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Ceasar Dressing

e
emilief Dec 29, 2007 01:33 PM

I am making ceasar salad for guests- one is lactose intolerant. My usual recipe for the dressing has anchovies, no egg but lots of parmesan ( from the Fig's Table). I have found other recipes in cookbooks where the salad dressing itself has no parmesan but has raw egg or an egg cooked for 30 seconds. Does anyone have a good recipe for cheese- free ceasar salad dressing. Also, how do you do this 30 second boiled egg without overcooking it? Is it really neccessary if I use fresh organic eggs??

  1. s
    smtucker Dec 29, 2007 01:58 PM

    I have never heard of a ceasar dressing with cheese. Usually a small amount of parmesian is shredded on top of the salad, so it is easy to omit from the lactose intolerant guest's plate. I use a raw egg since I would never serve a raw salad to someone with a compromised immune system. Be careful to not allow the egg to touch the outside of the shell to reduce the risk even further. Of course, if you have a young person or a pregnant woman eating at your table, coddling the egg would be prudent.

    1. pitu Dec 29, 2007 07:01 PM

      I make two kinds of ceasar - one from the Zuni Cafe book, with raw eggs (from the farmer's market lady I trust), parm, anchovies ETC It's a fantastic recipe that walks you through all the steps with great details.
      I don't think it would be ceasar without the cheese - I thought that's an important part of the blend - but of course you can add it on top if someone needs to avoid cheese.
      (Although some people who can't take milk or ice cream can eat hard aged cheeses.)

      The other is from Angelica's Kitchen - their vegan "sea ceasar", using soft tofu, smoked dulse, and nori strips. Very different dressing, but also delicious. The book is called "The Angelica Home Kitchen", maybe you can google around for the recipe if you're interested.

      2 Replies
      1. re: pitu
        Mild Bill Dec 29, 2007 07:09 PM

        Wow! Three people spelling Caesar wrong!

        Now search! Search like the wind!

        :-)

        1. re: Mild Bill
          maria lorraine Dec 29, 2007 10:42 PM

          And actually, it's Cesar. After Cesar Cardini.
          Render unto Cesar the things that are Cesar's.

      2. l
        Linda513 Dec 30, 2007 04:45 AM

        I use mayo in my dressing in place of the raw egg. I do, however, use a lot of parmesan cheese so I can't help you there.

        1. b
          bnemes3343 Dec 30, 2007 04:55 AM

          A traditional caesar salad dressing does not contain any cheese. The cheese, either grated or shavings (better) is added to the salad at the end.

          1. sixelagogo Dec 30, 2007 07:31 AM

            we used to coddle our raw eggs for ceasar salads at the restaurant i worked at for reasons being that the shell is the most salmonella prone area of the egg...We submerged eggs for 30 seconds, then placed them in an ice bath...the white will show minor signs of cooking (slight opacity around the edges) though I never thought it affected the finished product.
            Since we made each salad (and it's dressing) to order, the Parmesan was always added last.

            1 Reply
            1. re: sixelagogo
              pikawicca Dec 30, 2007 03:06 PM

              Coddling the egg is traditional for consistency reasons -- it does not cook the egg anywhere near enough to render it "safer."

            2. maria lorraine Dec 30, 2007 03:03 PM

              From my understanding, Parmagiano Reggiano, because of the way it's made and because of its long aging, has little or no lactose. So the cheese isn't a problem.

              Here's one source of info about that, though there are many more:
              http://www.relishmag.com/article/98.html
              "Thanks to the method of making Parmigiano and the long curing process, there is no lactic acid left in the finished product, so lactose intolerant folks can eat it with gusto."

              Always best to check with your guest, however.

              Also, I use a raw egg yolk (no white), though I live in an area where there is almost no egg-borne salmonella.

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