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When does bad Customer Service supersede good food?

Fairly new here and perhaps this is a topic that has been discussed to death in the past. Brought to mind by some recent posts regarding Zinc Bistro on he Southwest board as well as by somewhat recent posts regarding the Original Pancake House (Pancake Nazis) that is located in Scottsdale.

At what point does it simply become too much for you to take in order to enjoy the food you like? If the service is somewhat surly or indifferent will you tolerate it in order to enjoy a first class dinner? Is the service as important to you as the food you are eating. Where do you draw the line?

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  1. >>When does bad Customer Service supersede good food?

    Hmmm. Bad might mean different things to different people. There are steak and pizza places here in NY where the servers are gruff, grumpy, short and no nonsense. While not my idea of good service, this is a hallmark of the restaurants. That said, the food comes quickly, the patron isn't rushed, and on the two places I have in mind, the food is very, very good.

    Then again, there are the restaurants which rush me. I hate being rushed. Loathe it, in fact. So, since that is my ultimate deal breaker, I won't go back to a place that rushes me, even if they had the best food on the planet.

    >>Is the service as important to you as the food you are eating.

    I'd have to say it is more important.

    1. There really are a lot of variables to this question. I've got a high threshold for things (slow service, being rushed, indifference). Now, if it takes over an hour to receive my food with no apologies or explanations whatsoever, that's a different story (which happened to DH once). But I detest rudeness (and I'm talking more than the typical steakhouse type). Luckily, this hasn't happened very often. But I refuse to eat at a place if the people are rude, no matter how good the food is.

      1. There isn't a specific way to quantify the "point". Often I realize the point has been crossed in retrospect. Usually it manifests as great reluctance to revisit a place. That's when I realize the the service has tainted the food for me. If the food is really good, I won't write it off immediately - it takes several experiences to get me to that stage.

        2 Replies
        1. re: meatn3

          >> it takes several experiences to get me to that stage.

          Do you give several experiences to places that don't give a tinker's damn about the dining patron, meatn3? I give them two visits and that's it.

          1. re: meatn3

            >> it takes several experiences to get me to that stage.

            Do you give several experiences to a place that doesn't give a tinker's damn about dining patrons, meatn3? I give them two visits, and that's it.

          2. I have a little red line. Good experiences at a place make my attitude toward a place move below the red line. Bad experiences at a place make my attitude toward a place move toward the red line. If the red line gets reached, I don't visit the place again.

            The velocity at which the red line gets approached can be very rapid indeed (one visit) or take two or three visits. And, since I'm human, depending on the day/week I've had, the distance to the red line can be a lot shorter and that might make me cross a place off my list unfairly. Or slightly unfairly. But that's life.

            1 Reply
            1. re: Pincus

              Great reply, Pincus. I guess you could call your tolerance level the 'thin red line.'

            2. It depends on the type of food at the restaurant. If it's something I can make a version of at home as well (or better), then bad service pretty much means I'm done with a place. If it's a type of food I can't make well or at all and is really good, I'll put up with more bad service because it's my only access to that particular type of cuisine.

              That being said, there's little I can't live without and the main point of eating out is being served rather than hassling to cook my own food. Overall, the service is just as important (if not moreso) than the food itself.