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Clotted Cream

It seems like I've noticed clotted cream come up on the boards lately. I'm not ready to whip some up from scratch just yet but I did pick some up at the market today to give it a try. While the boards seem to suggest that traditionally one eats it with british scones, I was wondering how I might best enjoy some store-bought clotted cream. I realize that just as movies never do books justice, most store-bought items don't even compare to homemade. I just thought this would be an easy way to try something new. Any ideas? Thank you.

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  1. I don't think I've ever bought clotted cream in the U.S. However, depending on where you live, you might find a place that does afternoon tea. In NYC there are a few places including tea and sympathy.

    1. My favorite recipe for scones is from epicurious:

      http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

      Shockingly quick and easy to make. Try those with some strawberry jam and a bit of the clotted cream and a cup of tea to chase the winter doldrums..

      2 Replies
      1. re: janeh

        Oh my goodness that looks so simple, I will definitely try that and report back! Thank you :)

        1. re: janeh

          Made 'em today!! They really were sooo easy. I didn't went for currants though instead of apricots, and I wasn't sure about the lemon/currant combo so I didn't add lemon zest. Should I have? But back to the main pint of the post...store-bought clotted cream: NOT SO MUCH. I'd rather do the work and enjoy the results. What I bought was a geletanous substance that didn't taste much like anything. Thanks to all for the advice :)

        2. I am pretty sure it can be mailed from Cornwall or Devon - I bet if you googled clotted cream you would find some mail order place.

          we normally have it with scones. Very easy to make, delicious warm, and not great the next day so eat em all. I like a few raisins in mine. Just half a scone, strawberry jam and a blob of cream. However clotted cream is also yummy on porridge with brown sugar, or apple crumble/crisp. Anywhere in place of cream on a dessert - mousses, fools, pies.

          1. I've only ever had store-bought/jarred clotted cream (I'm so jealous of those that have had the real thing!). But I thought it was wonderful on scones w/ lemon curd or jam.

            If there are places that do afternoon tea nearby, you may be able to order frozen scones from them. I ordered a bunch for a baby shower that I hosted, and it was so lovely to have warm-from-the-oven "fresh" scones w/ clotted cream & lemon curd. (Note: I've never made scones before, so I went w/ the frozen ones.) Whole Foods & Trader Joe's also sells scones, that I would pop in the toaster oven & eat w/ the cream/curd, but I thought the frozen ones that were baked fresh tasted better.

            1. I've replied to this on another post....but i'm wondering ...is Fussels cream in a can the same as clotted cream? I grew up on Fussels...and see that Carnation cream in the can looks much the same.....and that the clotted cream i see on Wiki..looks like what we had in the cans......

              we always had it over canned peaches or fruit cocktail when i was growing up....or on slabs of home-made bread and jam.

              1. Is clotted cream the same thing as this:

                http://www.wolfermans.com/store/SHOP_...

                It's called Double Devon Cream, and in the picture it looks quite thick on the scone. If it's an English import, and the same as clotted cream, it might be easier and faster to order from Wolferman's.

                Never had it, that I know of. What does it taste like? Tangy, buttery, cream cheese, mascarpone, ricotta? Or none of the above?

                2 Replies
                1. re: nemo

                  I buy the Wolfeman's Devon Cream from Cost Plus.. Thickness wise, it's like butter -- dense but spreadable as long as you let it sit at room temp for 15-20 minutes (we like it cold but not straight from the fridge). Taste wise, it goes well on scones -- it tastes like cream so it's got a nice richness to it. Goes well with a sweet fruit scone like blueberry or cranberry.

                  1. re: nemo

                    double cream is not the same as clotted cream. Double cream is thick and usually can be poured although it can thicken up and need scraping out of the pot.

                    Clotted cream is usually thick though can be a little runny. The difference is that it is way richer and has a sort of crust on the top.

                  2. By reading all the posts on clotted cream (whew!), I decided to try making clotted cream. It came out GREAT, just like what I've had in Britain. I used one pint od Gold Meadows "Old Style" very heavy cream from the grocer's. The idea is to reduce it to less than half original volume. I began by putting it in my double boiler for two hours, stirring occasionally. The reduction process was excessively slow and I ran out of time, so I put it in the frige overnight. The next morning I decided to put it in my immaculately clean cast iron skillet (12 inch), over low heat, electric stove. I neglected it a bit. When I returned to it about 20 minutes later, it was definitely beginning to thicken and yellow! Joy! So I tended it closely for another 90 minutes and voila! Clotted cream. It was just perfect and tasted wonderful. NOT HARD TO MAKE, JUST TAKES TIME. Go for it.

                    1. By reading all the posts on clotted cream (whew!), I decided to try making it, the real stuff, not the whizzed cream cheese or whipped cream fakes. It came out GREAT, just like what I've had in Britain. I used one pint of Gold Meadows "Old Style" very heavy fresh cream from the grocer's. The idea is simple: reduce the cream to less than half its original volume, heating it very slowly over a long period. I began by putting it in my double boiler for two hours, stirring occasionally. The reduction process was excessively slow because of the depth and narrowness of my bowl, and I ran out of time. I put it in the frige overnight, feeling a failure. The next morning I decided to put it in my immaculately clean cast iron skillet (12 inch), over low heat, electric stove. I neglected it a bit. When I returned to it about 20 minutes later, it was definitely beginning to thicken and yellow! So I tended it closely for another, mmmm, maybe two hours, and voila! CLOTTED CREAM. It was just perfect and tasted wonderful. NOT HARD TO MAKE, JUST TAKES TIME. Go for it.

                       
                      1. Well, Hello Ladies!
                        I just tuned in after noticing that a slightly used pint container of organic heavy whipping cream ( 9% fat ) had become very thickened and clotted in appearance. It smelled fine so I dipped a fork in to taste a little and it was pretty fabulous. I dipped in a fresh fork and tried it again just to be sure and it was indeed fabulous. I figured I better see if this kind of thickening of heavy whipping cream ( 3 months old) was a natural occurrence and safe to eat.
                        I am so glad my intuition was accurate and tomorrow I will scoop some out, add a little sugar and serve it .. on muffins or something. I also noticed it had a slight stretchy quality, almost, "thixotropic " ( I'll let you look that one up ! ), which accounts for why shaking it, might re- liquify it.
                        I am so delighted with this accidental delicacy, I will buy another pint of the organic heavy whipping cream and store it the frig for a couple of months to allow it to do its "thickening " thing.......

                        1 Reply
                        1. re: BigAppleGal

                          ? 9% fat? That's not cream at all - more like a very rich milk. Are you sure that was the percentage to start with?

                          Un-homogenised milk and cream will settle and the cream floats to the top, the topmost layer being the thickest. However that takes a great deal less than 3 months. If your cream survived that long it was almost certainly UHT-pasteurised, which affects the flavour for the worse.

                          However what you got was certainly not clotted cream in the traditional sense, which is done by slow evaporation over low heat in shallow pans. You can't really get the density of true clotted cream simply by the ordinary settling process. Clotted cream has the consistency of a stiff American cream cheese. It's spreadable, but quite firm.

                          If what you got had a stretchy quality, that sounds as though what you had was actually separating into curds and whey, and the stretchiness was from proteins bound into the curds. Or it could be additives.

                          One problem with a lot of US cream, that can make it difficult to create clotted cream, is that very little of it seems to be pure cream - without thickeners, stabilisers, and other additives. You have to get one that is absolutely pure to get a good result. The most widely distributed one is the *pasteurised* Organic Valley "Heavy Whipping Cream". It's important to get the one saying pasteurised, *NOT* ultra-pasteurised (and you can identify one from the other because the ultra-pasteurised one has a plastic spout on the carton while the pasteurised one doesn't). It will have an expiration date measured in days into the future rather than weeks or months.