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Julia Child Grilled Leg of Lamb Recipe

s
salmon Mar 19, 2008 11:20 AM

I have been doing some research on leg of lamb recipes (plan to cook my first this weekend) and kept coming across references to a butterflied grilled recipe from Julia Child. I can't seem to find the recipe online so I would like to purchase the book. Can anyone tell me which book this recipe is in? I have none of her books yet (yes, I know that is a crime!! My only ~ poor ~excuse is that I am young ;).

Any tips from others who have mastered this recipe? Or some other recipe that is a must for leg of lamb?

Thanks in advance and can't wait to savor my lamb!

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  1. oakjoan RE: salmon Mar 19, 2008 12:10 PM

    I only have Mastering The Art, Vols. 1 and 2, so I don't have any recipes for butterflied lamb. I can highly recommend the Gigot a la Moutarde on p. 335 of the first volume. The simple marinade of Dijon mustard, soy sauce, garlic, rosemary and ginger makes a spectacularly good roast. I think this marinade would be great on a butterflied, grilled leg of lamb as well.

    Sorry I don't have an answer to your question.

    1. b
      barbh RE: salmon Mar 19, 2008 12:19 PM

      It's from "Julia Child & Company". My favorite way to do lamb. It can be grilled or roasted in the oven. I think the book is out of print, but I saw it on ebay recently.

      1 Reply
      1. re: barbh
        BobB RE: barbh May 28, 2009 02:06 PM

        Yes, it's in Julia Child & Company, which I have. Basically (paraphrasing here to suit the rules of Chowhound), rub the outside of the butterflied meat (that is, the side from which you have removed the fell, not the inside from which you have removed the bones) with a tbsp of olive oil and lay it oiled side down. Then rub the inside with a mix of about 3 tbsps of olive oil, 2 tbps soy sauce, the juice of 1/2 lemon (plus the zest of the lemon if you like), 1/2 tsp or so of rosemary leaves, and 1 or 2 pureed cloves of garlic. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit an hour or more.

        Grill, turning every 5 minutes, until it reaches an internal temperature of 125°. This may take 45 minutes to an hour (or less, depending on the heat and configuration of your grill.) Let it sit 10 minutes, then carve.

      2. j
        JNUNZMAN RE: salmon Mar 19, 2008 01:11 PM

        This recipe is killer!!! Always get raves when I serve it and it's so easy!! I never measure anything in this recipe.
        Get as much of the silver skin off of the butterflied leg of lamb as possible.
        In a bowl, mix 1 medium jar of dijon mustard (1-1.5 cups), 4 or 5 cloves of minced garlic,
        juice of 1 lemon, a couple of tablespoons of chopped fresh rosemary, and about a half cup of olive oil. You could even add a bit of red wine vinegar. Throw in about a teaspoon or so of salt and black pepper to your taste.Whisk it until it emulsifies.
        With your hands, it all over the meat on both sides, cover in a container, and let sit overnight (preferable). I've also only let it marinate for a few hours and it was still good.
        Throw it on a hot grill and cook until desired doneness. Be careful, due to the uneveness of the meat thickness you'll get varying degrees of doneness. It will cook quicker than you think. Take off of the grill and let sit covered for 10 minutes or so and slice against the grain.
        I'm drooling right now!!! I usually serve this with coucous topped with assorted grilled or roasted veggies topped with fine feta cheese.

        1. c
          cucina RE: salmon Mar 19, 2008 01:52 PM

          The recipe that jnunzman posted from Julia Child sounds great - I might have to try it myself.
          I've made the following recipe from epicurious for the last couple of Easters and it's delicious, in case you're interested.
          http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo... (Grilled butterflied leg of lamb with lemons, herbs and garlic). Note that there is a misprint in the ingredient list - it says "3 Tbsp of olive oil Paste" - it is supposed to say just olive oil; the word Paste is an error (I have the original recipe).

          2 Replies
          1. re: cucina
            oakjoan RE: cucina Mar 19, 2008 10:01 PM

            Jnunz' recipe is very similar to the one I posted above from MTAOFC, Vol. 1. Change the red wine vinegar to soy sauce and you've about got it.

            1. re: cucina
              j
              JNUNZMAN RE: cucina Mar 20, 2008 03:42 PM

              My recipe didn't come from Julia Child, but I saw a chef on Food Network do something similar years ago and I just adapted to my own taste. I'd be curious to see what Julia does to a piece of lamb.

            2. purple goddess RE: salmon Mar 19, 2008 10:10 PM

              Salmon,

              Lamb is pretty much the national dish here in Australia. Everyone has their own "killer" recipe, here's mine.

              Poke lots of hole in the leg, into random holes poke either a) a sliver of garlic, b) a sprig of rosemary or c) a small bit of fillet of anchovy. Let the leg sit for an hour or so.

              In the bottom of your roasting pan, lay as many aromatics as you can get your hands on.. rosemary, garlic, fennel, pomegranate, fresh mint, lemons and oranges are a few I typically use.

              Whack the leg on top of the bed of aromatic and pour a mix of lemon (or orange) juice and olive oil over the top. Surround the leg with some vegies (potatoes and vine ripened tomatoes, some kumara or capsicums).

              Pour a bit of verjuice or white wine into the pan, cover with foil and bake at 180C for about 1.5 hours. Uncover and cook a further 1/2hr uncovered.

              completely awesome!

              1. r
                rogerkaplan RE: salmon Apr 4, 2009 05:47 AM

                This article is also in "The Way to Cook" and is really fantastic. I have been making it for years to rave reviews. The mustard-soy-lemon marinade is mandatory.
                Some tips:
                1. Don't worry too much about the proportions in the marinade. And make a lot more than she recommends.
                2. Marinate at least overnight, making sure the marinade covers the whole leg and gets in all the crevices.
                3. I've found the final "painting" of the leg with reserved marinade is unnecessary
                4. Use a meat thermometer.

                1. o
                  operadoc RE: salmon May 28, 2009 01:37 PM

                  I have cooked thisw recipe for over 20 years - it first appeared in her TV series as "An indoor/outdoor Barbeque" The one addition I make is to crush juniper berries on top of the lamb and baste it with rosemary sprigs dipped in olive oil. It is a crowd pleaser and because it ends up with different sized pieces, there is rare and medium meat with plenty of delicious "end" pieces.

                  1. ChefJune RE: salmon May 28, 2009 01:42 PM

                    This grilled, butterflied leg of lamb will wow your guests, and it will also wow you by how easy it is, and how quickly it cooks.

                    Butterflied Leg of Lamb à la Provençale

                    makes 8 servings
                    1 Leg of Lamb, trimmed and boned (approximately 5 pounds trimmed weight)
                    (Be sure to ask your butcher to remove the fell.)
                    Marinade:
                    1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
                    1 tablespoon fresh rosemary leaves
                    1 tablespoon fresh marjoram leaves
                    3 cloves garlic
                    4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
                    1 lemon, juice and zest

                    1. Coarsely chop leaves and garlic. Add lemon zest and mix with oil and juice of the lemon. Rub lamb well, all over. Wrap in plastic, and marinate at least 1 hour. (You can let it sit up to three hours in the refrigerator.)
                    2. Grill over rosy red coals, or an electric range top grill, for 45 minutes (to 130 degrees F. internal). Or, you may roast it in the oven--375 degrees F. for 20 to 25 minutes, then slide under the broiler 2 minutes (to 125 degrees F. internal) to achieve that crusty grilled look.
                    3. Let sit at least 10 minutes before carving.

                    Wine Tip: Although Bordeaux-style wines traditionally pair with lamb, and will go nicely with this leg, I think the garlic and the grilling indicate a more robust wine. I¹d suggest any Provençal red, or a chewy Zinfandel from California.

                    1. Phurstluv RE: salmon May 30, 2009 02:13 PM

                      I love Julia's recipe, but more recently I have used Martha Stewart's for grilled leg of lamb, and it is just as delicious and a lot less time consuming - no marination overnight.

                      6 cloves of garlic, minced
                      1/3 cup herbes de provence or mixture of thyme, oregano, marjoram, rosemary, & savory
                      1/4 cup of olive oil
                      salt & f.g .pepper

                      Mix ingredients into a paste. Rub meat liberally until it's evenly coated, then wrap in plastic and marinate in fridge up to 6 hours. Let sit for 30 minutes at room temp before grilling to your preference.

                      I love using the whole menu of hers which includes an haricot vert & goat cheese salad, black olive relish, provencal roasted tomatoes & whole grilled garlic. Serve the whole thing with good bread and it's a great meal. comes from her 2001 book, MS Living Annual Recipes, from Oxmoor House.

                      1 Reply
                      1. re: Phurstluv
                        BobB RE: Phurstluv Jun 1, 2009 08:06 AM

                        Martha's is pretty much the same as Julia's, minus the lemon juice. And Julia's recipe does not call for marinating overnight - the copy I have just says to marinate for "an hour or more, if possible."

                      2. h
                        Harters RE: salmon May 30, 2009 02:55 PM

                        Butterflied leg can be good. I tend to think of it as eastern mediterranean, so having spent an age carefully getting the bone out, I slash the meat a bit to even out the thickness - and then just give it a herby oily rub. Olive oil - you don't need extra virgin for this job - and whatever herbs I have growing outside that seem good - usually rosemary, mint, marjoram. Dried tyme and oregano will also work - and are, IMO, better than the fesh versions. It's goign to take next to no time in the oven or on the BBQ.

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