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Bread bakers: do you weigh your ingredients?

I weigh all my ingredients, including the wet ingredients.
Had a friend that was telling me you should only weigh the dry ingredients and do the wet ingredients (water etc) by volume in a beaker.

What is your take on it?

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  1. I weigh the flour, use a measuring spoon for yeast/salt etc and a measuring jug for the water. All were provided with my breadmaker. Never had a duff loaf yet.

    1. I can't think of any reason not to do liquids by weight, assuming you know the weight of the liquids. I always do water by weight (and have recently been adding beer as well) with no problems. But I'm not the most experienced bread baker in the world.

      1. I think the reason to weigh dry ingredients is that their volume can vary quite a bit, as you can tell when trying to get a level cup of flour--you could probably fill a one cup measure and then pack in 1/2 cup more flour pretty easily. If I'm remembering my chemistry correctly (and it wasn't my best subject to begin with) the volume of water is pretty constant. So volume is a much more reliable measurement for water than for dry ingredients. But if it's easy for you to weigh the water, you're not going to be hurting anything.

        1. Hi,

          Took a bread making class. We weighted the flour and also took it's temperture. The temperture determined the temperture of the water. The flour weight varies depending on how dry the flour is.

          For the yeast, used a teaspoon since we were using dry yeast granules. We used measuring cup for wet ingredients.

          1. I don't think it matters whether you weigh or measure liquids since it's consistent, as Nettie says (try to make 8 oz of water more or less in a cup like you can with flour). But, overall, I go for feel because on some days, I need to add more flour when I'm kneading--the weather is so variable with humidity and I think that makes the difference.