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Whats the difference between Bombay and Sapphire

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  • ac106 Mar 20, 2008 01:33 PM
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The bottles give a similar discription. They difference seems to be the color of the bottle.

Anyone have more helpfull info?

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  1. I presume you don't mean "What is the difference between Bombay and Sapphire," as Sapphire IS Bombay. Don't you mean, "What is the difference between Bombay's 'regular' Gin and Bombay Sapphire Gin?"

    Bombay makes two gins -- their "regular" London Dry Gin -- clear glass, 80 proof -- and their "Sapphire" London Dry Gin -- blue glass, 94 (?) proof. The most obvious difference is the level of alcohol in the two gins, but also there is the distinct difference in the botanicals used -- I believe the original recipe uses only eight, while Sapphire uses ten. Even if both use the same number, they are employed in difference ratios to one another.

    The best way to tell the difference is to taste them for yourself -- go to a bar and have two cocktails made, one with each gin . . . or better yet, try them both straight.

    1. I was going to say about the same thing as zin1953

      Go taste them, they are a completely different beast. I can't find my tasting notes on the two or else i would post them.

      The Bombay Original Dry Gin is a classic EDG, light, crisp, clean and I think it is 86 proof and has eight botanicals.

      The Bombay Sapphire English Dry Gin is more like some of the new, bigger gins. It is 94 proof and has ten botanicals: Juniper, almonds, lemon, licorice, orris root, angelica, coriander, cassia, cubeb berries, and grains of paradise. I personally don't like it and I like most gins. Probably because of the orris root which brings in a flavor I personally call the French style since many French gins use this botanical. I think it tastes like burning plastic. Sapphire is one of those wonders of marketing. A gin for those who don't necessarily like gin, made famous.