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what is the best way to cook a shoulder cut steak?

fayehess Mar 4, 2008 07:39 AM

thanks.

  1. Uncle Bob Mar 4, 2008 09:03 AM

    Ah.,..would that be, beef, pork, venison, lamb, goat, or other shoulder??

    6 Replies
    1. re: Uncle Bob
      fayehess Mar 4, 2008 09:26 AM

      oops--beef.

      1. re: fayehess
        Uncle Bob Mar 4, 2008 10:59 AM

        Miss Faye...Ya did say "steak" not "roast" right?? If you have the package are there any other "clues" as to the cut? Painting with a broad brush..braising is the go to 'method' most times on this end of the cow. However there are some cuts out of the shoulder/chuck that can be excellent grilled HOT and FAST!!

        1. re: Uncle Bob
          fayehess Mar 5, 2008 04:16 AM

          It just says "shoulder steak". It's about 6 inches long and 4 inches wide, and it has 3 lines of connective tissue running across it. I asked the butcher if I should slow cook it or cook it quickly, and he answered me without wanting to commit to either camp--he said "Sure".
          fayefood.com

          1. re: fayehess
            Uncle Bob Mar 5, 2008 05:31 AM

            "Sure" Hahahaha. Sounds like he didn't know! Well I was thinking it may be a "Flat Iron" (Shoulder top blade), but 3 lines of connective tissue rule that out. So I suppose to your original ?
            Braising seems to be the answer. You should have several excellent recipes in your repertoire...A simple pot roast (comfort food) or Hey!!..Kick it up with a 40 cloves of Garlic party!!!

            Enjoy!!!

            1. re: Uncle Bob
              m
              magicchef Dec 31, 2008 05:38 AM

              What part of the cow is shoulder steak and what should I look for if I am not in, let's say; a kosher butcher shop?

              1. re: magicchef
                d
                Diane in Bexley Dec 31, 2008 07:57 AM

                Magic, shoulder is from the chuck (front end) of the cow. I would definitely braise this, so I would look for a piece of meat that has some marbling as fat = flavor and if you are cooking for long time, you want something that isn't going to dry out.

    2. speyerer Mar 4, 2008 10:06 AM

      Beef Daube (Pot Roast)
      Serves: 6

      When a Creole cooks a shoulder roast, he calls it daube. To a Frenchman it's pot-au-feu. If an Italian prepares it, it becomes stracotto. Whereas in Cuba, pot roast is referred to as ropa vieja. No matter how you say it, this is good eating.


      Ingredients:

      • 3 Tablespoons vegetable oil
      • 1 (3 pound) beef shoulder roast
      • 4 cloves garlic, cut in half lengthwise
      • 2 Tablespoons Creole Seasoning
      • 2 cup onions, chopped
      • 2 cup celery, chopped
      • 1 cup bell pepper, chopped
      • 1 (14 ounce) can crushed Italian tomatoes
      • 1 cup dry red wine
      • 4 cups beef stock/broth
      • 1 sprig rosemary
      • 2 onions, quartered
      • 3 carrots, halved
      • 4 new potatoes

      Method:

      1. Using a sharp paring knife, poke six to eight one-inch deep slits into the roast.

      Note: The beef roast can be shoulder, chuck, rump or bottom round.

      2. Stuff these slits with the garlic slices.
      3. Season roast well on all sides with Creole Seasoning.
      4. In a black cast iron pot heat vegetable oil over medium-high heat.
      5. Brown roast well on all sides. When golden brown, add onions, celery, bell pepper and garlic.
      6. Sauté the onions, celery, carrots, bell pepper and garlic 3-5 minutes or until vegetables are wilted.
      7. Add the tomatoes and their liquid and cook for 3 minutes longer.
      8. Add the wine and bring to a boil over high heat; boil for 3 minutes.
      9. Add beef stock and rosemary, bring to a rolling boil and reduce heat to simmer.
      10. Cover Dutch oven and allow roast to simmer 3½ hours.
      11. When the roast is tender remove from stock and strain.
      12. Discard vegetables and return stock to the pot.
      13. Return roast to pot with onions, carrots and potatoes.
      14. Bring to a boil and cook until vegetables are tender.

      4 Replies
      1. re: speyerer
        Paul Weller Mar 4, 2008 06:16 PM

        A good pot-au-feu will also have some beef short ribs, a pigs trotter, lamb shanks, and beef shanks.

        1. re: Paul Weller
          speyerer Mar 4, 2008 07:11 PM

          Thanks Paul for the constructive input , the next time I'm in my North Texas Tom Thumb grocery I'll ask the cowboy at the meat counter for a pound or so of nice pigs trotter.
          By the way in response to fayehess, I posted my recipe for the inexpensive cut of beef shoulder. What do you have to offer to help answer this poster's question: "what is the best way to cook a shoulder cut steak?"

          1. re: speyerer
            Paul Weller Mar 5, 2008 06:40 AM

            If you are in North Texas pigs feet should be easy to come by and cheap as well.

        2. re: speyerer
          fayehess Mar 5, 2008 04:17 AM

          this sounds absolutely delicious and I am going to make it pronto (with a roast).

        3. Ora Mar 4, 2008 10:42 AM

          I make this inexpensive cut ALL the time. I don't use a recipe per se. I season the meat with my favorite dry seasoning blends. Then I mix my own braising sauce. Usually this consists of wine and tomato paste, honey. Sometimes for asian flare, hoisan and/or oyster sauce and a touch of seasme oil. You can even use BBQ sauce, whatever mood you are in. I use a glass pyrex dish, smother the meat with sliced onions, peppers (any type) and carrots. Cover w/foil and bake for 2-3 hrs at 350. In last 30 minutes remove foil to reduce liquid/brown if needed. Simple.

          1. jayt90 Mar 4, 2008 11:40 AM

            I get a really good 2" shoulder steak from my best butcher, and grill it over charcoal, no more than 8 minutes. It has tremendous flavor, as good as a rib eye, but more separations. It is tender as well. The butcher says it is cut from the area next to the rib.

            1 Reply
            1. re: jayt90
              fayehess Mar 5, 2008 04:19 AM

              This sounds exactly like what I have. I have no grill, but I'll try pan searing it.

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