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Lidia Bastianich's updated website

e
emery_jc Mar 26, 2008 08:37 PM

http://www.lidiasitaly.com/

Darn, this was one of my favorite websites because it had so many of her recipes. It looks like they've now significantly scaled them back. The site has a note "unfortunately due to copyright laws, we are not permitted to post all recipes from her latest books, Lidia’s Italy and Lidia’s Family Table."

Sigh, I was looking forward to making the Limoncello Tiramisu.

  1. farmersdaughter Mar 27, 2008 09:32 AM

    Use the public library. I use the library to road test most cookbooks before I buy them, and some I just copy one or two of the recipes and put in my three ring binder.

    1. c
      cook52 May 2, 2008 07:07 PM

      Lidia is more into traveling these days, and slurping her food

      5 Replies
      1. re: cook52
        greygarious Jan 22, 2009 08:53 AM

        Glad someone else has noticed the slurping - although it's no wonder, given how much olive oil she pours over her creations! What IS surprising is that TV chefs' bad eating habits seem to go uncorrected by the people making the programs. Both Lidia and Ming slurp, then slosh the food and wine around together in their mouths before swallowing. Neither's mom seems to have taught them not to speak with food in their mouths, either.
        Hit that mute button NOW!

        1. re: greygarious
          LindaWhit Jan 23, 2009 09:42 AM

          But is it not socially acceptable to slurp soups/noodles in most Asian cultures? An earlier NAF thread re: slurping: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/381512 So I don't fault Ming for that.

          Not sure if Italians slurp their noodles on a regular basis and whether it's considered OK in Italy. ;-)

          1. re: LindaWhit
            greygarious Jan 23, 2009 10:58 AM

            Yes, that's true - but he's American born-and-raised and presenting on an American network so he doesn't get a pass from me any more than the guy at the next table in a restaurant.

            1. re: greygarious
              LindaWhit Jan 23, 2009 11:06 AM

              Fair enough. But were his parents born in China? Perhaps that's where he learned it from. My father was born in Shanghai in the mid 1920s (of American parents) and I learned how to use utensils the European way (fork tines down in left hand and eat that way vs. switching to the right hand) vs. the American way. I know utensil usage and slurping are two different things; just pointing out that if it was learned at an early age, it becomes habit.

              1. re: LindaWhit
                Phaedrus Feb 16, 2009 06:26 AM

                I posted a thread a few months back about this. When I first got to vcollege, it was kind of a nervous experience because I was allowed to eat however I wanted. It wasn't until I got to college that the proper anglo table manner was required. Now, there are very stringent rules on dining in China, but everyday folks did whatever they wanted. I posted about trying to educate a junior colleagues from China who slurps, chews with his mouth open etc. and I was trying to figure out how to tell him that this is verboten.

                But upon thinking about it, I could really care less about what others think if I am truly enjoying myself and loving the food that I was eating. Slurping also allows me to suck in air as I ate, I am sure that is a small component of the whole eating experience that makes it pleasurable, thepsychological effect of happily slurping food in.

      2. ChefJune May 2, 2008 07:40 PM

        did you check the pbs web site for her show? if she made the tiramisù on the show, I'd guess the recipe is there, at least for a few weeks.

        I don't give all my recipes away, either. Otherwise why would you need to buy the book?

        1. Midlife Feb 15, 2009 05:24 PM

          I just had a taste of this when I watched a recently aired recipe for potatoes and artichokes. I had just been given a copy of "Lidia's Italian-American Kitchen", but this recipe is in "Lidia's Italy" I think. Anyway, it isn't on her website and her show (Lidia's Italy) isn't anywhere I can see on the pbs.org site. Darn!!!!!

          I guess one recipe isn't too much to absorb at the local Border's.

          1 Reply
          1. re: Midlife
            j
            jules1026 Feb 16, 2009 07:48 PM

            Agreed. If it's on show, I would like to see it on the website so I can try it at home later. It would probably even lead to a book sale if it goes well.

          2. JoanN Feb 15, 2009 05:36 PM

            "unfortunately due to copyright laws, we are not permitted to post all recipes from her latest books"

            Total BS. She owns the copyright. She can do whatever she damn pleases. Her publisher (or husband, or lawyer) convinced her it was cutting into her book sales. Liar, liar, pants on fire.

            1. LindaWhit Feb 16, 2009 04:08 AM

              To anyone looking for recipes that *were* on Lidia's site, have you thought about trying to find it via the Wayback Machine? Was the site always called lidiasitaly.com? It doesn't seem to be coming up with anything, but if it had a different URL, perhaps recipes could be found that way (although the OP's desire for Limoncello Tiramisu seems to be able to be found on Epicurious and a few other sites).

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