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Mincemeat Cake- Need help ASAP!

macca Dec 18, 2007 06:36 AM

Just got a call from my mother- each years she makes mincemeat cake at Christmas. She uses the small, condensed boxes of mincemeat, and the recipe calls for cooking the mincemeat in water, then adding flour, sugar, etc. The recipe was written on a scrap of paper, and is from my aunts mother, so it is REALLY old. Well- she can't find the recipe. I have searched, but cannot find anything. Does anyone have this recipe? TIA

  1. f
    fionnk Dec 18, 2007 07:09 AM

    Check out the site for Eagle brand nonsuch Mincemeat (condensed)- they have a few cake recipes that use mincemeat, such as one for fruitcake.

    http://www.eaglenonesuch.com/detail.a...

    4 Replies
    1. re: fionnk
      macca Dec 18, 2007 09:05 AM

      Thanks for the link- but that is not the recpe. This is not a fruit cake, there are no fruits or nuts in the cake. and I know the mincement is cooked in water before adding the baking ingredients, And there is no bakiing powder- just baking soda. It sounds odd, but it is really good- really moist and not too sweet.

      1. re: macca
        f
        fionnk Dec 18, 2007 09:37 AM

        What about this recipe for mince meat pound cake? It doesn't have additional fruits and nuts, or baking powder. Though it calls for regular mincemeat, I would suggest rehydrating the condensed mincemeat with a 1 cup of tea, or orange juice, and a 1/2 C of sherry, whiskey, or brandy, instead of the 1 1/2 Cups of water from the package directions, and warm it on the stove, and then using it to replace the mincemeat called for in the recipe. Does it seem close to your old recipe?
        http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/155/MincemeatPoundCake71178.shtml

        Also here is a link to a mincemeat coffee style cake recipe, from Sharon's food blog, which sounds good, but is probably not the recipe you are looking for:

        http://sfoodblog.blogspot.com/2007/11...

        Sorry I can't be of more help. Good luck finding the recipe.
        Regards,
        Fionn.

        1. re: fionnk
          macca Dec 18, 2007 10:07 AM

          the recipe from Sharons blog looks pretty close. Will have to stop by my moms and see if I can find it. If I do, the recipe is going on the cpm0uter for next year!! Like a lot of people, most of her recipes are inside a cookbook on a scrap of paper!! Thanks for the help.

        2. re: macca
          paulj Dec 18, 2007 10:16 AM

          A lot of date bread recipes call for soaking chopped dates. I can imagine using the cooked mincemeat in the same way. For that matter, it could probably be substituted for pumpkin puree in other quick bread recipes.

          There is probably enough acidity in the mincemeat mix (from the fruit) to work with baking soda, though it wouldn't harm anything to add a teaspoon of baking powder.

          A fruit based quick bread baked in an 8x8 pan instead of a loaf is not that different from a spice or carrot cake - just not quite as sweet.

          paulj

      2. v
        violabratsche Dec 18, 2007 07:45 AM

        I'd really appreciate it if someone would explain what this dried mincemeat is. I've never seen it. We can get it in jars here, ready to use. I've made it from scratch myself and, for the life of me, I cannot figure out how it could be dried.

        AnnieG

        2 Replies
        1. re: violabratsche
          macca Dec 18, 2007 09:16 AM

          Wish I could tell you!! It is something we always had at Christmas. It somes in a small box- like a kids juice box size . It is called None Such condensed mincemeat. Will have to take a look at the box next time I am in the grocery store and see what it is!!

          1. re: macca
            paulj Dec 18, 2007 09:48 AM

            I don't have a box on hand, but packaged mincemeat like this is mostly fruit - things like apples and raisins. So they could either make it from dried fruit, or use fresh fruit and dry it after mixing.

            Even if they used suet and meat (the more traditional version), it could still be dried. Think for example of the North American pemmican - dried deer, bear grease, and dried berries.
            paulj

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