HOME > Chowhound > Mexico >

Discussion

Tamales in Puerto Vallarta? Or small out of the way eateries that will blow me away?

  • 4

We are going to PV over Thanksgiving. I'm having a heck of a time finding the name of a small Tamale shop in PV.

I had seen a Rick Bayless "Mexico One Plate at a Time" episode (called Go Global, Eat Local) where he visits a little tamale shop in the old town of PV. The tamales look amazing.

Anyone out there - do you happen to know the name of this place?

Also, I'm from the SF bay area and I have some really/good authentic mexican food out here. I want to know if any of you know of any place in PV that will blow me away - I don't care about the view, waitstaff, the decor.... I am looking for real food that is local and amazing.

Let me know what you think.

John

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
Posting Guidelines | FAQs | Feedback
Cancel
  1. Maria Candelaria. I had a card but can't find it--worth a stop. El Arrayan for great traditional food, many dishes from owner's family recipes. Not open for lunch. Maria Candelaria is open midday.

    1. I got a dozen tamales there last year and they were only OK. I did go here twice http://www.joejacks-fishshack.com/ . T
      The fish tacos and fish and chips were made from really good snapper. The shrimp aguachile and the shrimp by the pound were fresh off the boat. The cocktails were made with freshly muddled fruit. It's definitely worth a try. I liked El Arrayan but thought it was a bit expensive. The duck carnitas were a bit dry.

      2 Replies
      1. re: deesher

        the red cabbage is small and out of the way(and a bit hard to find) but well worth looking up.

        1. re: TBird

          from frommers, about the only info i could find:

          Red Cabbage Café (El Repollo Rojo)

          Cuisine Mexican

          Hours Daily 5-10:30pm

          Address Calle Rivera del Río 204A

          Location Across from Río Cuale, South of the Rmo Cuale to Olas Altas

          Phone 322/223-0411

          Prices Main courses $5-$20

          Credit Cards Not accepted




          Frommer's Review

          The tiny, hard-to-find cafe is worth the effort -- a visit here will reward you with exceptional traditional Mexican cuisine and a whimsical crash course in contemporary culture. The small room is covered wall-to-wall and table-to-table with photographs, paintings, movie posters, and news clippings about the cultural icons of Mexico. Frida Kahlo figures prominently in the decor, and a special menu duplicates dishes she and husband Diego Rivera prepared for guests.

          Specialties from all over Mexico include divine chiles en nogada (poblanos stuffed with ground beef, pine nuts, and raisins, topped with sweet cream sauce and served cold), intricate chicken mole from Puebla, and hearty carne en su jugo (steak in its juice). In addition, the vegetarian menu is probably the most diverse and tasty in town (the owner offers cooking classes for groups of four or more). This is not the place for an intimate conversation, however -- the poor acoustics cause everyone's conversations to blend together, although generally what you're hearing from adjacent tables are raves about the food. Also, this is a nonsmoking restaurant -- the only one I'm aware of in town.