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Baker's sugar?

d
DKS1 Nov 20, 2007 11:19 AM

Quick question - what is this?!

Sorry for my naiveté, but I'm making a scone recipe tonight or tomorrow (thanks, Chef Chicklet!) and it calls for 2 T of Baker's Sugar... I'm not familiar with this term, so can I use regular granulated or powdered sugar instead if Baker's Sugar isn't already one of these?

TIA!

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  1. k
    Kelli2006 Nov 20, 2007 11:25 AM

    Bakers sugar is a finger sugar than granulated sugar but not as fine as powdered sugar.

    You can make a very close approximation in the food processor with 8-10 2-3 second pulses. If you don't have a F-P, you can substitute regular white granulated sugar. I would add about 1 Tsp to make up for the difference in granule size.

    1. JoanN Nov 20, 2007 11:26 AM

      Baker's sugar has finer granules than regular sugar. You can make your own by putting regular sugar in a blender or food processor and processing for about half a minute.

      1 Reply
      1. re: JoanN
        chef chicklet Nov 20, 2007 11:34 AM

        kelli and joanN- thanks for that tip, I would not of tried that!

      2. d
        DKS1 Nov 20, 2007 11:28 AM

        Thank you both VERY much for this great info. Since I'm only using a couple of tablespoons, I'm not sure I would get a good result if I use a blender/food processor. Do you think the recipe would be ruined if just used regular granulated?

        Or, alternatively, I could just process much more than I need and then keep the rest on hand for future batches. Just thinking out loud here... Thanks for the feedback!

        1 Reply
        1. re: DKS1
          k
          Kelli2006 Nov 20, 2007 11:33 AM

          Bakers sugar is nice to use for coffee or tea, as it dissolves very readily.

          The recipe won't be ruined if you use standard table sugar, as bakers sugar is used because it incorporates(creams) faster and easier.

        2. Candy Nov 20, 2007 12:13 PM

          You won't find it labeled Baker's Sugar in the grocery. It will usually be in a small box and labeled Superfine from Domino. If you are fortunate enough to be able to get C&H I think they do label it Baker's Sugar but I don't find it often.

          2 Replies
          1. re: Candy
            Ruth Lafler Nov 20, 2007 12:23 PM

            Yup -- C&H calls it Baker's Sugar. It comes in a carton the size of a half-gallon milk carton, which I guess is a couple of pounds.

            1. re: Ruth Lafler
              chef chicklet Nov 20, 2007 02:34 PM

              Yes and I am spoiled after using it for baking, it works very well.

          2. v
            vintage gypsy May 22, 2008 08:21 PM

            Boy am I bummed out after reading all these posts that suggest this sugar is just the same as traditional granulated. I purchased C&H Baker's Sugar just because I was intrigued. I have made three different batches of cookies (different days/different recipes) and they all liquefied in the oven. The cookie sheet was river of buttery batter. All three were time-tested and it's only thing that was different each time. I even tried hard not to over cream the sugar and butter. The box says it works the same...has anyone had this experience?

            2 Replies
            1. re: vintage gypsy
              b
              bqmother Nov 22, 2008 12:01 PM

              I'm not sure what's wrong, but is it possible that, because the baker's sugar is finer grained, a cup of baker's sugar is actually more than a cup of regular sugar? I have made my own fine sugar by putting regular sugar in a blender and running on high for a minute or so. When I start with a cupful, what I get out of the blender is a little less than a cupful.

              1. re: vintage gypsy
                g
                greenlady9 Dec 19, 2008 10:26 PM

                I had a bad problem with the C&H Baker's sugar today making krumkake. I've been making it for decades and I think this is the first time I grabbed the Baker's sugar instead. By the end of each batch of batter, the cookies were coming off the krumkake iron and shriveling up! Bizarre and unacceptable as gifts. Since I could see that something was breaking down, I put the batter in the fridge between pours (I use 2 irons) to prolong the integrity of the batter. It worked but I think I'll switch to regular for this. It makes me wonder when this superfine would be more appropriate--probably for things like whipping cream.

              2. a
                adamshoe Nov 22, 2008 03:39 PM

                Used it once or twice. IMHO, an unnecessary product. Regular ol' granulated CANE (not BEET!!!) works pretty darned great for baking. Been using it for 30+ yrs. w/ nary a problem. The heat of baking dissolves pretty much any sugar. Superfine sugar (or Baker's) works well for dissolving in COLD liquids, like iced tea or coffee, which is why bartenders are fans of the stuff....Adam

                2 Replies
                1. re: adamshoe
                  k
                  Kelli2006 Nov 22, 2008 03:49 PM

                  Cold drinks are best sweetened with a simple syrup of 1 cup of both sugar and water that has been brought to a boil for 2 minutes and then cooled. This can be flavored with extracts or juice after cooling.
                  I store it in a squeeze bottle in the refrigerator after it has cooled.

                  1. re: Kelli2006
                    geminigirl Nov 22, 2008 04:12 PM

                    how long can one store syrup in the fridge? I'm thinking pretty much forever, only downside that it might take on fridge flavors? I made an amazing mint syrup this summer and used it all summer in my mojitos, what a difference it makes!

                2. toodie jane Dec 20, 2008 09:01 AM

                  The difference is best explained by the food sceintists among us, but my Austrian baking instructor always used it and I believe the extra-fine texture works better when creamed with the butter in cake batters. (insert science here). We also used it in butter cookie recipes with good success.

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