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pasta as pie weights.

Halie Mar 23, 2008 10:07 AM

will this work if I use small pasta, like macaroni? is it heavy enough?

  1. j
    jeanmarieok Mar 23, 2008 10:25 AM

    I don't think it will be heavy enough. I recently heard of someone using clean pennies as pie weights, but I haven't tried it yet.

    1. t
      tastelikechicken Mar 23, 2008 10:33 AM

      I don't think it's heavy enuff and I think the pasta will start to burn quickly and throw off some nasty smoke. How about raw white rice or raw dry beans? I have ceramic pie weights but only enuff for 1 pie so if I'm doing more that's what I use.

      1 Reply
      1. re: tastelikechicken
        Halie Mar 23, 2008 11:22 AM

        thank you! I will see if I have either :)

      2. p
        pengcast Mar 23, 2008 08:30 PM

        I use dry beans like navy beans or chick peas. Also in a pinch I did use pennies wrapped in tin foil.

        1. a
          Amanita Mar 24, 2008 05:29 AM

          French people use dried beans. Being delightfully thrifty, they keep them to use over and over as pie weights.
          I'd be scared to use pennies, unless wrapped. Copper is a toxin!
          My friend Madeleine tells about making a pie during the war, when country people used pebbles as pie weights. Her husband (usually oblivious to the kitchen, of course, such things being women's work) took one look at it before it went into the oven and said, "On mange des tartes aux cailloux maintenant?"

          1. k
            karykat Mar 24, 2008 10:53 AM

            I agree the pasta wouldn't be heavy enough. Some places are selling little chains to use as pie weights. That way when the baking is done, you can pull them out in one fell swoop. Remembering that they are going to be hot! I have found these easier to use than the ceramic weights. Probably beans would have the same problem?

            You could probably buy lengths of small chains at a hardware store?

            4 Replies
            1. re: karykat
              t
              tastelikechicken Mar 24, 2008 11:03 AM

              I think King Arthur carries in their catalog a ball bearing chain made out of surgical stainless steel. The ceramic needs to be either picked up individually or poured out, either way can be a pain. But the do dissapate heat alot quicker than steel does. I don't think I would use chain from a hardware store. Never know what it's been coated with.

              1. re: tastelikechicken
                k
                karykat Mar 24, 2008 12:41 PM

                That is exactly what I have. The ball bearing chain from King Arthur. You may have a good point about the coatings on hardware store chains. You could put foil down and then the chain on top of that. I know a lot of people do use foil with other kinds of weights. Not sure if that traps moisture and affects the crust, though.

                1. re: karykat
                  k
                  kmr Mar 24, 2008 01:13 PM

                  I've always used dried beans, with a piece of parchment under to make them easy to remove without making the crust soggy....and the beans can be reused for years....my mom's pie beans are almost 50 years old, I've been using the same for 20 years.

                  1. re: karykat
                    t
                    tastelikechicken Mar 24, 2008 01:13 PM

                    I tend to use a piece of parchment paper under the weights just out of habit. Doesn't affect the crust.

              2. b
                Billow Fair Mar 24, 2008 01:44 PM

                I use clean pennies frequently for pie weights. Everyone has a handful in a jar somewhere and they conduct heat beautifully and have plenty of weight. 100 is just about right for a lie crust. Perhaps if they stop making them I can sell them for $3.99 per hundred as Presidential Copper Pie Weights!

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