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Magnalite Pots & Pans???

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I have several MPS Magnalite Professional Stainless Steel pots and pans. They are NOT the ones that I've seen mentioned on other postings. These are a shiny stainless steel throughout with a hollow round steel handle. The inside does NOT have a non-stick surface. On my 2QT pot is says Item No. 3602. They are very heavy and it seems like there is an insulated copper lip on the bottom of the pan.

I've had these since I got married 13 years ago and don't always use them because they aren't non-stick and I have issues cooking with them. Does anyone know anything about this version of cookware? Does it cook differently than the other grayish black Magnalite pieces? I'm thinking of replacing them but I'm not sure. They have held up very well. Maybe I'm just not using them correctly. Any information or advise would be greatly appreciated.

 
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  1. I looked up Magnalite the other day and found advertising only for unanodized, aluminum pans these days.

    What are your problems using them? Someone here will probably have useful suggestions.

    2 Replies
    1. re: mpalmer6c

      I guess I don't have REAL problems with them I just don't know if I'd prefer a non-stick surface. I almost always end up using my cheap non-stick skillet to saute anything because the food doesn't stick and then cleanup is so much easier. With a little elbow grease these Magnalite pans shine like they were brand new, I'm just lazy sometimes.

      I've been thinking about asking my husband to purchase me a new set of pots & pans but I couldn't do that unless I could find a good home for these. I KNOW they are good pans, and they are in great condition, but I wouldn't know what to sell them for since I really don't know what they are! I just thought someone might be able to give me some insight.

      1. re: afugere

        I think you've got some product that was not well promoted and not too many people know about. I'd hang on to it and start preheating the pans when you want to use them. I think you just need to better understand what you're cooking with. Read up on how to cook with All Clad or similar brands and apply the same rules to your pans.

        NS is nice for things like eggs and fish but those pans should be performing well for you. Sauce pans might stick a little but make sure you keep the heat low when you're warming up or simmering sauces.

        If you want to replace some of them, start looking at the individual pieces and how you cook with them. Note what works, what doesn't work and figure out if you are using the right technique for the pan. If you decide to replace the pan, start one piece at a time. Don't just go out and buy new....take baby steps!

    2. http://www.fantes.com/magnalite.htm

      Read up on it here. The true Magnalite was an alloy of aluminum and magnesium hence the name. It been bought out and there is litigation, if I wanted the real thing I'd start looking at Amazon and E-Bay

      1 Reply
      1. re: Candy

        I took a look at the website you provided but the "Classic Magnalite" doesn't look like my pots & pans. If you take a look at the picture I provided it doesn't have ANY black handle grips or knobs to the lids. Ebay doesn't seem to have my pots either. I'm just not sure what I have!

      2. I have a set of these pots and pans, with lids. My neice is getting married and I wanted to get her the same. Then I ran across you! If you want to sell, I am interested. When I got these about 1998, I tossed out ALL my other pots and pans, except one good nonstick fry pan. The numbers on mine are 3601,3603, 3610 and 3620. Came with three lids. The outsides are what they called a "Mirror" finish. I am quite sure I could locate the original literature, if needed. I'd be so happy to be able to get my niece the exact same pans that I have. What condition are yours in? How many do you have? I do remember because of the Mirror finish, they advised not using cleanser or anything that would scratch the mirror finish, therefore, no dishwasher.

        2 Replies
        1. re: moongem

          Isn't this the same roaster?

          http://www.chefscatalog.com/product/2...

          1. re: moongem

            http://www.amazon.com/CHEFS-DESIGN-Tr...

          2. Non-stick... don't worry about that! The beauty of the pans is developing a rich fond when roasting or sauteeing... pan searing. Then making a lovely pan-sauce out of the caramelized bits at the bottom of the pan!

            1. Your heat is probably too high up as it is, slowly heat your pan BEFORE adding any fats or oils to the pan itself. Keep your heat more at about a med... maybe a bit higher, but resist the urge to crank the heat on your stove-top!

            2. If searing meats, heat the pan up... salt and pepper (liberally) the meats about 10-15min before cooking and leave them out on a plate (tempering your proteins; will do wonders for you) and then oil the proteins directly instead of the pan. Truss or tie any cuts... it helps fo' sho'! Or, at least "bunch" up the steak/ cut into itself.

            3. When laying down the proteins on the hot pan... leave them where they lay! You want the meats to develop that lovely browning crust that is flavor. It isn't ready to move unless it is ready to, the meat will suddenly -not stick- to the surface anymore.

            Really delicate fish (unless pan frying), eggs... yeah, I wouldn't use these pans. Meats like chicken, steaks, pork, duck... etc... these pans are great for that. With the aforementioned steps, I'm willing to be that you will find more uses for your pans and the same applies to all "bare surface" pans like cast iron, All Clad, Tinned Coppers, etc.

            Best of luck to you!

            1. Was looking for info on my MagPro cookware and found this blog. I, too, have been wondering why I can't find any more of it. I've had mine for about 20 years, and it is phenomenal. The Calphalon (which I began noticing as MagPro was disappearing) is NOWHERE as good as MagPro. I have gobs of MagPro because Macy's was having a sale (I realize, in retrospect, to get rid of all this product), and every piece was $35. I had been drooling over this cookware and knew it was $125 to $600 a piece so I snatched up everything they had: large roaster, huge skillet with a grasp handle opposite the regular handle, 13" skillet, 9" skillet, appx. 11" x 15" casserole pan, 3 piece nesting pan set (1Q, 2Q, 3.5Q), and on and on, all with lids, and also handle covers (the handles on my cookware are solid metal, with an oval opening at the end for hanging.

              I was gratified to see so much info on the blog and that others are looking for it as well. Also good to know is that it is being "reintroduced" and that the quality may not be (probably isn't) as good. This stuff is heavy, and it's almost impossible to burn anything in it. I accidentally burned rice in one of the pans, but it scraped right out -- AND -- the top of the rice was fine and totally edible! It isn't non-stick, but whatever metal (hard anodized) they're using makes it pretty easy to get stuff out.

              So, if anyone out there has any more info, and knows where the hard anodized cookware could be purchased (excluding ebay), that would be good to know. Thanks,
              webcooker

              1. ok I'm new at this so hopefully I am doing this correctly. I have a set of these pots, they were my grandmothers and are at least 30yrs old. As I read about them I am not sure if I should be concerned about using them for cooking. I have used the dutch oven for years and have recently found a number of uses for the roaster. Is there any concern that I should know about...I dont even cook with teflon coated pans as I find that about as unsafe as you can think of(only cast iron for frying in this household).

                1. As I posted elsewhere, I'd avoid these stainless steel 'Magnalite' pots.
                  The bottom on my 5 qt dutch oven has become delaminated and makes a strange noise when heated.
                  The recently published contact website does Not respond to emails.
                  So much for a 'lifetime' warranty.

                  1. From an Original Magnalite Care and Use Instructions Booklet...

                    Magnalite [cookware] is made from aluminum and a special magnesium alloy which is an excellent heat conductor and reacts well to change in temperature, it is "cast as thick as two silver dollars" and "cooks food from all sides-it's like having an oven on top of your range (heat radiates from every part of Magnalite not from the bottom only.)" Can be taken from refrigerator to the oven.

                    History...

                    1934 - The Wagner Manufacturing Company of Sidney, Ohio developed and introduced the first blended aluminum and magnesium cast cookware line as WagnerWare Magnalite. (Magnalite Classic)

                    1979 - The Wagner Manufacturing Division of General Housewares Corp, developed and introduced the first hard anodized cast cookware line as GHC Magnalite Professional. (Magnalite Professional)

                    Today...

                    Magnalite by Wagner was hand poured and cast in Sidney, Ohio. It is considered to be some of the finest American made cookware ever produced. Original WagnerWare and GHC Magnalite cookware are in high demand by collectors and daily users, alike.

                    http://www.wagnerware.com/
                    http://www.wag-society.org/

                    1 Reply
                    1. re: jpinsatx

                      This is good stuff. While the conductivity of magnesium (55) is much lower than plain aluminum (151), magnesium's specific heat (1.05) is better than aluminum's already excellent (.91). In fact, the specific heat of magnesium is better than any metal used in cookware.

                      The thickness of "two silver dollars" is 4.8 mm

                      Therefore: good conductivity, holds heat well, extremely even heat.