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Cantonese BBQ in Flushing comparable or better than Big Wong

For my Sunday just-to-eat trip to Flushing, I plan to pick up some Cantonese style BBQ on my way back to Boston.

The only roast pork, duck, rib I had in NY is Big Wong. They weren't the best I have but way better than those in Boston.

If you have to get chinese BBQ in Flushing, where would you go?

I really really appreicate any suggestions.

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  1. You don't have to go all the way to Flushing for good BBQ. Wing Wong has everything Big Wong has but better quality and cheaper prices. Big Wong is saturated w/ tourists while Wing Wong has a lot of locals. They're located on Mott St. north of Canal St. Their ribs never disappoint! I also like their noodle soups and congee.

    If you're willing to make the trek to Flushing you might want to consider taking the 7 train and getting off Woodside for the BEST AUTHENTIC Thai food. The restaurant is called Sriprapai (Shree-pa-pie). It's better than the Thailand Restaurant on Baxter St. You've got to get the catfish salad.

    2 Replies
    1. re: liv2eat2008

      I always stick to Big Wong because I am afraid I will commit suicide if I try a new place that is not as good as Big Wong. When I ordered I alway played dumb and told them that I drove four hours back and forth to patronize their restaurant so they better gave me better part of the Char Siu or duck. It worked out so far.

      If you said Wing Wong better, I would love to try it. The only problem is we will drive to Flushing afterwards and I plan to buy a lot to satisfy myself with those BBQ food for a few days. As Iwong said, they will not be as good. But life is not perfect, I will be happy enough.

      I learned from a Chinese newspaper that the chef for Siu Sam Yuen at 5 Catherine St. is from HK and makes the roast duck the same way he did it back then. I don't see any posts mention this place but I am willing to buy half of a duck to try it out.

      1. re: sheila

        I wrote a post on the place at 5 Catherine. http://www.chowhound.com/topics/446723 I like it a lot and it's interesting to learn the chef is from Hong Kong. The place had a HK feel to it, as I wrote in my post.

    2. A month ago, we just happened to post information about Flushing BBQ stores that you may find of interest: http://www.chowhound.com/topics/37767... .

      We had made several recommendations at the end of our posting for good Chinese BBQ in Flushing, but one has to be alert, since as stated in the posting, the Chinese BBQ places will sell “old and unpalatable BBQ items to you,” regardless of whether you are Asian or non-Asian.

      There is another posting in this same thread on Chinese BBQ stores that discusses aspects of Chinese BBQ stores that you may also want to read (http://www.chowhound.com/topics/37767...

      )

      In a quick perusal of your Chowhound posts, it would appear that you might be Asian and well versed in buying Chinese BBQ items, hence all of our advice and comments will be superfluous, but just in case you are not Asian and also for the benefit of readers who are not familiar with Chinese BBQ items, we will continue with additional information below.

      The best tactic is to go to all your preferred BBQ places and look at the hanging items the best you can at each of the stores to see which has the freshest looking BBQ items, but as stated in our earlier posts on this topic, BBQ items that look fresh are no guarantee that you will obtain fresh and good items, as the stores all have their tricks of the trade.

      The only sure fire method of getting good BBQ is to see the store bring up a fresh batch of just cooked BBQ items. Just out of the oven “Char Siu” can usually be expected to be excellent, with the pork juicy, tender, and full of flavor, but eat it quickly when you get back to Boston, as the “Char Siu” begins to lose flavor and the pork begins to harden very quickly, as you are losing 4 hours already in driving back to Boston. Once the BBQ sits around too long, eating the BBQ is now just for nutrition and not for pleasure any longer. This same caveat is applicable to most of the BBQ items.

      Chinese usually buy the takeout BBQ items for that night’s dinner and try to eat the BBQ items within four hours of buying them. For your long trip back, if you are lucky enough to buy fresh and still hot BBQ items, you may also want to open the lid of the container holding your BBQ items, otherwise the closed container will steam your BBQ items and they will not be crisp any longer when you arrive back in Boston, especially for roasted pig, roasted duck, and other BBQ items that have crisp textures. However, opening the lids will permeate your car with the smells of the BBQ items, and the occupants of the car may not be able to resist “chowing” down on some of the BBQ items while driving back the four hours to Boston, but this is not necessarily a bad thing, as eating the BBQ while it is still hot is the only way to really savor the BBQ items at their peak flavor and texture.

      Hopefully, the passengers will be kind enough to also give some tidbits of the BBQ items to the driver.

      Good luck!

      6 Replies
      1. re: lwong

        Chinese usually buy the takeout BBQ items for that night’s dinner and try to eat the BBQ items within four hours of buying them....For your long trip back, if you are lucky enough to buy fresh and still hot BBQ items, you may also want to open the lid of the container holding your BBQ items, otherwise the closed container will steam your BBQ items and they will not be crisp any longer when you arrive back in Boston, especially for roasted pig, roasted duck, and other BBQ items that have crisp textures.

        You must be kidding or you timed when Chinese people buy and eat BBQ..LMAO

        1. re: Buddha Belly

          You appear to take our Chowhound post too literally. We could have easily said three hours or five hours, but the meaning is the same, Chinese BBQ does not taste good after “sitting around” a length of time.

          Or per chance you did not notice the words “usually” and “try” in our original sentence?

          Peace.

          1. re: lwong

            Don't be silly,

            First, it's rare to get these meats right out of the oven...most are there for a while
            Second, even if you do, I doubt they would "steam" themselves into limpness..that's just not the nature of these BBQ's

            " eat it quickly when you get back to Boston, as the “Char Siu” begins to lose flavor and the pork begins to harden very quickly" Not true, the pork doesn't harden unless it's poorly cooked. Based on your assessment, Chinese places would be throwing out tons of BBQ pork, which they obviosly do not. In fact, most Chinese reastaurants serve BBQ pork at room temp.

            您瞭解嗎?

            1. re: Buddha Belly

              You must be a hard core Chinese BBQ fan too. IMO, If a place makes bad BBQ food, the food will not taste that good even it just comes out from the oven. If a place makes good BBQ, take roast pork as an example, its skin can still maintain the crispyness after half a day.

              1. re: sheila

                We agree with you that if a Chinese BBQ place is not good, even BBQ items coming fresh out of the oven will not be good. When we wrote that the best method for ensuring the purchase of good BBQ items is to see the “store bring up a fresh batch of just cooked BBQ items,” it was not our intention to imply that just getting fresh BBQ items from the oven from any store would be sufficient to ensure good BBQ. It was implicit that one needs to also buy it from a known good store, but it appears that our writing is still too sloppy and we still need improvement in writing clearer English, although we alluded to this with our sentence “The best tactic is to go to all your preferred BBQ places and ...”

                Your estimate that the crisp texture of the skin on Roasted Pig would still retain it’s “crispiness after half a day” is quite close to our estimate of the time to eat the BBQ items. If one estimates that typically one buys the BBQ items 4 hours on average after being cooked, hence eating it within 4 hours of purchase would be a total of 8 hours, which is reasonably close to your estimate of 12 hours. Does this mean our BBQ standards are higher than yours? (LOL)

              2. re: Buddha Belly

                We certainly agree with you that Chinatown BBQ places do not throw “out tons of BBQ pork.” Chinatown BBQ places do end up with stale BBQ pork and other items, but they indeed do not throw out any stale BBQ if they can help it. They try to sell the stale BBQ items to their customers. We know, since we have been the recipient of much stale BBQ items over these many years.

                In your statements that properly cooked BBQ pork will not dry out and harden with time (“Not true, the pork doesn't harden unless it's poorly cooked.”), and that fresh and hot out of the oven roast pig or other BBQ items with crisp textures will not steam in a closed container and lose their crisp textures (“I doubt they would "steam" themselves into limpness..that's just not the nature of these BBQ's”) or even lose their crisp texture with time (our inference from your remarks), we can only say that your experiences are polar opposites of our experiences in eating Chinese BBQ.

                In this situation, it is probably best if we “close down the kitchen and call it a day,” since there is not much point in discussing an issue where our views are directly contrary to one another where each is firm in their views, and also to preclude any escalation to a coarser level of discourse where impolite words might be exchanged. We notice your use of “silly” already.

                If you happen to enjoy day old Chinese BBQ items, this is certainly your prerogative. As we had stated in an earlier Chowhound post, eating is very democratic where every man can vote for the food of their choice, whenever they eat each, and every day.

                Let’s agree to disagree.

                P.S. We do not understand your Chinese question of “Do you understand?

        2. Corner 28 on 40th Rd and Main St. - great honey roasted duck and roast pork.