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Is a Halloween pumpkin edible?

d
doc_k55 Dec 13, 2007 03:57 PM

I hope this isn't a dumb question. We never carved it and it's been outside. So first, is it still good? (no brown spots, still hard and orange). Second, is it edible?

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  1. JoanN Dec 13, 2007 05:41 PM

    It's probably edible, but it might not be very good. I've never cooked one, but one of the reasons that cheese pumpkins and sugar pumpkins are recommended for cooking or for making pumkin pies is that they're much less stringy than Halloween pumpkins. But try it. What have you got to lose?

    1. j
      jsaimd Dec 13, 2007 05:43 PM

      If it is still hard it is OK - you will be able to tell if it is bad.

      Can you cook it? Technically yes, but is it a good eating pumpkin, probably not. They tend to be very watery and don't have thick flesh. My son's jack o' lantern (carved Halloween night), had a very thick flesh, so I decided to give it a shot. I chunked it the next morning, roasted it, and it let out a lot of water, then took out the pulp, pureed in batches and strained like crazy. The result was fine, not great. We ate it - hey - it was cheap veggies with good vitamins, but it won't be great eating. It needed a lot of seasoning and was missing that yummy pumpkin flavor. I was expecting mediocrity, so it wasn't a dissapointment. Now the sugar pie and baby bear pumpkins we get from our CSA - those are good!

      1. r
        RGC1982 Dec 13, 2007 06:27 PM

        I used to make pumpkin pies out of these very pumpkins years ago. They are a little harder to work with because they are stringier and need a bit more sugar, but are just as edible as long as you have a solid fruit that has not started to rot. You should remove as much of the seeds and stringy inside (roast the seeds!) and bake the pumpkin in large chunks with the skin on it until tender. It should be fine to use at that point.

        1. d
          doc_k55 Dec 13, 2007 06:48 PM

          thanks to all for the pointers. I might end up just chucking it!

          1. m
            mpbmar12 Nov 5, 2013 07:22 PM

            Yes it is. Cut and clean inside, remove skin and cut in cubes if you want to puree it, and cook in low heat without water. I just did it today, i made a pumpkin soup. loafs of pumpkin bread and some just to enjoy with cheese. came out very delicious!

            1. Chowbird Nov 6, 2013 07:57 AM

              Technically . . . I used one (bought for the purpose, not an ex-Jack o'Lantern!) to make pumpkin soup once.

              IMHO, the best thing you can do is take out the seeds and roast 'em! Seeds are the best part of the big ones!

              1. greygarious Nov 6, 2013 11:56 AM

                I know this is a revived thread but will mention here that soaking pumpkin or squash viscera in cold water for several hours (overnight if in a cold area or fridge) makes separating out the seeds a lot easier. You don't have to be ULTRA-thorough in getting every trace of flesh off the seeds before roasting them. The flesh will pretty much crumble away after roasting and cooling.

                The squirrels and other wildlife will eat the skin (cooked or raw) and guts of pumpkin and squash.

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