HOME > Chowhound > Pacific Northwest >

Discussion

Okonomiyaki at Boom Noodle? (SEA)

  • gmm Jan 5, 2008 09:45 PM
  • 17
  • Share

There doesn't seem to be many (if any) places in Seattle that serve okonomiyaki, but I noticed they do have it on Boom Noodles menu. Anyone tried it, and is it any good?

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
Posting Guidelines | FAQs | Feedback
Cancel
  1. I have tried it and I liked it a lot. But to be fair it is the only okonomiyaki I have ever had.

    4 Replies
    1. re: idod

      I tried it and didn’t like it much. It is precooked and you don’t get your choice of “fillings”.

      1. re: Charles

        pre...cooked? okonomiyaki? That really comes close to being a crime against humanity.

        1. re: terrier

          I tried it too, on Sunday. Not what I was expecting- it's an appetizer, and a little finnicky for my tastes, I tend to think of okonomiyaki as pretty much the Japanese equivalent of pizza, not a "small plate" kinda thing, but there you go.

          I was so excited to find okonomiyaki on a menu in my neighborhood, I did a jig, but I have to say I am disappointed now. Why won't anyone in Seattle serve it?????

          1. re: pusherman

            Daimonji in Georgetown serves it

            It's not much of a place, certainly not a top spot, picky eaters will not like it.
            But they're well priced and they serve Okonomiyaki.
            (I get it every time I go)

    2. I could be sorely mistaken - in which case, I apologize in advance - but I thought I heard that the new "crepe" place on the corner across from the International District Post Office was doing/going to do okonomiyaki? This site was lastly a hair salon.....colorful poster in the window, but I haven't looked at it up close.....

      1. Okonomiyaki is pure comfort food for me. The version that I long for doesn't seem to exist anymore. It was made on street carts in Japan of the '50s - very thin. What they're making in Japan now is mostly very thick with all sorts of things mixed in. (This is somewhat analogous to wanting NY pizza and only having Chicago available.)
        The pre-made frozen stuff that some restaurants deep fry is criminal. What restaurant would serve a microwaved frozen pizza?
        The closest thing that gives me satisfaction for my yearning is good Korean pa joon. I love HoSoonYi's.

        1. I just tried this Boom Noodle place last week and had very mixed impressions in general, but let's get to the okonomiyaki.

          I'd never tried okonomiyaki before and knew next to nothing about it, but the first thing I noticed was a very noticeable fishy smell when it was brought to the table. I didn't even have to get my nose all up in there to notice it. It wasn't necessarily unpleasant, and being an okonomiyaki n00b I was unsure of what to expect--is a fishy odor a desirable trait in this dish?

          The texture itself was spongy and nondescript, and the little wedges were covered in a mess of julienned stuff--Boom Noodle reeeeally loves julienning things. It didn't dazzle me, but it didn't offend me either, although after reading about how so many people are diehard okonomiyaki fiends, I think Boom Noodle missed the mark.

          4 Replies
          1. re: young and hungry

            I've seen okonomiyaki with bonito flakes on top - that's always going to smell really fishy. Not sure if Boom Noodle's dish has them, though.

            1. re: akq

              You got it, Boom puts the bonito flakes on the top, which can smell pretty intensely fishy. I can't stand the stuff, but our cat loves it.

              1. re: akq

                Shaved Bonito does not smell fishy unless its picked-up moisture and rotted.

                1. re: kirkj

                  I think "fishy" is one of those person-by-person sensitivity issues. I know what you mean - bonito flakes don't smell "bad" fishy to me, generally, but they do smell fishy and so I think if you're not expecting any fish smell and you get something covered in bonito flakes, it might be off-putting.

            2. I've never had it, but after reading this I wanted to make it:
              http://lunchinabox.net/2007/11/19/mak...

              1. I saw from the menu in koji osakaya that they have okonomiyaki too... I haven't tried it though, but in general the food there is quite ok.

                2 Replies
                1. re: enylia

                  Thanks for the tip! I've never heard of that place before, but the menu looks good. Sadly for me, only seafood okonomiyaki, but looks like lots of other good options. Anyone been there?

                  In a similar vein -- had a good meal at Maekawa last night, not great but good and cheap and a fun place. But left me pining for the amazing Biwa in Portland that I visited last weekend...who's pork belly appetizer is one of the best things I've ever put in my mouth, wow.

                  1. re: pusherman

                    you might try Nijo's (a couple blocks south of Koji) instead of Koji, go especially at happy hour if you're looking for cheap..at Koji i tend to stick to the tonkatsu (pork bone) ramen lunch special and avoid their tempura, yakisoba, beef, sushi...i do like the pork belly/hardboiled egg at Maekawa but not the other things i've tried there

                2. I had the okonomiyaki at Boom this past weekend. Okonomiyaki happens by to be one of my favorite things, but this is literally the worst okonomiyaki i've ever had. It tasted like a bisquick pancake which was topped off with a few shreds of cabbage and a bits of cooked pork halfway through cooking and then flipped over (instead of the ingredients being mixed into the batter before cooking), and was thick, spoungy, and doughy (which is just wrong). The inauthenticity I can get over, but the okonomiyaki was just simply not good.*

                  The okonomiyaki at Imo in Pioneer Square (in the old Bonzai spot), however, totally hits the spot.

                  *I've liked most other things I've tried at Boom on several other occasions, however.