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I need advice - How can I cook this beef tenderloin roast ahead of time without it getting overdone? How do restaurants do it?

cheereeo Mar 18, 2008 01:19 PM

I have made this incredible recipe before, and it always goes over magnificently.
http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Beef-Ten...
I'm not worried about the sauce which is a bit time-consuming with reduction times because I can do it ahead of time, but I am more worried about the roast itself. I made it a couple of Easter's ago, and I remember it took longer than I anticipated to get to 125 degrees, and I'll never forget hovering in the kitchen while everything else was done waiting for the temp to rise, and then still needing to allow the 20- to 30-minute resting time. I always allow the roast to come to room temperature before I start cooking it and my oven was regulated. I am going to double the sauce which will be served hot. And I plan on using my meat slicer to cut the roast paper thin. Any advice, or do you think I could cook this meat earlier in the day (say so it is done about an hour earlier than I anticipate) and let it rest at room temperature until ready to slice and serve with the hot sauce. Don't want ice cold beef and hot sauce. I definitely do NOT want it to lose its rareness.

Its the typical, I'd like to be with my guests, not stressing in the kitchen worrying about a lazy cooking roast.

Thanks

  1. Siobhan Mar 18, 2008 05:19 PM

    You can hold it in an oven set at about 120 degrees, if your oven has this low of a setting. In restaurants, this is how they hold stuff, though they have pro equipment like an Alto Shaam.

    2 Replies
    1. re: Siobhan
      cheereeo Mar 20, 2008 12:44 PM

      Would I hold it in the oven whole or slice it and hold the slices in the oven--fearing the losing of the "pink."

      1. re: cheereeo
        rabaja Mar 20, 2008 12:54 PM

        Hold or tent it whole, DO NOT CUT! You will lose your color quickly.
        If you are talking about a whole beef tenderloin, once seared and roasted to desired rareness, it should stay reasonably warm with a foil tent It's a big piece of meat.
        Warm you platter, warm you sauce.

    2. GretchenS Mar 18, 2008 01:35 PM

      I definitely think you can do it earlier and let it sit for an hour or so. Sounds delicious. Have you sliced warm beef with your meat slicer before? Maybe it's just the one I have used but it doesn't do well on warm meat, only cold meat.

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