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$25K Chili Recipe [Moved from Texas board]

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On a recent recipe post, a recipe was left by Speyerer for a chili that had won a chili contest in California where 1st prize was $25k. (link is below) I said to myself: I gotta try that chili! This Sunday, I'm having some folks over to watch the Super Bowl and thought I'd make a big batch of this chili. My problem is this: the recipe ingredient list contains Gebhardt's chili powder and "regular dark" cp. In step 8 of the prep. directions, a 3rd cp is mentioned: New Mexico cp, that is not listed in the ingredient list. Any idea how much of that powder was used in the winning recipe? Thanks in advance!

BTW, I have a hard time following directions to the absolute, so I plan to modify the recipe by grinding my own meat (except I don't have any home-ground pork sausage on-hand and I'm not going to make any just so I can have 3 oz of it,) and I think I'll add a chipotle pepper or 2, since I like a nice smoky flavor with my chili. Pintos and masa will be last-minute additions also.

http://www.chow.com/recipes/11372

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  1. Did you check the International Chili Society website for the recipe?

    Also, I know he's posted the recipe on another thread here - try the search feature.

    1. $ 25,000 Chili recipe posted by speyerer
      http://www.chowhound.com/topics/468102

      Link to original $ 25,000 Chili recipe by Margot Knudson
      http://www.chilicookoff.com/Recipe/Re...

      1. You've hit upon my major annoyance with chili cookoff recipes - far too much use of commercial mixes.
        I'd try this recipe http://www.chow.com/recipes/10569 in lieu of the sawdust, er, Gebhardts and a mix of ancho and NM chile powders should substitute for the 'regular dark'. More than one kind of chile will add complex goodness to the chili. Adding chipotle is a no-brainer IMO.
        Looks like you have a handle on it! Making good chili isn't rocket science, just stay away from the topics with ground beef and taco seasoning!

        3 Replies
        1. re: DiveFan

          By using pre-ground powders of various chiles you get to create your own flavors but they're still sawdust. Use fresh chiles and prepare your own mixes, and grind you own cumin seeds too. The diff is awesome. So aromatic, you'll be tempted to eat the 'chili powder' by the spoonful. I always use at least 3 different kinds of chilis for more complexity.

          1. re: brucesw

            Absolutely agree. Buy dried chiles. Toast them in the oven. Remove ribs/seeds and grind in a spice or cofee grinder. There is a huge variety of chiles available with varying degrees of heat to choose from.

            1. re: bnemes3343

              This sounds like a great idea. Can you give some guidelines on what chile varieties/proportions we might want to start with? I'm used to the flavor profile of your run-of-the-mill commercial chili powders, but if I could get the same general taste with more zip and aromatics to it, that would be great - but what kind of peppers to use? Thanks!

        2. It's interesting to look through the 40-years of winning chili recipes (at the URL below) and see how many of them use Gebhardt Chili Powder. Quite a few.

          http://www.chilicookoff.com/Recipe/Re...

          1 Reply
          1. re: Antilope

            I have never participated in a chili cookoff and only been to one (where the public was not served the stuff prepared for the competition) but my understanding is that they use prepared mixes (don't a lot of them use Pendery's blends, too?) because of the predictable/controllable results. Use fresh chiles, er, uh, dried, and your pot will vary depending.

            bnemes3343: what's this about removing seeds and ribs????? ;).