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Mango crisp: a modest failure

j
Joebob May 20, 2008 07:30 PM

Why not use mangoes instead of peaches in a peach crisp recipe, I thought. Well, it comes out OK, but it is TOO SWEET, at least for my taste. On the other hand, if you like eating candy with a spoon, it might be your cup of tea. Just layer slices (used Ataulfo variety, hoping for some sourness) in a dish, cover with strussel, bake at 375F for 45 min. and voila!

  1. toutefrite May 20, 2008 09:44 PM

    Love the title of your post. Out of curiosity, what was the texture of the mango like once baked?

    1 Reply
    1. re: toutefrite
      j
      Joebob May 21, 2008 12:45 AM

      They stayed firm, I think because they gave up water as they cooked. The end result was like when one candys orange peel.

    2. h
      HLing May 20, 2008 10:37 PM

      "...Why not use mangoes instead of peaches in a peach crisp recipe, I thought...."

      Mine was, "why not use mangoes instead of apples in a Apple Tarte Tatin recipe ?" The modest failure turned into modest success in 2 days as the tarte had time to mellow in the fridge, with the crust soaking up the rich gooey mango butter. It went from almost inedible the first day, to intensely rich and caramelized candied fruit with the buttery crust. Time heals in cases like this.

       
      5 Replies
      1. re: HLing
        j
        Joebob May 21, 2008 12:53 AM

        We made it in a 10" round pie pan, so we couldn't eat more than a small fraction at any one time. After a couple of days, the topping became softer, which improved the dish on the whole, but it still was VERY SWEET. About as sweet as baklava...Hummm. I wonder how mango slices would be rolled in several layers of filo dough, brushed with butter, and baked?

        1. re: Joebob
          h
          HLing May 21, 2008 05:51 PM

          The mango slices in my tarte tatin were exremely caramelized, therefore the sweetness balanced well in producing a chewy butter scotch-ish taste that's no longer just fruity.

          1. re: HLing
            j
            Joebob May 21, 2008 06:19 PM

            How long and what temp. did you bake at?

            1. re: Joebob
              h
              HLing May 21, 2008 07:08 PM

              I cooked it on stove top in a cast iron for a while before putting on the crust and baking it in the oven at 450 for 25 + minutes. I don't like pale limp apples slices in apple pies, so I've always used this version of the Tarte Tatin recipe. ...but perhaps then this belongs not to this thread on crisps.

              1. re: HLing
                j
                Joebob May 21, 2008 07:47 PM

                The stove-top cooking explains the caremelization, doesn't it. Interesting idea!

      2. k
        kalidaemon May 21, 2008 03:00 PM

        How much sugar did you add? Mangoes are sweet enough on their own so you probably don't need much, if any. Also, did you add lemon or lime to offset the sweetness? You've inspired me try this because I'm a huge mango and crisp fan.

        1 Reply
        1. re: kalidaemon
          j
          Joebob May 21, 2008 06:18 PM

          The topping was 1 C flour 1 C sugar, 1/4 lb butter, 1/2 t cinnamon, and 1/4 t salt, but no sugar was added to the slices from 3 large mangoes. I thought of adding lime juice, but I hoped that using Ataulfo mangoes would provide enough sourness. I think the ones I bought were very ripe, but they weren't wrinkled at all. If you love mangoes and crisp, this may de-sock you.

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