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Need help with weird pizza recipe

I've been messing around in the kitchen with a pizza that's more like bagels and lox. I made a very thin crust, and in my ideal world I'd then make a smoked salmon, capers, red onions and goat cheese pizza. But the goat cheese doesn't melt (just softens) and so there's not enough coverage. I tried drizzling it with olive oil, but that didn't stop the whole thing from drying out. Then I tried cooking crust first and then adding toppings for less oven time, but they still dried out. Tried a white cream sauce, but mine ended up being more like gravy (as in biscuits and).

So, is there any hard and/or shreddable cheese that would go well with goat cheese and compliment the smoked salmon? Or can anyone think of a better sauce I could use? I've got my heart set on this....

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  1. do you really want to heat up the smoked salmon? the smoked samon pizza recipes i've seen had you add the smoked salmon and cheese/sauce after the dough has been thoroughly cooked w/ the veggies...

    here's an example:

    http://importance.corante.com/archive...

    1 Reply
    1. re: soypower

      that's right. add salmon once pizza cooked.

      to make goat cheese more meltable/spreadable, could you blend it with some cream cheese and cream?

    2. Some goat cheeses don't melt very well, you're right. Most of the chevre I've encountered, for example, does exactly what you describe. I encountered the same difficulty when trying to do a goat cheese based queso fundido. Of course, cheeses made from goat milk run the gamut of flavors, but assuming you're looking for something with some tang like a chevre, there are some out there that melt fairly well. I ended up blending a smoother melting goat cheese with some chevre and was very happy with the results. Unfortunately I don't remember the name of the one I used, but the key is moisture content. I say go to a good cheese shop, taste some dense, high-moisture goat cheeses and pick one out that you can use to cut the chevre and get the melty texture you're looking for.

      1. why not just cut the goat cheese with a mild grated mozzarella? i don't think it will impact the flavor of the goat cheese too dramatically.
        i don't think that sauce would really be appropriate in this case, although, since you say bagels, i do wonder if you could apply a thin layer of cream cheese to the crust to keep it soft?

        3 Replies
        1. re: pigtails

          I'd definitely go with prebaking the crust first. There are very soft and spreadable goat cheeses like Chavrie that could be spread across the pizza while it is hot, much like the cream cheese that pigtails suggests. And I also agree with soypower that the texture of smoked salmon is much nicer if it's not subjected to the oven's heat.

          1. re: btnfood

            I think the signature smoked salmon pizza by Wolfgang Puck uses creme frachie rather than cheese, which to me a lot of sense as you want something with a mildly sweet taste to compliment the salty taste smoke salmon (hence creme frachie with smoke salmon on blini)

            1. re: kobetobiko

              Creme fraiche, thinly-sliced onions, and lardons/bacon are the toppings for tarte flambe, the very popular "pizza" of Alsace.

        2. You don't really need compete coverage. Brush the crust with olive oil and some herbs. Place the goat cheese and other stuff on and just bake. I don't think pizza really needs to have a complete coverage of cheese to be good.

            1. Thanks for all the great suggestions. I think I will refrain from adding the smoked salmon at all during cooking time, and I'll also give the mozarella a try. And I'll try a version with the cream fraiche. Thanks again everyone! I'll let you know if I get any wild successes!

              __
              Save Our Seeds: Eat Them!
              http://beckyandthebeanstock.com/

              2 Replies
              1. re: BeckyAndTheBeanstock

                Might be worth a shot just running your goat cheese through a food mill to give it a very fine crumb - might be able to scatter the result enough to achieve complete coverage

                1. re: malabargold

                  i don't think a mill would work. plus, it would be a real pain to clean -- and you'd lose cheese in the process,