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Best Osso Bucco recipe?

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We've made it a number of times, all good, but never "outstanding". Any great recipes to share? We want to make it for our Christmas dinner celebration with foodie son and family.

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  1. Maybe you could start the ball rolling by outlining the recipes that you have used. Basically it is braised veal shanks, right? Apart from the depth of flavor that comes from cooking a bony piece of meat, what vegetables and flavored liquids do you like?

    I can imagine getting a head start on the meaty flavors by making a rich stock with cuts with lots of bone, skin, and connective tissue. Well carmelized vegetables will also add flavor to the stock.

    paulj

    1 Reply
    1. re: paulj

      We've always done a classic "alla Milanese", with tomato, white wine, onion, carrots, celery, etc. I have some great veal stock in the freezer.

    2. I very much like the recipe in the Dean and Deluca cookbook (surprisingly). I make it whenever I see some really nice veal shank and always get rave reviews.

      1. Osso Buco
        Serves: 6

        Ingredients:

        • ¼ cup olive oil
        • 1 cup flour
        • 2 Tablespoons Creole Seasoning
        • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
        • 1 Tablespoon grated lemon peel
        • 4 1½ -inch-thick slices of veal hind shank
        • 2 Tablespoons (¼ stick) butter
        • 1 cup onion chopped fine
        • ½ cup carrot chopped fine
        • ½ cup celery chopped fine
        • 1 teaspoons garlic chopped fine
        • 1 cup dry white wine
        • 1½ cups canned Italian plum tomatoes, chopped with juice
        • 2 bay leaves
        • ¼ cup parsley, chopped
        • 4 anchovy fillets
        • 2 cups canned beef broth
        • 2 cups canned chicken broth

        Method:

        1. Preheat oven to 350°.
        2. In a black cast iron pot heat the olive oil over medium high heat
        3. Mix the flour, Creole Seasoning, lemon peel and thyme in a small bowl
        4. Coat the veal shanks in the flour mixture, shaking off the excess.
        5. Add veal to the hot oil and sauté until brown on all sides, about 8 minutes.
        6. When browned, transfer veal to a platter.
        7. Tip the skillet and spoon off all but a little bit of the oil.
        8. In the same pot, melt the butter and sauté the onion, carrot, celery and chopped garlic over medium heat. Cook for about 3 minutes.
        9. Add the wine and reduce it by simmering it over medium heat while scraping loose with a wooden spoon the browning residues stuck to the bottom and sides.
        10. Add the chopped tomatoes with their juice, the bay leaves, parsley and anchovy fillets.
        11. Add both stocks to the pot and bring it to a simmer.
        12. Return veal to pot. The broth should have come two-thirds of the way up to the top of the shanks. If it does not, add more.
        13. Cover the pot tightly, and place it in the lower third of the preheated oven.
        14. Cook for about 2 hours or until the meat feels very tender when prodded with a fork and a dense, creamy sauce has formed.
        15. Turn and baste the shanks every 20 minutes.
        16. If, while the osso buco is cooking, the liquid in the pot becomes insufficient, add 2 tablespoons of water at a time, as needed.
        17. When the osso buco is done, transfer it to a warm platter and pour the sauce from the pot over them, and serve at once.

        1. Osso Buco (Pressure Cooker)
          Serves: 4

          Ingredients:

          • ¼ cup olive oil
          • 1 cup flour
          • 2 Tablespoons Creole Seasoning
          • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
          • 1 Tablespoon grated lemon peel
          • 4 1½ -inch-thick slices of veal hind shank
          • 2 Tablespoons (¼ stick) butter
          • 1 cup onion chopped fine
          • ½ cup carrot chopped fine
          • ½ cup celery chopped fine
          • 1 teaspoons garlic chopped fine
          • 1 cup dry white wine
          • 1½ cups canned Italian plum tomatoes, chopped with juice
          • 2 bay leaves
          • ¼ cup parsley, chopped
          • 4 anchovy fillets
          • 2 cups canned beef broth
          • 2 cups canned chicken broth
          Method:

          1. In a black cast iron skillet heat the olive oil over medium high heat
          2. Mix the flour, Creole Seasoning, lemon peel and thyme in a small bowl
          3. Coat the veal shanks in the flour mixture, shaking off the excess.
          4. Add veal to the hot oil and sauté until brown on all sides, about 8 minutes.
          5. When browned, transfer veal to a platter.
          6. Tip the skillet and spoon off all but a little bit of the oil.
          7. In the same pot, melt the butter and sauté the onion, carrot, celery and chopped garlic over medium heat. Cook for about 3 minutes.
          8. Add the wine and reduce it by simmering it over medium heat while scraping loose with a wooden spoon the browning residues stuck to the bottom and sides.
          9. Place veal, liquid and sautéed vegetables in the pressure cooker.
          10. Add both stocks to the pot.
          11. Add the bay leaves, parsley and anchovy fillets.
          12. Cover, seal, then cook under pressure for 20 minutes.
          13. After 20 minutes, remove the cover and add the chopped tomatoes with their juice then cover and cook under pressure for another 5 minutes.
          14. When the osso buco is done, transfer it to a warm platter and pour the sauce from the pot over them, and serve at once.

          1. There was a recent thread about a rustic variation on this, peposo notturno
            http://www.chowhound.com/topics/453908
            This uses beef shanks instead of veal. The main liquid is Chianti. The main seasoning, garlic and tons of blackpepper (peposo). The notturno comes from over night cooking in tile baking ovens. More 'civilized' versions cut back on the pepper, and use more vegetables.

            Should an Osso Bucco develop a deep color - from tomotoes and the browing of the meat and stock, or should it stay light. I'm wondering whether the use of white wine, as opposed to a red, matters.

            I suspect that this, as with other braises, improves in flavor if allowed to sit over night. The final quality of the dish may be depend a lot on how you finish the sauce - whether you strain out the solids, or puree them, and how you adjust the quantity (reduce or dilute), and adjust the seasoning.

            Isn't this dish supposed to be finished with gremolata (a parsley, zest, garlic garnish).

            paulj

            1 Reply
            1. re: paulj

              Yes, it is finished with gremolata, which gives a lovely bright note to the rich full taste of the dish.