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Easy to eat, low sodium, and tasty soup recipes?

A close family friend is in the hospital, and is now getting to eat real food after a few weeks of no food. He needs soups on the thick side (no chicken noodle, for example) and blended, but very low sodium (and probably not so high fat either). I'm making a pot of potato leek soup, any other suggestions for something that is good and nutrious, and tasty without the salt? I have a hand blender and a food mill, so pureeing anything won't be a problem. Thanks for any help that you can give me.

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  1. Just leave out the salt and do what you can to otherwise intensify the flavors. Caramalize onions, roast vegatables and bones for the stock, deglaze the pans, reduce the stock more than you' re used too. Use the freshest ingredients possible. Your efforts will be appreciated. The longer I go without salt or just a very little salt, the less I miss it. Many times I now think something is perfect yet may campanions need to add salt. Good luck.

    1. I do 99% of all my cooking without salt. In my opinion it takes time to develop a taste for no salt items. Can he use salt substitute? I make cream of broccoli soup without added salt. It is basically the same recipe for potato and leek soup, just substitute the broccoli for the potatoes. I think if you cook up some onions in a little EVOO that helps the soups taste You could also substitute asparagus, carrots, pretty much whatever veggie they like. homemade tomato soup is good too. you can make it as thick or thin as you like and try using fire roasted tomatoes or even roast your own with just a bit of olive oil, cook them at 400 till they are charred around the edges. I would also roast the onions. Since I have been on a low sodium diet I experimented with tons of different spices to add kick.

      Another good choice would be veggie chili. once again I would roast the veggies. Do they like red peppers? You could do a roasted red pepper soup. Or how about homemade cream of chicken or mushroom soup? One of my favorites is french onion soup but I make mine very thick. I just use more cornstarch to thicken to my liking. use sweeter onions for a better flavor. I hope I have given you some good suggestions and if you need any of my recipes please let me know. I wish your friend a speedy recovery

      2 Replies
      1. re: Smileelisa

        Hmm, that cream of broccoli soup sounds great, does it use a lot of cream? I don't think that veggie chili would work, because right now it needs to be something that can be eaten through a straw (so bisque like thick soups are good), but nothing too thin and brothy. Roasted red pepper soup is a great idea, I love roasted red peppers -- do you have a recipe?

        1. re: JasmineG

          I cook the broccoli in homemade chicken stock, then drain and use the stock to make a rioux. I usually make it thicker as I like thick soup. then an immulsion blender to blend up the broccoli or you could use a reg blender and puree it totally. I like texture but if he can't have the chunks right now then the blender would be great to use. My stock is made without any salt. I use some salt free seasoning instead.

          Heat and enjoy!

      2. carrot & sweet potato puree [maybe with a little ginger if he's up for a bit of a kick]. if you roast the veggies first you'll bring out the natural sweetness, and can just add a pinch of kosher salt to balance it.

        1 Reply
        1. re: goodhealthgourmet

          Great idea, thanks!

        2. I couldn't believe how delish my latest soup was: I had roasted a bunch of diff. vegies in just lil oil, pepper and this new Sea Shakes (healthy very low sodium). Vegies were brocolli, garlic, carrots, cherry tomatoes, red pepper, a few small peppers (nothing hot though). Then I threw them and low sodium chx stock in a blender til very smooth, added some seasoning being careful not salt. Then (get this) I wanted more of a creamy type of base and didn't want to use cream, I put in some 2% cottage cheese, blended it up more. Fantastic. I did add a squirt of hot sauce (Sriracha) for zip. Couldn't believe how awesome this was. I'm trying to reduce my salt/sodium and any msg.

          Found this great healthy low sodium salt (from organic seaweed):http://www.injoynow.com/seashakes/ind...

          1. Soups made from roasted squashes always make me happy. It's more of a technique than and actual recipe, but I usually get about 2-3 lbs of squash (butternut, acorn, kabocha, etc) hack them in half and scoop out any seeds. Then I brush with a little olive oil, and put them in the oven skin side down in a foil lined casserole dish. Roast them at 400 for at least an hour, hour and a half, until they're carmelized and super soft. The I set them aside to cool.

            The they're cool enough to handle, I simply scoop out the flesh with a big spoon into a big bowl, add trader joe's low sodium chicken broth, and blend it with an immersion blender, adding broth till i get the consistency i like. I finish it off with a touch of cream, and whatever spice combo I feel like that day (fresh thyme and sage, or roasted garlic, or nutmeg and ginger, etc etc)

            1 Reply
            1. re: bex109

              Me too. Kabocha finished with a touch of coconut milk is nice (with SE Asian seasoning like ginger, tamarind, etc.

            2. Actually, chicken noodle blended so that the noodles thicken the pureed soup might work (if you can make it suitably low in sodium and still tasty).

              Would a nice blended cold gazpacho be appealing to him at this stage? The vinegar tang helps to reduce the need for salt.

              Also, what about making a typical pot roast, with carrots onions and potatoes, and then blending the carrots onions and potatoes with some of the beef broth to make a nice flavored thick soup? (You might need to leave the actual meat out for textures sake)

              Inquire if potassium is an issue for him, because the fake salt is potassium chloride. It can add back the flavor of salt (its a little more bitter), but depending on his medical condition it could be beneficial to add or quite detrimental (eg in kidney failure).

              1 Reply
              1. re: Mellicita

                Yes Mellicita is absolutely correct. I do not use salt nor salt substitues due to kidney failure. I never did care for the taste of fake salt anyway. I agree it it bitter and leaves a bad aftertaste. It took me awhile to actually enjoy the taste of food without salt. You can actually taste the food and I learned really fast to enjoy using herbs and spices. Eating out is actually too salty for me as they all overdose the food with salt. I found that eating fast food now tastes way too salty whereas before I would add additional salt to my food. I think tho after a few weeks of no food that even cardboard is going to taste good to him!

              2. Homemade borscht served with a dollop of sour cream.