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Noodles

t
taco titan Dec 21, 2007 10:19 AM

Asian that is. What is your favorite style of Asian noodle ? The best place to get it in the U.S.. Some of mine are, Ollie's, Penny's, Joy Yees's.

  1. b
    burritobelle Jan 1, 2008 01:59 PM

    Taco Titan -- pretty much all of the little Asian grocery stores in the ID seem to sell those wide, fresh noodles. Sorry, I dont know any of their names! But Uwajimaya has them too. Ask for the fresh noodles -- they come very simply packaged: on a little Styrofoam plate, wrapped in plastic, with a little typed out label. They're bright white and cushy looking

    1. l
      link_930 Dec 31, 2007 12:28 PM

      Hamheung naengmyun by far. I love the chewiness.

      1. p
        piccola Dec 30, 2007 09:30 AM

        I don't really like angel hair/vermicelli, though I'll eat them in summer rolls. But I definitely prefer thick and/or wide noodles, whether they're made of rice, wheat or another starch.

        Soba is one exception, if only because the heft and texture of buckwheat make up for the thinness.

        1. hannaone Dec 30, 2007 08:58 AM

          Naengmyon, the Korean cold noodle soup with usually buckwheat or arrowroot noodles served in an ice cold broth and topped with sliced beef and boiled egg..

          1. t
            taco titan Dec 25, 2007 05:06 PM

            Can you give me the name of the place in Seatle ? And are they like Shanghi noodles ?

            1. b
              burritobelle Dec 25, 2007 10:16 AM

              Oooh, Asian noodles are my FAVORITE. I love the wide, flat noodles used in Pad See Ew. They sell them fresh in Seattle's International District. I also love cold, slippery soba noodles. And udon is such a comfort food -- I love those thick buckwheat udon noodles.

              2 Replies
              1. re: burritobelle
                stellamystar Dec 26, 2007 07:14 AM

                I also like Pad See Ew noodles. yummy! Are they the same or similar to the Chow Fun noodles in Chinese cooking? yummy....

                1. re: stellamystar
                  cee Dec 29, 2007 09:35 AM

                  same noodles. they're called "sen yai" in thai.

              2. c
                crt Dec 25, 2007 06:35 AM

                My favorite is rice noodle(s), aka rice stick, of any size. Another favorite is the 'glass noodle(s)', aka cellophane noodle(s).

                On the flip side, I will tolerate egg noodle(s) as long as it is of a very thin variety. Too thick, yuck. I really hate chow mein that is made with a thick variety of egg noodle. And there are just to many Chinese restaurants, fast food & sit down, that use that variety. It's hard to find one that doesn't (except Panda Express, love theirs). Many don't know that good (authentic Chinese) chow mein, and fried rice, should have noodles and rice that is a bit 'charred' from adding those ingredients only after the wok they are being cooked in is extremely well heated/very hot. That's the whole idea behind wok cooking with regard to chow mein & fried rice.

                1. soypower Dec 25, 2007 05:08 AM

                  some weeks i'm all about the thick rice noodles you find in pad si ew, then i'll get a hankering for the thin egg noodles in wonton noodle soup, then i'll be in love with fresh ramen, and then i'll hit a korean/chinese restaurant and eat nothing but hand-pulled noodles in jajangmyun and jampong for the rest of the month. then there's that crispy pan fried noodle w/ seafood that i get at a couple chinese places around here...oh, and then i'll get into a japanese frame of mind and do a few days of udon noodle soup and cold soba. i do also like the slimy texture of sweet potato noodles in japchae.

                  so i think the question for me is, what kind of noodle is my favorite at this moment?

                  2 Replies
                  1. re: soypower
                    Chocolatechipkt Dec 30, 2007 08:49 AM

                    I love those thick rice noodles! I've found a fresh source for them locally, so I've pan fried them and used them in soups ... delicious! Oh, and the rice noodles used in shrimp rice noodle crepes in dim sum. This is making me hungry.

                    http://areyouhungryyet.blogspot.com/2007/01/spicy-basil-chicken_17.html

                    http://areyouhungryyet.blogspot.com/2...

                    1. re: soypower
                      r
                      rfneid Jan 3, 2008 02:46 PM

                      Hey, soypower - you've saved me the trouble of composing a long reply to this post. Just add my name to yours.

                    2. revsharkie Dec 22, 2007 10:18 AM

                      To get in a restaurant, I like Rad Nah.

                      But my very favorite are the cold Japanese noodles called somen. I've never, ever seen them in a restaurant, but I can get the dried noodles in Asian food stores even out here, and I know how to make them myself.

                      4 Replies
                      1. re: revsharkie
                        j
                        justagthing Dec 24, 2007 09:03 AM

                        In S. CA., there are many places that you can order cold noodles, great for a hot day.

                        1. re: justagthing
                          MikeG Dec 27, 2007 04:30 PM

                          I don't know if they're only on menus during the warm months or whether that's just when I notice them, but ditto for NYC.

                          1. re: justagthing
                            b
                            b0ardkn0t Jan 3, 2008 02:53 PM

                            Oh I so love the cool buckwheat/soba and udon noodles on a hot day, as well as in a broth.
                            I get my fix at Cal Poly Pomona(because I have to as I'm a student here and it's on campus).
                            But really for the best noodles anywhere in the US, the San Gabriel Valley(just east of downtown LA) is the place to go, particularly Alhambra, Arcadia, and Rowland Heights, San Gabriel, Monterey Park, Chino Hills, Gardena, etc. they are packed with noodles houses, like Q Noodle House(yum)
                            I cannot rave enough about them and their XLB at various locales.
                            You will find it a litte harder to come by to find all or even authentic hand made noodles in places farther east, Flushing in New York area, can't come close, SF is good, but LA noodle houses are still a notch above those in SF.
                            We've had some lively boards on this topic in the Los Angeles area boards:

                            http://www.chowhound.com/topics/359048
                            http://www.chowhound.com/topics/472588
                            http://www.chowhound.com/topics/475391
                            http://www.chowhound.com/topics/470736
                            http://www.chowhound.com/topics/465931
                            http://www.chowhound.com/topics/473571
                            http://www.chowhound.com/topics/300860

                            1. re: b0ardkn0t
                              b
                              b0ardkn0t Jan 3, 2008 05:29 PM

                              also
                              http://www.chowhound.com/topics/469545
                              you can also find customer reviews at yelp.com

                        2. r
                          RevImmigrant Dec 21, 2007 12:18 PM

                          Szechuan noodles are my favorite, but I don't know where to get that in the US since I don't live there. I make them at home.

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