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What's an Oki Dog/Kosher Burrito like?

  • m
  • Mr. Chow May 1, 2001 11:16 PM
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Working Downtown, I see the signs for the Oki Dog and the Kosher Burrito; I'm often tempted to stop and try, but I have no idea what they are (i realize they are two very different food items). Are they worth a try?

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  1. Kosher Burrito. Yes yes yes! At the very least, it is worth trying. Pastrami doused with chili (no beans) with cheese, pickles and onions inside a flour tortilla. If you're afraid of cholesterol or extremely health conscious, than you probably want to stay away but otherwise, don't be scared of the juices, ie: grease that will eventually soak out the buttom half of your burrito if you wait too long to finish it.

    1. As best I can recall, the Oki Dog, which by the way you absolutely must try, is two hot dogs, pastrami, chili, cheese and some Okinawan fried vegetables in a flour tortilla.

      Best eaten on a wooden picnic table among the whores and punks of Hollywood. But that location is sadly lamented.

      3 Replies
      1. re: Samo

        samo, has the location in hollywood closed? alos, is that the one on fairfax across the street from lola's?

        1. re: kevin

          My memory is quite unreliable. There was a great Oki Dog shop on either Sunset or, more likely, Hollywood Boulevard (help me out, Michael). Possibly this was the original. It closed and a few other shops opened, including the ones on Fairfax (860; 323 655-4166) and Pico (5056 West; 323 938-4369) and an undercover operation on Santa Monica Boulevard a few blocks west of Bundy, in a mini-mall. The clandestine shop closed about two years ago, but the other two are apparently open.

          1. re: kevin

            That Oki Dog is still there. Just passed it a few days ago and was wondering about it.

        2. An Oki Dog/Kosher burrito is like a light, spring, Pacific breeze wafting above undulating hills of California poppies.