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Royal Dining Korean Style -

Treat yourself and family or guests like royalty. The two dishes here, along with a variety of Korean ban chan dishes were served in the Korean Royal courts.

Gujeolpan, "Platter of nine delicacies" or Dish of nine dishes may have originated with the Royal Court of the Joseon period in Korea. This dish is actually named for the serving tray that the food is presented on, a covered tray segmented into eight outer sections and one center section.
The tray may be a simple but elegant lacquered wooden dish, or an elaborate affair of jade and jewels.

I posted a recipe for Gujeolpan in this thread:
http://www.chowhound.com/topics/48249...

And also in the member recipe section here:
http://www.chow.com/recipes/11427

For those who wish to get really fancy -

Here is an image for another version made with sliced daikon instead of the flat cakes:
http://mykoreankitchen.com/wp-content...
and the recipe for it:
http://mykoreankitchen.com/tag/naeng-...

This recipe is one version of Sinseollo "Food of the Mountain Gods"

http://www.chow.com/recipes/11436

And if you really want to go all out you could add
http://www.chow.com/recipes/11228
http://www.chow.com/recipes/11421
http://www.chow.com/recipes/11396

The picture below is an example of an actual Gujeolpan/Sinseollo meal.

 
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  1. The recipe link for the My Korean Kitchen recipe should be
    http://mykoreankitchen.com/tag/naeng-...

    1. Seollung Tang may have originated during the reign of King Sejong during the Joseon period. One legend tells that the king visited the Seonnongdan area where the people were praying for a good harvest while plowing a rice field. On the Kings arrival at the site of the plowing, it began raining quite heavily, and the people took that as a sign that the King’s visit had ensured they would have a plentiful harvest. An ox was butchered and cooked in various ways in honor of the King. One of the dishes served to the King was seollung tang which he praised.

      Note: This is part of a series of Korean Royal Cuisine dishes. Click on the “Korean Royal Cuisine Series” tag in the left column of the linked recipe to see more Royal Dishes.

      Recipe Link
      http://www.chow.com/recipes/11455

      1. Now a popular sausage served Korea wide, a version of this dish may have originated in the mountainous regions of Goguryeo (one of the Three Kingdoms) located in the northern portion of Korea and parts of Manchuria. It was originally made with the intestine from wild boar (pigs).

        A Ssam style serving of this dish may have been a popular Royal Court Dish during the Joseon period.

        http://www.chow.com/recipes/11460

        1. Wow! I took a look at that picture, and all I could think was "this must be hours of cooking!!" But it looks wonderful!

          6 Replies
          1. re: moh

            A full course royal meal takes a team of cooks to accomplish.
            The Korean drama Dae Jang Geum has some excellent recreations of royal kitchen operation.

            1. re: hannaone

              Yeah, I sometimes think that royal Korean cuisine takes more time than a Thomas Keller recipe. It's a lot of labor. I was staying in LA for a while a couple of years ago with my grandmother and aunts. I was getting so tired from all the cooking chores they had me do.

              1. re: hannaone

                I shall have to ask my parents to look for that drama! We had a lot of fun watching Ma shin nun TV (Delicious TV) episodes when we saw them this visit, and they do love their Korean videos.

                We have ties to minor nobility on my maternal side, apparently we are descendants of one of the third sons of the second king of the Yi dynasty (or some permutation of that). Apparently our family land holdings have become the university grounds in Pyong Yang. So if North Korea ever returns to the fold, and wants some of their nobility back, maybe someday I'll be served a full course royal meal! But I am not holding my breath.

                1. re: moh

                  Well, I'm not sure if that will happen in our lifetime. I also have some ties to some famous (according to my dad) N. Korean general on my paternal side. However, I'm not sure if I'll ever get to visit the land of my ancestors. But do not fret -- if you're ever in LA, there's a restaurant called Yong Su San that specializes in this sort of stuff. I had my LA wedding celebration dinner there. Personally I think I'm more of a fan of the peasant food as it tends to be spicier.

                  1. re: Miss Needle

                    When you say "land of my ancestors", it may be true that you might not get back to your ancestral lands (although you never know! Look at the Berlin Wall!). But Hyundai Corp is running regular tourist trips to North Korea, so you may get to North Korea! The Diamond Mountains (Kum Kwa San) are stunningly beautiful, and you had have "Pyong Yang style" Neng myun there.

                    1. re: moh

                      Really? I haven't been back to Korea in close to 30 years. I know it's changed a lot from talking to my relatives. I've been trying to get DH to come with me -- but I don't think Korean food is really his thing. Good to know that I can take a trip to N. Korea. Thanks!

            2. A full course Royal Court meal is known as Surasang (수라상) and is available at a few very upscale Korean Restaurants as hanjeongsik (full coarse meal), but it's pretty costly.

              3 Replies
              1. re: hannaone

                Ou of curiosity, how much will one of these meals cost you? It can't possibly be as bad as Per Se, could it???

                1. re: moh

                  Anywhere from $75.00 to $175.00 per person.

                  1. re: hannaone

                    Ok, so not cheap. But given the amount of work, it sounds like it would be worth it....

              2. Yuk Hoe (Yuk Hwe), Korean seasoned raw beef dish, may have originally been served in the Joseon Royal Court using ox or horse meat instead of beef.

                Recipe posted at:
                http://www.chow.com/recipes/11581

                1. Another Royal version of a common dish.
                  Jap Jae is good as prepared in many Korean restaurants. But restaurants take shortcuts such as cooking all or most of the ingredients together. In household cooking, many home cooks make the royal version in which each ingredient is prepared separately.
                  --------------------------------------------------------------
                  Royal Jap Jae
                  (Jap Jae, jop jae, jap jae bap, chop che bop, etc)

                  As with most Royal dishes, each major ingredient is prepare separately. When making this dish prepare the major ingredients one at a time, setting up all the sub-ingredients for each item so that everything is at hand and ready to add.

                  Ingredients:

                  Noodles:
                  1 12 ounce package Korean Starch Noodle (Korean vermicelli, sweet potato starch)
                  1 tablespoon Sugar
                  3 tablespoons beef or chicken broth
                  1 tablespoon sesame oil

                  Meat:
                  4 ounces Lean Beef, pork, or chicken
                  1/2 medium white or yellow onion
                  1 tablespoon sesame oil
                  Meat Marinade (See below)

                  Marinade:
                  1 tablespoon soy sauce
                  1 tablespoon pure sesame oil
                  1/4 small Asian pear
                  1 teaspoon crushed garlic
                  pepper
                  salt

                  Spinach:
                  1 bunch fresh Spinach (approximately 3 ounces)
                  1/8 teaspoon salt
                  1/2 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
                  1 teaspoon sesame oil

                  Mushroom:
                  1 medium coral mushroom
                  2 tablespoons beef or chicken broth
                  1 teaspoon sesame oil
                  Substitute: King Oyster or other large mushroom (approximately 3 ounces)

                  Doragi (Bellflower root):
                  3 ounces dried pre-cut doragi (Bellflower root)
                  3 tablespoons beef or chicken broth
                  2 Green or Spring onion
                  1 teaspoon sesame oil

                  Garnish:
                  2 eggs
                  1 teaspoon roasted Sesame seed

                  Directions:
                  Soak the dried doragi strips overnight.

                  Prepare the starch noodle:
                  Soak in cool water for about one hour. Pour off excess water then rinse in cold water. Drain thoroughly. Cut noodle into 3 inch lengths.
                  Alternate Method:
                  In a soup pot, bring 1 quart of water to a full boil. Add noodles and boil until soft. Remove from heat and rinse in cold water. Drain thoroughly. Cut noodle into 3 inch lengths.
                  Place oil in a pan over medium heat.
                  Add noodles and stir once to coat with oil.
                  Quickly add other noodle ingredients and stir fry until liquid is absorbed.
                  Remove from heat and set aside.

                  Make the Marinade:
                  Crush the pear into a smooth paste
                  In a medium mixing bowl add all marinade ingredients and mix well.

                  Prepare the meat:
                  Cut the meat into approximately 1/2 inch by 2 inch strips. Place meat in marinade and roll or mix until completely covered. Let stand at least 15 minutes.
                  Remove meat from liquid and drain. Discard remaining marinade.
                  Slice onion in thin slices (1/8th inch).
                  Spread 1 tablespoon sesame oil in a stir fry pan and place over high heat.
                  Add onion slices and stir fry about forty five (45) seconds. Remove onions from pan and set aside.
                  Add beef mixture to hot pan and quickly sear.
                  Remove from heat, mix with onion and set aside.

                  Spinach:
                  In a soup pot, bring 3 cups of water to full boil. Wash spinach in cold water, then completely immerse it in the boiling water. Remove from heat after 30 seconds and rinse immediately in cold water. Squeeze excess water from spinach.
                  Heat oil in a pan over high heat for thirty seconds.
                  Add spinach and broth, and stir fry for thirty(30) to forty five(45) seconds.
                  Remove from heat and set aside.

                  Mushroom:
                  Slice the green onion into roughly 1 to 1 1/4 inch lengths.
                  Coral:
                  Tear the coral mushroom into individual stalks (or small group if the stalks are very slender), rinse well in cold water.
                  Bring a pot of water to a rapid boil.
                  Add coral mushroom and return to boil.
                  Boil for two to three minutes, remove from heat, drain and rinse in cold water.
                  King Oyster or other large mushroom:
                  Bring a pot of water to a rapid boil.
                  Add mushroom and return to boil.
                  Boil for two to three minutes, remove from heat, drain and rinse in cold water.
                  Cut the mushroom into thin slivers lengthwise.
                  All Types mushroom:
                  Place oil into a pan over medium to high heat, heat for thirty seconds.
                  Add mushroom and stir fry three to four minutes.
                  Add broth and stir fry 1 additional minute.
                  Remove from heat and set aside.

                  Doragi
                  Rinse soaked dorgagi in cold water, then drain.
                  Place into a pot of boiling water and cook for ten to twenty minutes, until slightly softened.
                  Drain and rinse in cold water.
                  Place oil into a pan over medium to high heat, heat for thirty seconds.
                  Add doragi and stir fry three to four minutes.
                  Add broth and stir fry 1 additional minute.
                  Add cut green onion and stir fry thirty(30) seconds.
                  Remove from heat and set aside.

                  Eggs
                  Separate yolks from whites.
                  Combine yolks and whip together.
                  Pour into a hot oiled pan in a thin layer (tilt pan back and forth to cover bottom of pan).
                  Cook over medium heat until top is just firm, but bottom is not browned, flip and cook 15 to twenty seconds.
                  Remove from heat and let cool.
                  Cut into thin strips about 1/8 inch wide by 1 1/2 inch long.
                  Repeat with egg whites.

                  Final Mix:
                  Add all prepared items, except garnish, to a large salad type bowl and toss gently. Transfer to a large serving platter and garnish with alternating white and yellow egg strips. Sprinkle with remaining sesame seed and serve at room temperature with steamed white rice and ban chan.
                  Yield: approximately 5 servings
                  ------------------------------------------------

                  1. Gungjung Ddeokbokki (Palace Rice Cake)

                    Alternate Spellings: Goong Jeong Ddeokbokki, Gongjung Ddeokboki, Gungjung Tteokbokki

                    Ddeokbokki is one of the most popular snack dishes in Korea. The modern version is a spicy preparation of stir fried ddeok, or rice cake, combined with sweet potato starch noodles, shredded carrot or similar vegetable, fish cake, onions, and garlic. Ddeokbokki is probably derived from "Palace Rice Cake" (Gungjung Ddeokbokki), a special dish served to the King and certain nobles of the Chosun dynasty on the Lunar New Year. Gungjung Ddeokbokki was made by braising ddeok, meat, vegetables, eggs, and seasonings in water, and then serving it topped with gingko nuts and walnuts.

                    Servings: 6

                    Ingredients

                    1 package(16ounce) round (cylindrical) Ddeok (Rice cake)
                    6 ounces pork or beef
                    1 small carrot
                    1 small onion
                    1 large head coral mushroom (substitute 1 bunch enoki or 6 common white mushrooms)
                    5 each Pyogo beosot (Fresh or dried shiitake mushrooms)
                    3 ounces dried bagogari (gourd rind - Substitute zuchinini)
                    2 ounces mung bean sprouts
                    1 large spring onion
                    sesame oil

                    Meat and Mushroom Seasoning
                    2 teaspoons soy sauce
                    1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
                    2 cloves fresh garlic
                    1/2 teaspoon doenjang (soy bean paste)
                    1/2 teaspoon kkaesoogeum (sesame salt)
                    1/2 teaspoon sesame oil

                    Seasoning Sauce
                    1 tablespoon Sugar
                    3 tablespoons Soy sauce
                    2 cloves fresh garlic
                    1 teaspoon kkaesoogeum (sesame salt)
                    1each green onion
                    1/2 teaspoon sesame oil

                    Garnish
                    2 eggs
                    3 to 6 walnuts
                    6 to 8 gingko nuts

                    Procedure

                    Preparation:
                    Dried Vegetables -
                    Bagogari and Shiitake Mushrooms --
                    Soak separately in cool water for at least twenty minutes.

                    Mushrooms and Meat Seasoning -
                    Mince the garlic and place all the Meat and Mushroom Seasoning ingredients into a medium mixing bowl and mix well.
                    Let stand ten minutes.

                    Coral (or enoki) -
                    Tear the mushroom into individual stalks (or small group if the stalks are very slender), rinse well in cold water.

                    Other Mushrooms -
                    Thin slice from top to bottom.

                    Meat -
                    Cut the meat into thin strips about 1 1/2 inches long.
                    Add meat and mushrooms to seasoning mix and let stand fifteen to twenty minutes.

                    Vegetables
                    Wash all the vegetables in cold water.

                    Carrot
                    Cut the carrot into thirds cross wise, then thin slice each section lengthwise. Cut the slices into "match sticks".

                    Onion
                    Cut the onion in half from top to bottom, then medium slice each half (about 1/4 inch thick) also from top to bottom.

                    Zuchinni (substitute)
                    Cut crosswise into 1 1/2 inch long sections.
                    Cut each section in half lengthwise.
                    Remove seeds and seed pulp.
                    Thin slice lengthwise, then cut slices into thin "noodles".

                    Rice Cake
                    Bring a pot of water to a full boil over high heat. Add the rice cake and cook for one minute.
                    Remove the rice cake from the pot and rinse immediately in cold water.
                    Discard boil water.
                    Brush rice cake with sesame oil.

                    Eggs
                    Separate yolks from whites.
                    Combine yolks and whip together.
                    Pour into a hot oiled pan in a thin layer (tilt pan back and forth to cover bottom of pan).
                    Cook over medium heat until top is just firm, but bottom is not browned, flip and cook 15 to twenty seconds.
                    Remove from heat and let cool.
                    Cut into thin strips about 1/8 inch wide by 1 1/2 inch long.
                    Repeat with egg whites.

                    Cooking
                    Thin slice the garlic from top to bottom and place all ingredients for the seasoning sauce into a bowl and mix well.
                    Lightly coat a stir fry pan with cooking oil and heat over medium to high heat.
                    Add beef and mushroom mix to pan and stir fry 30 seconds.
                    Quickly add all other vegetables and stir fry 30 seconds more.
                    Reduce heat to medium low, add seasoning sauce, ddeok, and simmer 10 minutes.
                    Remove from heat and garnish with egg strips and nuts.
                    Serve

                    1. Tteokkaibi - Short Rib Meat Patties - Traditional

                      떡 갈비
                      Alternate Spelling: Ddeok galbi, Ddeokgalbi, Ddukkalbi, Dduk kalbi, Tteok galbi, tuk kai bi, duk gal bi, Duk kaibi

                      Tteokkaibi was a way to prepare meat that was full of flavor, and easy for the King to digest.
                      This recipe is for a traditional method to prepare this dish.

                      3 to 4 servings

                      Ingredients

                      1 pound bone in beef short ribs
                      10 ounces pork
                      5 ounces garaetteok 가래떡 or 흰떡 -- (rice cake)
                      1/2 tablespoon flour

                      Optional
                      1 tablespoon toasted sesame seed

                      Meat Seasoning:
                      1/4 Asian pear
                      1/4 small onion
                      6 cloves garlic
                      1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
                      1 1/2 tablespoons maesil cha 매실차 -- (plum tea)

                      Meat and Rice Cake Marinade:
                      4 tablespoons soy sauce
                      1 tablespoon MulYeot 물엿 (Malt Syrup)
                      1 tablespoon sugar
                      1 tablespoon refined rice wine

                      Garnish
                      3 walnuts
                      30 pine nuts -- (30 to 40)
                      2 small green onions

                      Yujang 유장 (Glaze Sauce)ingredients:
                      1 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce
                      1 tablespoon honey
                      1 tablespoon refined rice wine
                      1 tablespoon sesame oil

                      Procedure

                      Garaetteok (Rice Cake):
                      Rough chop the rice cake into small pieces.

                      Meat Seasoning:
                      Fine chop (mince) the pear, garlic, and onion. Combine all meat seasoning ingredients in a bowl and mix well.

                      Meat:
                      Short Ribs:
                      Remove the meat from the ribs.
                      Cook the bone until done. (Bake, boil, fry, or microwave - Baking or frying results in better flavoring)
                      Pound the meat with the back of a knife, then chop (mince) the meat to an almost ground consistency.

                      Pork:
                      Place the pork in a bath of cold water and soak for 20 minutes. (Removes excess blood and lightens the odor of cooking pork)
                      Cut the pork into thin slices.
                      Pound the meat with the back of a knife, then chop (mince) the meat to an almost ground consistency.

                      Mix the meat (pork and beef) with the meat seasoning (and optional sesame seeds) and let stand for ten minutes.

                      In a small bowl combine the flour and rice cake pieces and mix well.
                      Add the floured rice cake and the marinade to the meat mixture, mix well, then let stand for at least ten minutes.

                      Form the meat "dough" into bar shapes around the cooked rib bones just shorter and wider than the length and width of the rib bone sections.


                      Yujang:
                      Mix all ingredients together and let stand at least ten minutes.

                      Garnish:
                      Toast the pine nuts in a dry pan over medium heat until lightly browned.
                      Rough chop the walnuts and toasted pine nuts, then mix together.
                      Rough chop the green onion.

                      Cook:

                      Heat a lightly oiled fry pan over medium heat.

                      Add the tteokkaibi, reduce the heat to low, and cook for about 8 to 10 minutes on the first side.
                      Turn and cook about 5 to 8 minutes on the second side.
                      Baste the upper side with yujang, turn and cook about two minutes.
                      Repeat until a semi glaze forms on both sides.
                      Top with garnish then serve hot with steamed white rice and banchan.

                      Tips

                      In Korean markets with an in-house meat cutter, short ribs are usually available in either the LA cut (three or four bone pieces in a strip about 1/8 inch thick), a traditional cut (rib sections about 1 1/2 to 2 inches long with the meat butter-flyed in a long strip still attached to the rib at one end), or an "English Style" cut where the ribs are cross cut in about two inch lengths and separated.

                      For this preparation purchase the traditional cut or the "English Style" cut.

                      In other markets your meat cutter should be able to cross cut the ribs in two inch sections in an "English" cut.

                      Frozen garaetteok can be found in most Korean markets and many other Asian markets.

                      Fresh Garaetteok is available in many larger Korean markets.

                      Frozen garaetteok should be soaked in lukewarm water until soft.

                      Fresh garaetteok is soft and does not need to be soaked.

                      Commercial Maesil cha is used in this recipe as home made maesil-cha, while simple to make, takes more than a month to complete.

                      1 Reply
                      1. re: hannaone

                        Tteokkaibi - Short Rib Meat Patties - Version 2

                        This is a slightly different version of Tteok-kaibi. It still uses the pound and mince of the traditional method, but omits the rice cake and includes chicken meat.

                        3 to 4 servings

                        Ingredients
                        12 ounces boneless country style beef ribs
                        6 ounces boneless pork ribs
                        6 ounces Chicken (thigh or rib/breast)

                        Optional
                        1 tablespoon toasted sesame seed

                        Meat Seasoning:
                        1/4 Asian pear
                        1/4 small onion
                        6 cloves garlic
                        1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
                        1 1/2 tablespoons maesil cha 매실차 -- (plum tea)

                        Meat and Rice Cake Marinade:
                        4 tablespoons soy sauce
                        1 tablespoon MulYeot 물엿 (Malt Syrup)
                        1 tablespoon sugar
                        1 tablespoon refined rice wine

                        Garnish
                        3 walnuts
                        30 pine nuts -- (30 to 40)
                        2 small green onions

                        Yujang 유장 (Glaze Sauce)ingredients:
                        1 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce
                        1 tablespoon honey
                        1 tablespoon refined rice wine
                        1 tablespoon sesame oil

                        Procedure

                        Meat Seasoning:

                        Fine chop (mince) the pear, garlic, and onion. Combine all meat seasoning ingredients in a bowl and mix well.

                        Meat:

                        Beef Rib Meat:

                        Pound the meat with the back of a knife, then chop (mince) the meat to an almost ground consistency.

                        Pork:

                        Place the pork in a bath of cold water and soak for 20 minutes. (Removes excess blood and lightens the odor of cooking pork)

                        Cut the pork into thin slices.

                        Pound the meat with the back of a knife, then chop (mince) the meat to an almost ground consistency.

                        Chicken

                        Cut the chicken into thin slices.

                        Pound the meat with the back of a knife, then chop (mince) the meat to an almost ground consistency.

                        Mix the meat (beef, pork, and chicken) with the meat seasoning (and optional sesame seeds) and let stand for ten minutes.

                        Add the marinade to the meat mixture, mix well, then let stand for at least ten minutes.

                        Form the meat "dough" into bar shapes.

                        Yujang:

                        Mix all ingredients together and let stand at least ten minutes.

                        Garnish:

                        Toast the pine nuts in a dry pan over medium heat until lightly browned.

                        Rough chop the walnuts and toasted pine nuts, then mix together.

                        Rough chop the green onion.

                        Cook:

                        Heat a lightly oiled fry pan over medium heat.

                        Add the tteokkaibi, reduce the heat to low, and cook for about 8 to 10 minutes on the first side.

                        Turn and cook about 5 to 8 minutes on the second side.

                        Baste the upper side with yujang, turn and cook about two minutes.

                        Repeat until a semi glaze forms on both sides.

                        Top with garnish then serve hot with steamed white rice and banchan.