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kitchen faucets

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I am redoing my kitchen and wanted recommendations for sink faucets- for a d shaped franke sink in large and a smaller sink in my island- Do people like the pull down faucet head and goosenecks and what type of lever is best- side vs. front or back etc.
thanks

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  1. I strongly prefer the single hole mount faucets with one "mixer" handle. They're easy to adjust with just one hand, and they provide a clutter-free look. Not to mention they're easier to clean! The ONLY problem with a pull-out faucet is that you cannot use those Pur water filters with them. But I consider the trade off a good one. My pull out provides both spray and aerated stream with the push of a button. And it's in stainless to match the sink. A nice coordinated look.

    1 Reply
    1. re: Caroline1

      I agree with Caroline1's rec. If a filter is an issue there are some great under-sink filters available but I changed to that type of filter before I changed my faucet-I hated how the filter looked on my faucet.

    2. I remodeled my kitchen four years ago and am thrilled with this choice (mine is white):

      http://www.groheamerica.com/t/25_3975...

      The single handle makes things simple and the height of the faucet enables big pots to get under it simply. I love the choice of water flow too. One hole mount keeps the kitchen looking neat and is much easier to clean. The pull-out faucet is great for cleaning the sink.

      1 Reply
      1. re: fershore

        one word on grohe, jfood thinks there are two companies, grohe and the other is grohe america. he thinks there is a difference in price point and quality.

      2. I'm in the minority here. My tap water is very hard and clogs single handle faucet valves to the unfixable point. Therefore I'm sold on separate quarter turn, ceramic valve faucets. Go with a quality name brand. YMMV!

        2 Replies
        1. re: DiveFan

          Not to imply there is anything wrong with ceramic valves (and btw, ceramic valves are available as single handle faucets), but if your water is that hard and if you draw water for cooking and drinking from your kitchen sink, why wouldn't you go with an undercounter (or even whole-house) water filter? Just curious.

          1. re: DiveFan

            - The cartridges for the undersink filters make them an overly pricey option.

            - I love the idea of a whole house filter (say, reverse osmosis) but it has to wait for a major remodel and copper repipe in order to fit one in. Due to downstream water purification issues, salt based softeners are outlawed in many communities around here.

            In the meantime, I'll drink and cook with cheap bottled water from the neighborhood water store and presoak my clothes in TSP or Biz before washing.

          2. Lever- my requirement is that I have to be able to manipulate it with my forearm so I don't have to touch it with raw chicken gore-covered hands before I wash them. I don't get the faucets that require you to grab them with your hands in order to turn them on. It seems unsanitary for a kitchen.

            1. W've got the Kohler Avatar, comes in a few colors, no hands neccesary, lifetime guarantee (they just sent me a new hose). Now, there's something to be said by having pedal controls. Friends have them and there's no handle to deal with.

              http://www.homecenter.com/ProductDeta...

              2 Replies
              1. re: jnk

                I seriously thought about a pedal operated faucet for my kitchen sink, but they work best with new construction and I didn't want to give up any under-sink space.

                There are also faucets that have an electronic sensor device similar to automatic door openers that turn on the water when you put your hands under the spout. Unfortunately, I wasn't able to find one designed for kitchen sinks. Maybe they're among the "Coming Attractions". I suspect they have a few bugs to work out, such as temperature control. They are currently available for home bathrooms.

                1. re: Caroline1

                  Eeeh. We've got sensor-activated sinks in the restrooms at work and I hate them with the seething hate of a white hot sun because the sensors never ever ever work properly. I have to hit them on the faucet in order to get the water to come out half the time.

              2. jfood is not a big fan of combos. if you can, think of a separate sprayer. if there is a problem with the sprayer (and it has in casa jfood) then it is an inexpensive trip to the kitchen store for a replacement. If it is a combo, you might have to replace the whole faucet, much more expensive.

                on the single versus double handle, jfood opted for the single for the following reason - raw chicken on your hands. When jfood is working with raw chicken and other meats and suddenly wants the water turned on, a single handle is the way to go. It is almost impossible to do the double handle at that point.

                2 Replies
                1. re: jfood

                  I had the same concerns about the long-term wear of pull-out faucets when I was trying to decide what to buy. I consulted three professional plumbers, including one from my home owners warantee service, another a plumber my electrical contractor/general contractor son considers the top in his field in their area, and the third was a plumber I randomly selected from the Yellow Pages.

                  All three of them assured me that there are no more problems with pull outs than there are with solitary hoses, and said the hose of a pull out faucet can be replaced without replacing the entire faucet. But... I failed to ask whether I could do it myself or if I would have to call them! (Caroline, you goofed!) But if that's the way it works out, it will cost me $55.00 through my home owners warrantee. Great program!

                  But one thing I have noticed with all of the pull out I've used in the last decade or so, whether seperate or part of the faucet, is that the hoses no longer seem to be fitted with a weight under the sink to help them retract when you're through using them. So I do have a weight of some sort on my mental shopping lis, but I think I need to actually write it down because I keep forgetting it!

                  1. re: jfood

                    I completely agree. I just went "back" to a lever after we moved and it was a relief to know I could wedge the faucet on with my forearm when working with raw chicken, etc. And since we're now undergoing a midlevel kitchen remodel I asked a couple of plumbers about the pulldown/combo idea -- they recommended against it for exactly the reasons you describe. I'd much rather replace one piece or the other vs. an expensive combo.