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Simple homemade applesauce recipe?

Anyone have one? Everything I find online has a bunch of other stuff in it (cranberries, strawberries, etc.)

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  1. Use apples.

    You can use them skins on....you can peel, core and quarter them, cook with a small amount of water or apple juice or cider. You can use a little lemon juice, or cider vinegar. You can add sugar or not. You can add honey or maple syrup or any other natural syrup, or not. You can make enough for your evening pork chops, using one apple, in the microwave, or you can take a bushel of apples, and have a day's project on your hands. You can process applesauce, as my mother did, or freeze it, making sure to stir it up well before serving. You can use any variety of apple that you can find.

    WHAT recipe???

    AnnieG

    1. I make it all the time for my daughter and the PP is correct. You really don't need a recipe. I peel the apples (I like a mix of a couple types) and quarter them. Then I steam them for about 15-20 min. Then I throw them in my food precessor with a touch cinnamon. I will never buy applesauce again!

      4 Replies
      1. re: SweetPea914

        Yes, but the PP is unfortunately TOO vague for me. "Cook" the apples. By what method? For how long? Do I bake them? Boil them? Put them in the microwave? I honestly have no idea. What is "a small amount" of water. How much water per apple? Do you process it after or before? I mean, how small do you cut up the apples? This is really too vague for me.

        1. re: rockandroller1

          I like a chunky-not so sweet applesauce. I will peel,core and slice about 3lbs of apples (I love stayman). Will put about 1/2 C water in large sauce pan. Cut and drop into pan with heat about med. I only add about 1/4 Cup sugar and about 2 teaspoons of cinnamon. I will stew about 1/2 hr till some can be mashed with potato masher. (can taste and adjust to your liking) Then I freeze in containers to have some for later. Hope this helps..

          1. re: rockandroller1

            It's interesting that most posters seem to suggest boiling the apples. Maybe because I make it for my daughter's baby food, I much prefer steaming since hopefully that will retain the most nutrients. Also as other people have said, applesauce freezes very well. I make big batches about once/month and defrost as needed.

        2. Everyone here's right that you don't need a recipe, but here's what I do (and I love it!)

          Bag of red apples
          2 green apples
          2 green bartlett pears
          Generous dash cinnamon
          Small dash each: Nutmeg, Allspice, Cloves

          Chop the fruit (leave the skin on, it "dissolves"). Put it in a big pan, and add some water (to the point where you can just see it--maybe 1/3 pan?). Bring to boil, then turn down to low and simmer several hours. Once the apples begin to break down, add the spices. Stir occassionally to help mush up the apples and to prevent burning on the bottom. Add glugs water when necessary--even if you add too much, it'll cook out. Eat!

          My 2 big tips: 1) se a variety of apples for the best flavor. You won't even want to add sugar! (The slow cooking also helps with that). 2) The pears add a nice complexity, but it still tastes like "pure" applesauce.

          1. Recently I made this (for the first time)...SO EASY!!

            I peeled and cube 3 large golden delicious apples, put in a sauscepan with about 1/4 cup sugar, 1 cinnamon stick and simmered till they were mushy. Then cooled in the fridge. Delicious!

            1 Reply
            1. re: Obessed

              For just a little bit of a change, I'll skip the cinnamon and throw in some of those little red hot (cinnamon) candies. The applesauce turns a pleasant pink and is a slightly spicer than just using cinnamon.

            2. Mine couldn't be easier (so long as you have a food mill). Rinse a lot of apples (any variety; mixing varieties words great too). Don't peel or core. Cut apples into chunks of any size. Toss in a large pot. Add water to cover the bottom of the pot, no more than 1/4." Cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, until everything's mushy. Put through a food mill. Taste while still warm, and add sugar 1/4 cup at a time, until you like the taste. Add cinnamon or other spices if you like. Applesauce freezes great, so make big bathes and freeze what you're not going to eat right away.

              1 Reply
              1. re: vicarious

                vicarious, does a food mill process the pulp and leave behind the skin and core? Leave the skin on? Neat, I never knew that before.

                I use a blender.

                Peel apples, core them, cut in large chunks, put in a medium pot with some orange juice (half way up the pot), put the lid on and walk away. Well, not really, the gas has to be very low and you have to replace the liquid if it evaporates. Depending on the apples, add some brown sugar, or not. When smooshy, take off the heat.

                When cooled, puree in a blender. That's it.

              2. I like this very simple one from epicurious.com that is nothing more than slicing some apples, tossing with some water, microwaving it and then adding a bit of sugar. To me, it's exactly the right amount of sweet (as in not very).

                http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

                1. r n' r, an apple pear combo is delicious too. no need for water (pear simmers down enough juice) no need for sugar. blend up chunky or smooth and keep for a few days in refrig. if you had a spice to the fruit, do so while it's still warm-preblend.
                  occasionally I add a tsp of vanilla extract and a pinch of seasalt.

                  1. OK, this is seriously the most basic recipe imaginable:
                    1/2 in. water in a large, heavy pot
                    5 lbs apples, washed and quartered
                    boil about 30 min., stirring occasionally, and then put through a food mill (I have an Oxo food mill and it is great)
                    you probably won't even need to add sugar

                    1 Reply
                    1. re: Procrastibaker

                      Bravo!
                      I would have thought the basics of it would have been obvious. Thanks for the simple method for our thread originator.

                      AnnieG