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Pork Fish recipes?

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The farm where I get all my meat sells a cut of pork that they call pork fish, which I think is basically the very tail end of the tenderloin. It's quite skinny with a pointy end. I usually use tenderloin recipes and adapt for it being so much smaller, but I was wondering if anyone else has found any recipes specifically for this cut of pork?

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  1. There is no cut of pork recognized by the North American Meat Processors Association as "Pork Fish".....Why don't you ask this "creative" farmer what real cut of pork this is coming from....You are probably correct in assuming it is the tail end of the tenderloin, and any recipes for that cut would/will work as you know....That being said, I like to make K-Bobs out of tenderloin...especially good with pineapple chunks, and glazed with brown sugar and pineapple juice....

    Enjoy!

    1. I'll Third the assumption that it's the trim of the tapered end of the tenderloin fillet. Creative on the part of the butcher, but hopefully you're getting it for at least 30% discount off the price of the full-bodied tenderloin, since you are sacrificing versatility.

      Since the shape of the trimming is set, I could see pounding the larger part down to produce a triangle, then bread and fry as in pork tenderloin sandwiches, served on matching triangles of toast as a finger sandwich. With your creative butcher's approval, and what he dealt you, you could "see" his nomenclature, and then raise him one, and call them "Fish o' Filet Sandwiches".

      1. It's quite amazing that this farmer actually told you about or sold you what is called "the fish". It's not a term you hear often today, mostly used by old timers and veteran butchers. The fist time I heard it was in Indiana from a hog farmer and he wouldn't tell me where it was until I butchered a hog with him. The farmer is not being "creative". there is actually a "cut" called the fish, but it's usually a pretty small piece of meat. It's very tender and usually doesn't have to be cut off but rather easily pulled off (at least in my experience). As to where it comes from, I will keep my promise and not tell secrets. As for recipes, I've baked, smoked, grilled, and done almost everything else with it. Congrats on finding someone to sell it, but don't pay gobs of cash for it.

        1. The cut of pork the farmer calls"fish" is actually the true tenderloins and are much smaller than the larger pork loin that comes from each side of the backbone, and is almost always mistakingly referred to as the tenderloin. They are two(2) different cuts or parts of the pig. The FISH are located inside the body cavity near the junction of the hams and backbone one to each side.

          1. Having been a meatcutter for 14 years, I can tell you that pork fish does exist and is the best part of the hog. Any farmer or meatcutter will agree. Most people don't know they're eating it when they have pork chops w/ the loin piece. That is part of the fish. Almost every recipe you see on these recipe sites are calling it the tenderloin when infact, that is the center loin. (Your basic pork chop or loin roast.) The pork fish IS the true tenderloin. The best way to way to deal with the uneven thickness is to fold the narrow end in and tie it to itself. Most grocery stores sell the pork fish vacuum sealed. Usually another brand than the store you're at. They weigh anywhere from 1 pound to 4 pounds. They're like butter. You'll never go back to the center loin. Your welcome.

            1 Reply
            1. re: frankpflynn

              It's what the beef filet is to a cow. Just on a pig.

            2. This reminds me of a cut of beef in a sandwich I used to get years and years ago --- a "fingerling steak" sandwich. The description was similar, a long thinnish strip of meat, looking like a fish filet. Very tender, served as a sandwich at a roadside place, the only place I ever saw it.
              This was on the road from Long Island up to Wellesley, MA, before the interstates (gives you an idea how long ago, in the 1950's).
              The place called itself, Fingerling Steak, or something like that. I've always wanted to find it again, but haven't ever succeeded in finding out anything more. Just off chance, people here good at researching obscure cuts of meat --- maybe someone knows??????