my bed...out like a light! She was SOOO embarassed!

                                    1. re: crosby_p
                                      f
                                      flavrmeistr Jun 6, 2008 06:10 AM

                                      My mom made potato salad with garlic pickles and olives, Hellmann's and sweet onions. A little of the pickle brine added in made it excellent, especially if chilled overnight.I still make it that way

                                  2. re: Catskillgirl
                                    s
                                    SharaMcG Jun 1, 2008 08:15 AM

                                    That's a lovely sentiment, Catskillsgirl. I had a similar experience when I taught myself how to make my mom's vegetable soup, which has a distinctive aroma and flavor from a grated sweet potato (also thickens the soup). I got all teary the first time I got it right. My mom is 1,000 miles away from me now, but that aroma made it feel like I was in her kitchen again.

                                2. thew May 31, 2008 04:25 PM

                                  my mother worked 16 hour days as a doctor
                                  she was no cook

                                  but - her potato soup is my quintessential comfort food

                                  1. Emme Jun 1, 2008 01:09 AM

                                    My mom was certainly not the cook, that would be me. Nor was my second mother (nanny).

                                    From my mother, I recall her making and enjoying salmon croquettes, turkey meatloaf, sweet'n'sour turkey cabbage, chicken divan, and reservations.

                                    From my nanny, broccoli, lima beans, noodles, separately but mixed with butter and parmesan. Tomato and cheese slices drizzled with Italian dressing. And of course rice cakes topped either w/ apple butter or apricot jam.

                                    3 Replies
                                    1. re: Emme
                                      b
                                      bubbles4me Jun 1, 2008 08:51 AM

                                      My Mom's roast beef! We had it once a week, it was slow cooked to a perfect medium rare with a thick slab of salty fat across the top....try as I might I just cant re-create it, although I think part of the reason is I cant seem to find the exact cut of beef she used to buy....almost shaped like a triangle with a thick layer of snowy white fat acroos the top....they probably whack that off now in an effort to keep things lean....might be why mine never taste quite as good.

                                      1. re: bubbles4me
                                        fromagina Jun 1, 2008 09:16 AM

                                        Could that have been a tri-tip? That's what we call it out in CA. It's the piece from which coulotte steaks are cut. We love it roasted or slow grilled.

                                        1. re: fromagina
                                          b
                                          bubbles4me Jun 3, 2008 11:04 AM

                                          Nope not tri-tip although we do make that all the time (LA girl here) have not seen the cut in years and cant recall what it was called.

                                    2. l
                                      laliz Jun 2, 2008 10:11 AM

                                      My Mom was not a cook, but she did have some specialties. Stuffed pork chops w/scalloped potatoes; creamed peas on toast (so help me God); and creamed (canned} salmon on mashed potatoes served with canned creamed corn. (as a kid I adored it)

                                      She made the best pot roast too, I've never been able to duplicate.

                                      She made stuff I hated too, liver w/onions, fried green tomatoes, canned butter beans, (canned) salmon patties.

                                      My mother worked and we ate a lot of TV Dinners, Kraft Mac n Cheese dinner, Chef Boy ar Dee Spaghetti Dinner (had that a lot)

                                      1. Passadumkeg Jun 2, 2008 10:48 AM

                                        Mom's kapusta (saurkraut), pork ribs and kolbasi with mash potatoes is still my favorite. My kids love it when I make it today. Mom taught and went to night school. She started to teach me to cook week night dinners starting in the 5th grade. I feel my love of cooking stems from this early role with in the family. I also loved her potato pancakes, fish and verischaka during lent. Her stuffed veal roasts and leg of lamb wre excellent too. I have fond memories of her fried chicken. From early childhood she would take me into NYC to French restaurants and the opera and to Princeton for Shakespeare and more French restaurants. Not bad for a coal miner's daughter. She at 92, is an adventerous eater, from Thai, Mexican, Viet, Turkish, she loves them all!

                                        1. Scargod Jun 3, 2008 04:46 AM

                                          My Mom's biscuits, fried chicken and chicken with dumplings instantly come to mind. The thing is, my mom was a country girl, now in the big city. She adapted fairly quickly and a few meals were adventurous and creative but she did country food oh so well....

                                          Marco and I have some amazing similarities. I started cooking alone when I was nine. I was "head cook" out of five kids. I burnt a lot of stuff at first on our gas stove. I had to run outside with a lot of stuff and then air out the house (no vent hood). Thank God we had copper-coated Revere cookwear, though it did occasionally get warped!
                                          My Mom had to work to support us so we were left alone afer school, which is totally NOT PC nowdays, for two-four hours till she got home. She taught us how to cook and she "cooked by wire"; that is, she talked us through preparing meals over the phone.
                                          It's fun when my son calls and I do the same with him. Makes me misty-eyed.

                                          3 Replies
                                          1. re: Scargod
                                            Passadumkeg Jun 3, 2008 05:23 AM

                                            Yup, mom is quite a gal! At breakfast, she'd line out the food and tell me what to do w/ it for supper. Pamela calls me from HEBs in Austin as to what to buy and how to cook it. David, in Korea is an accomplished cook and sends me Korean foods, Michael, in Costa Rica, is/was a chef, Scott is a vegetarian and made some egg washed panzarrotti last night and Brian, the 18 yr old, said when he was 10, "I'm becoming a herring gourmet." Sorry about the pappa braggin', ya'all.

                                            1. re: Scargod
                                              fromagina Jun 3, 2008 09:02 AM

                                              I like that! "Cooked by wire"! I'm the eldest of a big brood of kids that had a working mama, and I learned to make pot roast, stews, spaghetti sauce (I won't call it "pasta sauce"), and meatloaf at a very early age.. and yes.. there were those phone calls! I have friends whose mothers didn't allow them in the kitchen; poor things took years to learn to feed themselves. Thanks Mom.

                                              1. re: fromagina
                                                l
                                                link_930 Jun 4, 2008 03:25 PM

                                                Cooking by wire -- my mother did that as well. That's what I call proper parenting!

                                            2. f
                                              flavrmeistr Jun 3, 2008 10:58 AM

                                              Even with groing up on a farm and having six kids, my mother never learned how to fry an egg properly. But she made excellent little flat biscuits that were great with honey or apple butter. Kinda like thick piecrust. Also excellent donuts, fried in lard with sugar and cinnamon. Real chocolate cake from baker's chocolate and homemade peach ice cream. Man....

                                              1. lulubelle Jun 4, 2008 01:12 AM

                                                Thick Pancake. It's Swedish I think, and kind of like a 9x13 pan of popovers served with either lingonberries or apple sauce. It was the go to meal if we were broke or she hadn't been to the grocery store.

                                                My mom wasn't a great cook, but there was always a pot of soup on the stove on a wintery Saturday, and she baked great coffee cakes and muffins.

                                                3 Replies
                                                1. re: lulubelle
                                                  f
                                                  flavrmeistr Jun 4, 2008 07:23 AM

                                                  My dad would make Swedish pancakes with friut or jam, which he called "roll-mops". Also, potato pancakes with a chunk of salt pork. My mom was great with soups, but my dad made a killer hot chili-mac. Only when my mom wasn't around, though, as she considered anything with hot peppers "unwholesome". Us kids loved it all the more because we felt like we were getting away with something.

                                                  1. re: lulubelle
                                                    fromagina Jun 4, 2008 08:04 AM

                                                    Was that maybe a Dutch Baby? Eggs, milk, and flour and it puffs up and cracks? My dad's "Swedish" pancakes were as thin as a crepe and we had them with butter, powdered sugar, and lemon juice.

                                                    1. re: fromagina
                                                      lulubelle Jun 5, 2008 11:23 PM

                                                      No, we have "Swedish pancakes" that are like crepes as well, only we rolled them up with apple sauce. Thick pancake is not like a Dutch Baby either, it's soft and dense. Like a popover. I found this online, it's probably similar. http://www.recipezaar.com/4643

                                                  2. tatamagouche Jun 4, 2008 12:16 PM

                                                    Grasshopper pie for the holidays. Creme de menthe filling seemed so sophisticated to me.

                                                    1. Johnresa Jun 5, 2008 10:27 AM

                                                      My grandMAMA made the best food ever. I remember cooking with her as a kid and just being mesmerized by all that she cooked on a Sunday. We normally had 2-3 meats, 6-7 veggies, and 4-5 carbs. Keep in mind only 7 of us were even there on Sundays and 3 of us were children.

                                                      1. m
                                                        morwen Jun 6, 2008 07:08 AM

                                                        When my mom left the farm she never looked back. If it came in a can, box or from the freezer section it was great. So it was trips to gramma's and grampa's that rocked or holiday dinners with aunts, uncles and cousins, or the once a year family potluck reunions (all the relatives best stuff in one place in abundance, yum!). In high school I started cooking for myself, calling aunts for their recipes, having dinner parties for friends when my parents were on vacations. But what eluded me for the longest time was grampa's soft, fragrant, cake-like molasses cookies with shiny egg-washed tops. Nobody had the recipe after he died. When my mother died, I confiscated her collection of (mostly) unused church cookbooks. While flipping through them one day a yellowed, tattered page fell out and there, in faded pencil in my grampa's handwriting, was the lost molasses cookie recipe! I immediately mixed it up and turned out literally scads of childhood memories and cookies. Turns out it was definitely a farm recipe meant for providing enough cookies for the family of seven kids, adults and all the farm help gramma and grampa fed on a regular basis!

                                                        1 Reply
                                                        1. re: morwen
                                                          s
                                                          salad man Jun 29, 2008 10:06 PM

                                                          Thanks for all the responses to my question about "YO MAMA' S FOOD'

                                                          Some of them were quite poignant,especially the ones that reminded me of my
                                                          own Hungarian,Jewish Mom. I was lucky enough to learn to make her stuffed cabbage, before she died in 1976.

                                                          Every time I cook up a batch I'm right back with her, my Dad, and my Brother--
                                                          all gone now. Funny what food does for memory.

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