HOME > Chowhound > Cookware >
What's your latest food quest? Tell us about it
TELL US

Stove recommendation

Kosmonaut Jan 20, 2008 11:05 AM

We need to upgrade the kitchen in our Victorian house as per SF city inspector instructions, and they've stated that we need to remove the Montague stove that came with the house. The problem is that it's a commercial stove which means that it has pilot lights which are always on, is missing a bunch of safety features, and needs a dedicated vent which we have but which is not up to code.

Anyway, we're looking for a gas stove that is no more than 30 inches wide, and is metallic in color (to match our stainless refrigerator.)

I honestly don't know much about stoves. Do I want the self-cleaning oven feature? I don't know what practical features we need or would be really useful.

Thanks much!

  1. e
    Egger Jan 20, 2008 05:50 PM

    We bought a SS Capital Range 30" Gas Self Cleaning oven and are happy with it. It has a built in Rotisserie which we like. It also has a 25,000 BTU WOK Burner as the 5'th Burner, and that is another good feature.

    1. Candy Jan 20, 2008 07:38 PM

      I would never dream of not having a self cleaning oven. It is an absolute must.

      1 Reply
      1. re: Candy
        r
        renov8r Jan 21, 2008 06:09 AM

        I won't criticize Candy's comment, but I know lots of people that have used the self cleaning feature at most once and decided 'never again'. The way self-cleaning works is it incinerates anything spilled -- cheese, sugar, fats all emit some mighty unpleasant odors as they are incinerated. Uses a lot of energy and ties up the oven for quite a long time too.

        There are stats about "appliance usage" that suggest lots of people NEVER clean their ovens period -- no wipe-ups, no "Easy-Off", no "self-cleaning cycle". They just let the grunge/ash build up until something stops working or they move...

        The vast majority of ovens have self-cleaning as a feature mostly because it is easy to implement.

        Other features take a lot more engineering/parts : high output, multi-mode convention, rotisserie, steam assist. These can add a lot more cost.

        For someone has had lived with a commercial range (which is what Montaque makes), I would thing appearance is one consideration, but also performance -- in addition to fairly high output, Montys have had a really heavy-duty quality that is hard to duplicate in standard ranges. They are not made for home use, but they are made to last decades in commercial applications. Other ranges may have a similar look, but the residential Wolfs, Vikings, and similar offerings for homes have far different approaches to insulating the oven to allow safe installation next to flammable walls/cabinets, have doors that won't burn to the touch, meet energy use guidelines and a long list of things that are invisible...

        As a practical matter, the OP needs to get the ventilation up to code, and that could prove quite costly, especially in an older Victorian home, even more so in SF, known for its high housing costs. It would be prudent to get that work done first and then go shopping for the replacement appliance, with what is "left over" in the budget.

        Good luck!

      2. sirregular Jan 20, 2008 07:46 PM

        There are many options, ranging from inexpensive to "You want WHAT for that stove?" for stainless 30" stand-alones. Since aesthetics seem to be the most important feature, you should head to an appliance store and check out their selection of stainless steel gas stand-alones and find something that best matches your refrigerator.

        Recipes, Restaurant Reviews and More - My Blog: http://www.epicureforum.com

        1. m
          medicinewheel8 Jan 23, 2008 10:02 AM

          I have a WOLF dual cooking. Gas top with electric oven. I love it! I feel it is well worth the money.

          1 Reply
          1. re: medicinewheel8
            a
            appliance guy Jan 25, 2008 07:36 PM

            Hi, What brand of fridge do you have? what is your goal for this range, like medicinewheel8 WOLF is nice but who has thousands to spend? do you? Consider the fact that there is over 200 models for you too look at, so when looking consider all your options, based on what i have just read and your style of home i would suggest maybe a period style peice if price is no option or next level down would be kitchenaid style slide in or freestanding at a great price, or if you wish to just have a nice looking range think maybe whirlpool or GE profile. all the best.

          2. NYchowcook Jan 26, 2008 08:04 AM

            I bought a moderate priced 30" Maytag range/oven with one super-high burner, two moderate and one low and a fifth ultra low. I find it's useful to have at least one burner at high power -- a good sear, boil water fast, etc.
            I cook alot and have no complaints (though I would someday like a large stove.) It's self-cleaning, which I use occasionally (I'm a never clean the oven kinda gal)

            You'll want to check the BTU's of the burners. I liked that the fifth burner is very low BTU -- good for holding sauces, melting butter, etc. Also liked having burner tops that spread contiguously across, so you can slide rather than lift heavy pots off the heat.
            Consumer Reports rates some models and offers suggestions. My friends swear they'll never buy stainless again 'cause they're so hard to keep looking good.

            1. s
              sueatmo Jan 26, 2008 01:28 PM

              I'm not sure if this advice still stands, but I have been told that gas self-cleaning ovens are not very good at cleaning. If I understand this correctly, the reason for dual-fuel ranges is to have a good, electric self-cleaning oven paired with a preferred gas cooktop. I do use my self-clean cycle and I am thankful for it. When you cannot clean your oven, you get smoking and burned smells every time you bake. With a self clean feature, your oven stays cleaner.

              Show Hidden Posts