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Help with my menu for the shixas

I currently live in Northern CA (grew up in NY) where Jewish and Deli food is considered "ethnic."

My women's group (mainly non-Jews) does a quarterly ethnic cooking "get together" (the guys arrive in time for the food to be served) and this time it's the foods that were a constant at my Grandmother's house. Most of the items they have never made or even had before.

I know it's a ton of food (especially carbs) but I wanted to cover all my bases....besides, what's a Jewish meal without leftovers?

Can you take a look at the menu and tell me if there is anything missing that I should add (to late to subtract anything)?

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Middle Eastern App. plate with Hummus, Baba Ganoush, Smoked Salmon, etc.
Mini Potato Knishes w/mustard sauce

Challah

Matzah Ball Soup

Beef Brisket

Tsimmes
Latkes with apple sauce
Stuffed Cabbage (Vegetarian style)
Matzoh Farfel
Noodle Kugel

Dessert (rugeluch, mandelbrot, Hamentashen, babkah, etc.)
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Remember, these are common items in the East but out here...it's exotic!

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  1. If you are truly looking for something ethnic and somewhat exotic, I'd go for tongue rather than brisket. And serve it all with Dr. Browns Celray soda.

    4 Replies
    1. re: aivri

      Great idea on the DB's. I think I would have to fly back to NY to find it however. Maybe in LA but not here.

      1. re: MSK

        You can find raw tongue at many butchers, especially if there's a Hisapanic market in your area. It's not hard to make at all.

        1. re: Jennalynn

          Excuse me, isn't this the Kosher Board?

          1. re: skipper

            I guess there aren't many Kosher Hispanic butchers in northern CA. Unless they are from Argentina.

    2. Kasha Varnishkas are my favorite "ethnic" food. Not sure if you want to add another starch though.

      1 Reply
      1. re: jes

        Love Kasha! But my thoughts exactly!

        We'll all look like Bubbes by the time we're finished.

        1. re: FeelingALittleBreadish

          I offered CL as a choice for anyone to make but they all said they would rather gag. I tend to agree.

          1. re: berel

            Kishke is a must...I like seeing Smoked Salmon considered Middle Eastern...LOL!

          2. MSK

            This looks wonderful as jfood types and salivates at the same time. But it looks too healthy to be traditional Jewish (guess it's the NoCal influence). You gotta have some shmaltz somewhere.

            Since they already rejected the CL (off with their heads) jfood would recommend a good roasted chicken but leave all the fat on the bird. Then place on a rack with some sliced potatoes underneath to soak up the good juices that the bird release duringthe roasting. Just do not tell them why you made the absolutely best tasting potatoes (jfood is partial to sweet potatoes these days) they ever tasted.

            If you really want to scare them, make a jello mold.

            Mazel Tov on bringing your friends into the 19th century.

            5 Replies
            1. re: jfood

              I've been eating, and cooking, 'Jewish food' all my life, and have never actually eaten anything containing schmaltz.

              And I think of jello molds as fifties white-bread American - if you want something gelatinized and Jewish, make them p'tcha/galeh ;)

              1. re: GilaB

                Then you must get to Sammy's Roumanian in NYC, order the chopped liver appetizer, and they will bring a container of schmaltz, pour some in mix it up and serve. Yum yum

                Mayber jfood should have said red jello mold. Red was for jewish and green was for non-jewish households in jfood's neighborhood growing up.

                1. re: jfood

                  My mom would ruin perfectly good jello by mixing in canned fruit cocktail.

                2. re: GilaB

                  If you've eaten kasha varnishkas or chopped live, you've probably had schmaltz.

                  1. re: GilaB

                    I do know that my grandmother's recipe for matzah balls included shmaltz- that's fairly common, so you might have without knowing it.