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Something's still missing in food media...

jpmcd Jan 23, 2008 06:00 AM

i do look forward to my Cooks Illustrated every other month

i really do treasure my Savuer subscription, and collection

i anticipate the NYT dining section every Wednesday

read blogs here and there, but mainly just look at the pictures

and I read Chowhound to fill the gaps, occasionally posting, but I still crave MORE

like a lot of other people, i am over the food network, try to get love my fill of food tv with weekend afternoons of PBS and the occasional Bourdain - i totally cracked up during Bittman's show sun night with Michel Richard (maybe it was a repeat but i hadn't seen it before) but still these shows are on so infrequently!

and Top Chef is not on til next season...

SO WHAT's MISSING??? i can't figure it out...should I just eat out more and visit restaurants of chefs I admire? is there an expert chef blog that I don't know about? i think i'd like more insider info from the real pros, maybe?

thoughts? anyone else feel in the same boat? what do you wish there was more of?

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  1. g
    gmonkey RE: jpmcd Jan 23, 2008 08:22 AM

    Part of the beauty of being a foodie is the eating part. Eat more. Eat something you saw in one of those magazines that took your breath away or something you've never eaten before. Try one new restaurant that looks appealing to you, yet you've never heard anything about. Experiment at home by making dishes you like at your favorite restaurants in your very own kitchen. And, if you can, travel.

    2 Replies
    1. re: gmonkey
      jennywinker RE: gmonkey Jan 23, 2008 09:47 AM

      Oooooo, Yes!! Travel!! I've found that my hobbies and activities have evolved to all incorporate an aspect of food: gardening, home cooking, cooking classes (I'm a volunteer assistant so I can "afford" to do a lot of these), traveling (as much as possible), reading about food and food people (memoirs, biographies, novels, food origins, food politics), food movies, joined a CSA, shopping the farmer's markets, scoping out local artisanal products (at home and while traveling), destination dining. Even did a weekend food radio show for a year. Seems a little obsessive, but oh well.

      1. re: jennywinker
        jennywinker RE: jennywinker Jan 24, 2008 10:32 AM

        I could also add that I work in a food-oriented business. It's not exactly a dream job, but it is another way I stay connected to food trends, food policy, etc.

        If I had more time, I would explore more on epicurious.com. I also like culinate.com. That usually leads me down some food rabbithole or another.

    2. dagoose RE: jpmcd Jan 23, 2008 10:10 AM

      I feel the same way. Here are some ways I fill the void: Start a blog, offering your own input, volunteer at your local farmers market, experiment in your kitchen, testing things out.

      Read other peoples blogs--they are great....often can lead you to more sources. There are amateur blogs, but there are also blogs by restaurant insiders, food writers, etc. From Ruhlman's blog to our local chocolate store, there is an endless world out there. I do restaurant marketing, and in addition to my own personal blog, I host blogs for the restaurants I work for, so maybe check out your local restaurants.

      I am also considering taking on the early 90s idea of a zine and starting a local food zine...so what is it you most want to know about food? or read about food?

      3 Replies
      1. re: dagoose
        jpmcd RE: dagoose Jan 24, 2008 04:25 PM

        by zine, do u mean magazine? In general I am looking for more expert advice from professionals and industry leaders - i also want a peak inside the chef world and how they eat and cook - I am admittedly fascinated by places chefs gather off duty, like Blue Ribbon (dont know if this still happens)

        1. re: jpmcd
          ccbweb RE: jpmcd Jan 24, 2008 05:05 PM

          I think you start running into the Heisenberg uncertainty principle here.....by observing something, you change it. The more we peel back the cover on the life of chefs, the more they're going to alter what they do and then we're not watching anything like what we set out to watch anymore.

          What sort of advice are you looking for? And from which industry?

          1. re: ccbweb
            jpmcd RE: ccbweb Jan 24, 2008 05:40 PM

            i definitely don't want that to happen - but I do love shows like Charlie Rose when he interviews chefs - i would like to learn a little bit more from them and about them bc they know so much and i find them so fascinating

            when i say "industry" i mean the broader food industry, i guess more specifically restaurant industry experts

      2. c
        ClaireWalter RE: jpmcd Jan 24, 2008 07:54 PM

        Re "is there an expert chef blog that I don't know about..?" Check out http://www.chefsblogs.com/directory/i... and http://www.superchefblog.com/ with links to many, many chefs' and foodie sites and blogs. Having my own culinary food blog, I appreciate other comments on this topic encouraging you to check out foodies' blogs, maintained for the love good food -- certainly not for money.

        1 Reply
        1. re: ClaireWalter
          jennywinker RE: ClaireWalter Jan 25, 2008 01:00 PM

          That is so cool. Thanks for posting those sites. Except now I'm going to have to quit my job before they fire me.

        2. w
          waldrons RE: foodiechica Feb 2, 2008 08:29 PM

          There is another food/travel website launching soon, called www.foodtrekker.com. It's sponsored by the International Culinary Tourism Association.

          Susan

          1. im_nomad RE: jpmcd Jan 30, 2008 01:02 PM

            how about movies or some fiction for a bit of fantasy instead of all the "real life" stuff?

            I do not work in the food industry (but i do bake and sell on the side)....but I still dream about it...so i love to read novels where the primary characters are chefs and what not. Same goes for movies....

            1. applehome RE: jpmcd Feb 1, 2008 01:47 PM

              Personally, I think food is more of a participant sport.

              Part 1 is travel. Going to Ecuador for the ceviche is great, but finding out what's locally available - maybe an Ecuadorian family has started something in some part of the city, and all you have to do is find it - that's almost as great.

              Part 2 is cooking. Saveur and CI are inspirations. With each article or recipe comes a flood of research and ideas of my own to try. Research may be cross-referencing other recipes to see what the key ingredients or steps are for that dish, but to see what people change, as well. Then it's time to get creative!

              Also - have you read everything Trillin has written? Steingarten? Reichl... and on and on... lots of really great food writings out there in books.

              1. limster RE: jpmcd Feb 2, 2008 02:19 PM

                I wish there was more chowhounding.

                It's great to see continual detailed coverage of the same places over and over again, because an experience at a restaurant can vary considerably, depending on the staff on duty, changes in the menu etc.

                But there are tons of places out there that no one ever talks about in any media. You only read about them in the phone book. We have no idea if they're good or bad. A chowhound doesn't just follow existing information to the good chow. A chowhound *creates* information where there was none, by applying his/her chow savvy to explore unknowns and in the process find new deliciousness. It might mean eating a lot of average stuff, but there's also the thrill of critical exploration. We need lots more of that.

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