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the breath of dragon?

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Anybody watched the Andrew Zimmern show last night? Didn't he say "the breath of dragon" twice?
I never heard of this term - shouldn't it be "the breath of wok"? Is that a less known translation of "wok hay" or it's something else (not likely in the context) or he plainly made a mistake.
I am guessing he made a mistake but don't want to jump to conclusion right away - there are always things I don't know.
BTW, otherwise, it was a great show last night. I missed Guangzhou altogether when I had lay over last month. Big mistake!

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  1. I was thinking exactly the same thing when I watched that show last week - I think he was trying to refer to "wok hei" but it came out as "breath of the dragon" instead which baffled me as well when I heard it, as that was the first time I had ever heard of that as well. Maybe BOTD means "wok hei" or "wok power/fire" - not sure - but something might have been lost or added in translation by the time he uttered the phrase "BOTD" on the air. But it most likely is "wok hei" since he was referring to some char marks on some vegetable or meat that had come out of the wok - which is exactly what "wok hei" is supposed to impart on the food.

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    1. re: FoodCad

      If there was really such a "translation" called "BOTD", there would have been a Cantonese phrase called "long hay". :-)
      Also, I disagree with him in that "wok hay" is a "kitchen lingo". I had a restaurant before but customers(Cantonese) constantly use this term to praise (or blame, as when there is no wok hay :-) ) us. I like to watch HK soap operas, and this term is used constantly by "commoners".
      Stir fry in my opinion is the highest form of cooking. It's a shame that in the states, where people almost equate stir fry to Chinese food, we constantly get half cold mushy meats mixed with grease. It's a perfect example of lacking "wok hay".