HOME > Chowhound > Los Angeles Area >

conveyor belt sushi bar

c
Christie Jan 15, 2001 01:45 AM

I am looking for that sushi bar in Little Tokyo that has the sushi on a conveyor belt. Anyone know what I'm talking about and where it is located? Thank you. This is my first time visiting chowhounds. I randomly checked one of the "bibimbap" entries and was glad to see someone mentioned Nam Kang, my favorite hole in the wall, on seventh st, off Vermont.

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. s
    SexLoveRockSushi RE: Christie Jan 15, 2001 04:25 PM

    Hopefully I'll never find out what place in Little Tokyo has conveyor belt sushi. Why would you want to go to a place like that, other than for the riduiculous novelty? I remember walking into one of these conveyor belt so-called sushi places in Kagoshima, Japan and after seeing the distinctly poor quality of the oxidized fish making their rounds we immediately walked out and went to a real sushi restaurant. No true sushi aficionado would ever go to one of these inauthentic, low quality places more than once. These places are on par with all you can eat 'sushi' (and I use that term loosely here) buffets. Low on any authentic sushi and high on these Americanized preconceived notions of sushi such as the dreaded California rolls, Dynamite, smoked salmon and avocado fried rolls, and the like. The sushi at these types of places is always several notches below a real authentic sushi bar, hence the usual cheap prices at these pre-frozen rancid fish outlets. If you want good sushi in Little Tokyo\Downtown area spend more money and go to R-23, Sushi Gen, and several other good sushi bars in the area.

    1 Reply
    1. re: SexLoveRockSushi
      d
      Deb H. RE: SexLoveRockSushi Jan 15, 2001 05:36 PM

      In general, the only conveyor belt sushi places I'd recommend would be wildly popular ones with a line of people waiting to get in (avoid going in unless it's already full or near-full). That way you can be pretty well assured that the fish going around is fresh. These kinds of places generally have low cost going for them, and you can order off the menu if you've got special requests (then you can see that it's freshly made). So you're not just stuck with weird rolls and post-prime nigiri going around and around...

      I agree that your best sushi experience is probably going to be in a true sushi place (not a conveyor belt place), but sometimes the conveyor belt places are fun for a quick bite. There are a number of popular and good ones all over Japan.

      Best,
      Deb H.

    2. m
      Michael Shure RE: Christie Jan 15, 2001 04:35 PM

      The place is called "Flying Fish" and it is great, despite what your other replier may have opined. I would rather eat here than Sushi Gen, it is that good. R-23 however, is better. It may be a novelty, but some novelties can be surprisingly good, not to mention the fact that you can taste some rolls without having to order the whole roll. Enjoy it.

      1. m
        Michael S RE: Christie Jan 15, 2001 04:35 PM

        The place is called "Flying Fish" and it is great, despite what your other replier may have opined. I would rather eat here than Sushi Gen, it is that good. R-23 however, is better. It may be a novelty, but some novelties can be surprisingly good, not to mention the fact that you can taste some rolls without having to order the whole roll. Enjoy it.

        1. 2
          2chez mike RE: Christie Jan 21, 2001 12:31 PM

          I grew up in New Jersey and when I was a kid there was this coffee shop type place called the "Hamburger Express". There was a Lionel train track that circled out from the kitchen and around the inside of the counter. When your food was ready the cook would put the plate on one of the flat bed railroad cars and send it out. It would stop right in front of where you were sitting.

          Show Hidden Posts