HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >
Brewing beer, curing meat, or making cheese? Tell us about it
TELL US

need a recipe for rib roast

m
melicristie Jan 11, 2008 08:17 PM

Hi thereI need a recipe for rib roast preferably oven...I never made this before so I have no idea how to prepare season or cook it. I NEED STEP BY STEP INFO ON HOW TO DO THIS!! I am making smoked gouda mashed potatoes and mac salad as sides.Any ideas?

  1. l
    lmk_tampa Jan 12, 2008 07:39 AM

    I've made this planty a times and it never ceases to impress me. Never had better Rib Roast and I lived in Argentina for 15 years. Hope you like it.

    1 (4-bone-in) standing rib roast, preferably from the loin end
    Canola / Olive oil, to coat roast
    Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to cover entire roast (don't skimp on the fresh cracked pepper or salt as this will crisp in the skin and fuse all throughout the meat)
    1 cup water (optional for sauce)
    1 cup red wine (optional for sauce)
    4 fresh sage leaves (optional for sauce)

    Remove any plastic wrapping or butcher's paper from the roast. Wrap dry towels loosely on top of the roast. This will help to draw moisture away from the meat. Place into a refrigerator at approximately 50 to 60 percent humidity and between 34 and 38 degrees F (fancy for stick it in the Veggie Drawer. Change the towels daily for 3 days. You will notice the towels will be a little damp, this is good, as the towels are drawing moisture for the meat (kinda like a pseudo aging). Don't worry, there will be PLENTY of juices in the meat even though you draw moisture for 3 days. When ready to cook, bring out the meat and let sit for 1-2 hours or until it's room temperature (VERY IMPORTANT).

    Remove the roast from the refrigerator and rub with oil. Remember to rub the bones with oil, as well. Once the roast is completely coated with oil cover the roast with kosher salt (kosher please, no iodine), about half a teaspoon per bone. Next, rub with freshly ground pepper to coat the surface. Place the roast over a glass bake-ware dish fitted with a rack
    (I bought a deep rectangular casserole dish and a wire rack to put on top of it at Walmart and it works great). The rack is essential for drainage. The key is to have as much of the meat NOT touch as possible, therefore, when the meat sits on the rack, it eliminates as much contact surface area as possible, allowing the heat to circulate underneath and all around the meat. This will also allow for the drippings to fall into the baking dish but the meat will not touch the drippings. We'll make a sauce from the drippings.

    Turn the oven to 250 degrees F.

    Finally, place a probe thermometer into the center of the roast and set for 118 degrees (Buy an electric thermometer with a fire proof probe; the best thing i ever bought). Put the roast and the bake-ware dish onto the oven. Turn the oven down to 200 degrees F and roast until internal temperature is achieved.

    Once temperature is met (about 4-7 hours depending on the size of the meat and your oven), remove the roast, cover with aluminum foil (the whole thing) and let it rest until it reaches 130 degrees (can take up to 45 mins, the juices and internal heat of the meat will continue to cook until 130). Turn oven up to 500 degrees F. When it's preheated, place roast back in for about 10 minutes or until you've achieved your desired crust. Remove and transfer roast to a cutting board. Keep covered with foil until ready to serve.

    SAUCE (Made it once, not too impressive. Meat by itself is outstanding if you ask me)
    Degrease the juices in the glass pan. Place the pan over low heat and deglaze with 1 cup of water. Add the wine and reduce by half. Roll the sage leaves in between your fingers to release the flavors and aroma. Add to the sauce and cook for 1 minute. Strain and serve on the side.

    The recipe seems long, but it's really easy. Just 3 days of prep taking the moisture of the meat (i've done 2 days before and it's good too). Oven at really low temp, having the meat elevated from the baking dish by the rack as much as possible for 5-8 hours), let sit in aluminum foil to keep itself cooking; slam it back in the oven at the hottest temp to make a crust outside of it and that's it. Try it, you won't be disappointed.

    1. f
      foodie06 Jan 12, 2008 07:25 AM

      I like Ina Garten's Recipe for Sunday Rib Roast with Horseradish Mustard Sauce. Its a simple preparation-i.e. just salt and pepper but the method for cooking the meat makes a delicious roast. The sauce is delicious as well.

      http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recip...

      1. b
        bw2082 Jan 12, 2008 06:58 AM

        I make a paste with minced garlic, fresh thyme, black pepper, and olive oil. Then I liberally salt the meat and rub the paste all over. I throw some carrots, onions, and celery into a baking pan and put the roast on top. Then I cook it at 375-400 until the temp comes up to 130 degrees. Then I take it out and let it rest for 20 minutes or so before carving. Some people might like to use a lower heat method, but I've tried both ways and the results both are acceptable imo.

        2 Replies
        1. re: bw2082
          h
          hungry_pangolin Jan 12, 2008 07:07 AM

          Just curious, don't you find that the garlic in the paste burns and gets bitter at that temperature for that length of time? I rub a number of broken cloves of garlic over the outside of the roast beforehand to get the garlic flavour.

          1. re: hungry_pangolin
            b
            bw2082 Jan 12, 2008 09:12 AM

            no I have not had it burn at all. Actually I should have said i grate it on a microplane instead of minced. Anyway it sort of forms a roasted garlic crust on the outside.

        Show Hidden Posts