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Are Best Fuzhou And Rong Hang Related?

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The extensive menus of both these Eldridge st. are nearly the same. Is the ownership same also?

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  1. i was going to post to ask if anyone had eaten at Rong Hang, i noticed it the other night walking from super taste and it looked interesting

    4 Replies
    1. re: Lau

      I ate there today. I got the Pan Fried Noodles w/Pork, which was quite good. It was made with thin rice noodles and had a decent amount of egg mixed in with 1 1/2" to 2" slivers of pork and similarly sized bits of bok choy. The menu is almost identical (in content and design) to Best Fuzhou. However, I will say that the waitress at Best Fuzhou kept trying to get me to order a bunch of expensive items (even though I was having lunch by myself), and at Rong Hang, the waitress turned my menu over to the noodle and rice section, which has the cheap one-plate meals, which I appreciated.

      For some reason, at every Fujian place I've been to, everyone is drinking Heineken. It is unreal. I've never seen people agree so much on what to drink. Just for kicks (since literally everyone else in the restaurant was drinking a Heineken), I got one too. Damn, I'm still not a fan, but I just had to see what all the fuss was about.

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      http://foodstalker.com

      1. re: androidland

        I ate at Rong Hang last night with a small group. We had an outstanding fish fillet dish and some very good, subtle soup (unfortunately I don't remember what kind). But the other dishes we tried were mediocre and bland. We got the lychee pork, which had no obvious evidence of lychee and tasted like a boring Americanized takeout dish from Anywhere, USA, and a thin noodle dish with egg and bok choy and very bad-tasting oysters. And, as Androidland noted, everybody was drinking Heineken (except us). As you'd expect given the economic status of the Fujianese target audience, it was dirt cheap, at only about $10-$11 per person for our group, so that's a good bargain even in Chinatown.

        I saw some interesting-looking dishes on other tables, including a dish of peanuts and fried battered something-or-other (possibly peppers), and some kind of tasty-looking small snails or shellfish. I might go back just to try those dishes and to get that fish fillet dish again, if I can figure out which one it was (I didn't do the ordering last night), but I wonder if there's better Fujianese food overall elsewhere. The write-ups on Ah Ping make it sound really promising, but it's so small.

        1. re: Ike

          Same owners here as Best Fuzhou up the street with the exact same menu. Lychee Pork is a Fujian classic that has no lychees in it whatsoever. It's the Fujian version of sweet and sour pork - the pork is cut to resemble lychees hence the name. Best Fuzhou at 68 Forsyth Street has the best version IMO and the taste is closer to the sour side of sweet and sour but their menu is in Chinese only.

          http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/483902

          1. re: Ike

            Have had a couple meals at Ah Ping and it really is great. The items mentioned in Jim's post are excellent. I also had the lychee pork there once(they wouldn't serve me most of the other items the first time as they seemed nervous as my gf and i are not chinese--they watched with concern as my girlfriend and i had our first bites, but then beamed when we indicated our pleasure--the lychee pork was that first visit btw) but thought it was the weakest dish--like scoop mentioned it wasn't overly sweet, and while nice still not as delicious or nuanced as the razor clam omelette and rabbit in fu chow. Those two are big winners though. I'll be curious to try Rong Hang's fish fillet dish sometime.