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Looking for a surefire pumpkin scone recipe

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I've been searching around for a good recipe for mini pumpkin scones to bring to the relatives on Tgiving (I'll be doing the public transportation shuffle so I want to bring something sturdy that will survive the trip) but all the recipes I've found seem to have mixed reviews.

Who has a delish recipe they are willing to share? I'd like something with a strong pumpkin flavor and possibly some pecans or chocolate chips for variety. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated!

- KB

P.S. I just got a new Nordicware mini scone pan that I plan on using. Any words of wisdom for working with that?

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  1. These are delicious:
    Pumpkin Scones
    Ingredients:
    2 cups all-purpose flour
    1/3 cup light or dark brown sugar
    ½ tsp. ground ginger
    ½ tsp. cinnamon
    1 tsp. baking powder
    ¼ tsp. baking soda
    ¼ tsp. salt
    ½ cup cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces
    1/3 cup white chocolate chips (optional)

    ¼ cup pecans, toasted and chopped (optional)
    1/3 cup buttermilk
    ½ cup pumpkin
    1 tsp. vanilla extract

    For the egg wash:
    1 large egg
    1 tablespoon milk or cream

    Directions:
    Preheat the oven to 400° and place a rack in the middle of the oven. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

    In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, brown sugar, spices, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Cut the butter into small pieces and blend into the flour mixture with a pastry blender or two knives. The mixture should look like coarse crumbs. Stir in the chopped white chocolate. In a separate bowl mix together the buttermilk, pumpkin and vanilla, and then add the buttermilk mixture to the flour mixture. Mix just until the dough comes together. Do not overmix the dough.

    Transfer to a lightly floured surface and knead dough gently four or five times and then pat the dough into a circle that is about 7 inches round. Cut the circle into six equal triangles. Place the scones on the baking sheet. Brush the tops of the scones with the egg wash.

    Place the baking sheet inside another baking sheet to prevent the bottoms of the scones from over browning. Bake for about 20 minutes or until golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. Makes 6 scones.

    Directions:
    Preheat the oven to 400° and place a rack in the middle of the oven. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

    In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, brown sugar, spices, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Cut the butter into small pieces and blend into the flour mixture with a pastry blender or two knives. The mixture should look like coarse crumbs. Stir in the chopped white chocolate. In a separate bowl mix together the buttermilk, pumpkin and vanilla, and then add the buttermilk mixture to the flour mixture. Mix just until the dough comes together. Do not overmix the dough.

    Transfer to a lightly floured surface and knead dough gently four or five times and then pat the dough into a circle that is about 7 inches round. Cut the circle into six equal triangles. Place the scones on the baking sheet. Brush the tops of the scones with the egg wash.

    Place the baking sheet inside another baking sheet to prevent the bottoms of the scones from over browning. Bake for about 20 minutes or until golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. Makes 6 scones.

    3 Replies
    1. re: foodie06

      This recipe uses 1/2 cup of puree for 2 cups of flour. The pumpkin 'quick bread' recipe that I've been using, uses 1 cup of puree for 1 1/2 cups of flour (one loaf). A quick bread/muffin recipe can use a higher proportion of puree without adversely affecting texture. However, I suspect that in all of these recipes, the real flavor comes from the 'pumpkin spices' (cinnamon, etc) rather than the pumpkin itself.

      Note that in another other thread, the poster complained about pumpkin/squash soup being flavorless. No one proposed increasing the amount of pumpkin.

      paulj

      1. re: paulj

        Yeah, from what I can gather I have to either stick with the scone texture and a light pumpkin flavor or opt for a muffin/bread with stronger pumpkin tones. Ah well, such is life, right?

        1. re: paulj

          Actually, I didn't use any pumpkin spices in the recipe that chef chicklet gave, and the flavor of the squash was subtle, but definitely there. That's why I liked it so much, just the vanilla and the sweetness of the squash.

      2. KrazyB I make sweet potato scones you can easily switch with pumpkin puree, they are delicious too.

        2 Cups Flour –King Arthur’s is my preferred brand..
        2 tsp baking powder
        1 egg
        1 T vanilla
        ½ tsp sea salt
        ¼ cup Plus 2 T fine baker’s sugar
        ½ cup ice cold butter cut into small cubes and refrigerate until needed
        1/2 cup chopped pecans save some for the top
        ½ cup ice cold puree made with a little whipping cream
        ½ cup of golden raisins
        2 T cinammon

        For the topping
        1 egg beaten
        1 T whipping cream
        Raw sugar
        Remaining pecans to top

        Cut butter into cubes and refrigerate until ready to use

        Sift the flour, salt, baking powder and sugar into a large bowl
        Cut the butter into the flour mixture with pastry blender until resembles coarse meal
        In a smaller bowl whisk the sweet potato cream puree and the egg, and vanilla – add to the dry mixture mixing with a fork, and stir until just combined – do not over mix!
        Then gently add the nuts and raisins.
        Pour the dough mix onto a lightly floured board and pat into a 7 inch 1 to 1 ½ inch high ( I do use a ruler) disk. Cut into in half then quarters and then in eights as evenly as possible.

        Place the scones on a baking sheet with silpat or parchment paper – this ensures even browning on the bottom

        Mix 1 egg with the 1 T of cream and brush the tops with the cream-egg mixture then sprinkle generously with the raw sugar crystals and nuts/and little cinnamon

        Bake at 375 degrees for 17 minutes and no longer!
        This will ensure a moister scone than normally expected.
        I have a gas oven, and I place the rack in the middle of the oven.

        34 Replies
        1. re: chef chicklet

          Thank you so much, chef chicklet and foodie06! I'll let you know which one I end up going with!

          1. re: chef chicklet

            THANK YOU CHEF CHICKLET!!!!!!!! The scones were amazing... so tender. I did use a sweet squash instead of pumpkin puree, (and I added more sugar, I am an addict), but followed all of your instructions to a TEE and was rewarded with the perfect scone. I even timed it so that both babies were down for a nap when I pulled them out of the oven. I just finished three, with a cup of chai, my feet are up, and I am hugely grateful!!

            1. re: alex8alot

              I know how hard it is to follow the directions, I do the same thing, but this is one of those "just trust me" situations. Thanks!

            2. re: chef chicklet

              chef, is there something I am missing?? I don't see sweet potato listed in the ingredients. Also something must be missing from 1/2 cup ice cold puree??

              1. re: millygirl

                Hi mg, the "ice cold puree". I make these awesome sweet potato scones that are just the best. I thought that KrazyB could swap the sweet potato for the pumpkin puree. Actually any puree. Just stick to those instructions. Timing, measuring is really important. Believe me I worked about 8 months getting the perfect scone down. This the sweet potato recipe, which can be easily made into pumpkin without any problems. First make your puree with the pumpkin. If you are using canned added a couple T of cream. I freeze it at this point so I can make them later.

                Sweet Potato Scones with Pecans

                Sweet potato puree - 3 pureed sweet potatoes – not huge with one cup of cream
                Scoop I cup of puree in place of usual ½ cup whipping cream

                2 Cups Flour –King Arthur’s is my preferred brand..
                2 tsp baking powder
                1 egg
                1 T vanilla
                ½ tsp sea salt
                ¼ cup Plus 2 T fine baker’s sugar
                ½ cup ice cold butter cut into small cubes and refrigerate until needed
                1/2 cup chopped pecans save some for the top
                ½ cup ice cold puree made with cream
                ½ cup of golden raisins
                2 T cinammon

                For the topping
                1 egg beaten
                1 T whipping cream
                Raw sugar
                Remaining pecans to top

                Cut butter into cubes and refrigerate until ready to use

                Sift the flour, salt, baking powder and sugar into a large bowl
                Cut the butter into the flour mixture with pastry blender until resembles coarse meal
                In a smaller bowl whisk the sweet potato cream puree and the egg, and vanilla – add to the dry mixture mixing with a fork, and stir until just combined – do not over mix!
                Then gently add the nuts and raisins.
                Pour the dough mix onto a lightly floured board and pat into a 7 inch 1 to 1 ½ inch high disk. Cut into in half then quarters and then in eights as evenly as possible.

                Place the scones on a baking sheet with silpat or parchment paper – this ensures even browning on the bottom

                Mix 1 egg with the 1 T of cream and brush the tops with the cream-egg mixture then sprinkle generously with the raw sugar crystals and nuts/and little cinnamon

                Bake at 375 degrees for 17 minutes and no longer!
                This will ensure a moister scone than normally expected.
                I have a gas oven, and I place the rack in the middle of the oven.

                1. re: chef chicklet

                  These were outstanding! Like PaulJ predicted it didn't work right with the square pan but I made do by using the baking sheet. I subbed mini chocolate chips for the raisins and it was delish!

                  Question though, chef when do you add the 2T of cinnamon? I didn't see it mentioned in the directions so I just mixed it in at the end.

                  1. re: KrazyB

                    I am piggybacking on KrazyB, I thought these were FANTASTIC, I ended up making two batches in a row since I had all the ingredients leftover, enough for two. I had the same problem with the cinnamon, I was concerned that 2 T was too much so I didn't add as much (quite a bit less in fact) and used the cinnamon sugar on top. I thought they were great, nice tender crumb...thanks for working on this and sharing Chefchick (let)!!!

                    1. re: KrazyB

                      Yes at the end is perfect! I'm glad you liked them. I have only made these on a baking sheet cut intothe triangle shape, as I described, never a square baking pan? Not sure I know what that is, I'll look...
                      I can't promise with a different pan size or shape, I know that this way is fool proof for me, and I promise I have made them a zillion times without a problem.
                      Mini chocolate chips sound great to me in this recipe, I've been thinking about making plain choc chip scones, how much did you use?

                    2. re: chef chicklet

                      chef chicklet, I have no idea if I can get a response this late in the game. I would love to try your sweet potato/pumpkin scone recipe but could use some clarification. 1. Your recipe says to use 1/2 c cream puree but earlier you say to use 1 c? 2. When using canned pumpkin, it's 1/2 c pumpkin + 2 T cream? This seems like a lot less than your other purees, so I wasn't sure...Thanks!

                      1. re: carhiking

                        Hi there Carhiking. Sorry to confuse you with my recipe talk.

                        1. 1 cup ice cold puree - (previously made with 1 cup of cream to 3 med sweet potatoes) I confused you by mentioning that I use 1/2 ice cold cup of cream in my usual scone recipe. I should of just left that comment out...sorry!!

                        2. Loosening up the pumpkin puree. About 2 T to 1/2 cup of the canned puree. you might need more,

                        1. re: chef chicklet

                          I made these just now while my daughter was napping. All I have to say is.... thank you!!!!!!!!! First time making scones.. and first time really baking anything since baby was born. Sooo easy to put together, and much less intimidating than I thought. I skipped the nuts though, and used canned pumpkin bc that's all I had.

                          1. re: cheesecake17

                            Excellent! I am so glad that you understood my twisted recipe. I've made these with different ingredients every which way to Sunday and I sometimes get myself confused with my own changes. No need to add nuts, do it your way. You have the basic idea, if you change these to another flavor say banana, use 1/2 cup of puree plus 2 T cream or till you get that loosened consistency. ps, I'd also add maybe some banana flavoring and maybe mini choc chips, etc. you get the idea. ps. bet your house smells good!

                            1. re: chef chicklet

                              house smelled great! husband took a few to work today.. I hope they like them.

                              any ideas to make an apple cinnamon scone? I was thinking applesauce, but it might be too wet.

                              also.. what about using jarred baby food for the puree?

                  2. re: chef chicklet

                    Question for Chef or Alex -- does this recipe make 8 full sized scones or 8 mini scones? I've got a mini scone pan that has room for 16 so I'm trying to figure out if I should double the recipe or just cut the eight pieces in half. Thoughts?

                    1. re: KrazyB

                      How is a scone pan different from a baking sheet? Did it come with sample recipes?

                      1. re: paulj

                        No it didn't come with any sample recipes.

                        It's a cast aluminum pan with little slots for the scones so they have a nice triangle shape. I haven't used it before. Here is the link if you want to see what it looks like:

                        http://www.amazon.com/NordicWare-0333...

                        1. re: KrazyB

                          The Amazon description says the pan is 9.5 x 9.5. The above recipe calls for rolling the dough into a 7" circle. The area of a 7" circle is quite a bit less than the area of 9x9 pan. My guess is that this pan is sized to work with the same scone mix as their 10" round pan. But it is hard to tell what the volume or weight of their mix is.

                          One option is to just pat the dough (as in the above recipe) in to the pan. There should be enough to fill the holes, though the thickness may be less than than the 1 - 1 1/2 " that the recipe calls for. If the resulting scones are too thin, then double the recipe for the next try. For the initial try, don't depend on the time; watch them for doneness.

                          I haven't baked this recipe, but my experience with biscuits (really just unsweetened scones) is that, when baked on a sheet, they expand both in area and height. If constrained by the pan, they will just expand vertically.

                          The other option is to cut pieces that are a bit undersized to fit in the hollows of the pan, and letting them expand to fill the area. But that may be more work than it is worth.

                          The third is to just use the baking sheet. The edges of the baked scones won't be as well defined as with your pan, but that's just a matter of looks, not taste.

                          paulj

                          1. re: paulj

                            Nope. It will work, just roll it to 7 inches, and 1 1 1/2 high. Then if you want to use your slotted pan place them in the slots, but be sure to spray the inside with pam.

                            Paulj why not just try it. If you pat it down thinner you will ruin this recipe, first it will be overworking the dough and the texture, and second they will not be the beautiful scone I promise you if you follow my directions.

                            I have worked on this recipe a long time (at least 8 months), unless you bake it yourself and you said you have not, please don't change my instructions. These do not expand, and you are really adding comments that are not true. These are not biscuits.
                            If anything more like a shortbread.
                            This is where I get frustrated with giving out recipes and that are really meant to be followed. ( my condolences to the Haazan followers)

                            1. re: chef chicklet

                              Wedges cut from your 7" circle won't fit the Nordic Ware openings. They might work with the 10" round one, but the 'mini' is square, with 45 deg equilateral triangular openings.

                              I was trying to figure out a way that the OP could use the Nordic pan and your recipe. My recommendations did include the option of following your recipe and use the baking sheet.

                              paulj

                              1. re: paulj

                                This chow recipe for cream scones using grated butter was the last scone recipe that I tried:
                                http://www.chow.com/recipes/10918

                                1. re: paulj

                                  I looked at the scone pan, and I'm wondering why I would buy that? Does it cook differently that you know of? Or help with the shape?
                                  I am a sucker for a good baking pan for sure.

                                2. re: paulj

                                  I apologize to you for coming off short. I have felt like you know what all day. You are right that should work, just be careful with the dough, It really makes a difference that you don't let your hands heat the butter in the dough.
                                  It would be a good idea for me to look at the pan too.

                                  1. re: chef chicklet

                                    Here's a chow recipe for sweet potato biscuits which stresses minimal handling. It also uses grated butter, which lets you incorporate the butter with a quick stir. It has less sugar than a typical scone recipe, and also no egg.

                                    http://www.chow.com/recipes/10886

                                    1. re: paulj

                                      I love sweet potato! and this recipe looks very nice, think I'll try it. It would be lovely on the table for Thanksgiving!

                              2. re: paulj

                                I just made a batch of oatmeal scones following a recipe in Joy of Cooking. The recipe called for rolling the dough into a circle and cutting it into wedges - the classic method.

                                But to keep things simple I just sprayed my 10" aluminum dutch oven with baking spray, and dumped in the dough. I patted it out evenly and scored it. Following baking I refreshed the scores, and took the pieces out.

                                I was quite happy with the result. Sure the pieces have a cut side, more like cornbread, than the rounded edges of biscuits that are baked on a sheet. But otherwise there aren't any obvious disadvantages to baking scones in a rimmed pan.

                                Scones baked in the divided Nordicware would be different, in that each piece would have crusty edges all the way around. Again the cornbread analogy comes to mind. Some like cornbread baked in a way that enhances the crusty edges (e.g. hot cast iron skillet). There are even corn bread pans with molded wells for individual cakes. In fact the Nordicware pan probably could be used for cornbread.

                                There's recent thread about 'touch of grace' biscuits. These have a really wet dough, that has to be handled with floured hands, and baked closely packed in a rimmed pan. Most scone dough isn't that wet, so it can be baked 'free form' as well.

                                South Texas has a traditional 'pan de campo' (country bread), which is essentially a biscuit dough baked in a single large round in a dutch oven.

                                Do you think Scottish cowboys make dutch oven scones?

                                paulj

                          2. re: KrazyB

                            I got 8 regular sized.. wihtout knowing what a mini scone pan looks like, I would guess it would be fine. But you will probably want to just double it... I ate 4 in the 30 minutes after I made my first batch. I am on batch 4 now.

                            1. re: alex8alot

                              you're living up to your name, alex8alot! ;-D

                              1. re: alex8alot

                                I'm so glad you like them! You need to try my dried cherry and pecan ones, or the blueberry. Awesome, sorry but they are better that Starbuck's, ask my best friend. She is the one that got me started making these, she asked me to try to beat their recipe. And she can eat the whole plate, she and her hubby fight over them.

                                1. re: chef chicklet

                                  ahem.... clearly I have an unhealthy and endless appetite for scones, and for you to mention two recipes with such promise and not provide shows that you must want me to beg.... ok.... this is me begging. I have finished up all of my puree for your other scones, and I am willing to move ahead. please!

                                  1. re: alex8alot

                                    I just got back in, I'll post the cherry pecan recipe in the morning.
                                    Truly the dried cherries taste like candy. This one is my favorite. No maybe the raspberry, nooooo maybe the blueberry. Rats.

                                    1. re: alex8alot

                                      There you are! I forgot to bookmark you and lost the request for the dried cherry scones. But now here it is.
                                      Don't be selling my recipe now! Actually take the procedure and mix your dried fruits or fresh fruit. I make blueberry too just swap the fruit and nuts out. Just toss the fruit in sugar first. Raspberry with almonds is nice, buttermilk works great, any combo. You don't have to use the KA flour, but after baking about a trillion, I did prefer it.

                                      Cherry Pecan Scones
                                      Preheat oven to 375 degrees
                                      Large baking sheet with silpat or lined with parchment paper

                                      Ingredients
                                      2 Cups Flour – King Arthur’s is my preferred brand..
                                      2 tsp baking powder
                                      1 egg
                                      1 T vanilla
                                      ½ tsp sea salt
                                      ¼ cup Plus 2 T fine baker’s sugar
                                      ½ cup ice cold butter
                                      ½ cup chopped pecans
                                      ½ cup ice cold whipping cream
                                      ½ cup Trader Joe’s Bing cherries

                                      For the topping
                                      1 egg beaten
                                      1 T whipping cream
                                      Wilton’s Sugar – large crystals

                                      Cut butter into cubes and refrigerate until ready to use

                                      Sift the flour, salt, baking powder and sugar into a large bowl
                                      Cut the butter into the flour mixture with pastry blender until resembles coarse meal
                                      In a smaller bowl whisk the egg, cream and vanilla – add to the dry mixture mixing with a fork, and stir until just combined – do not over mix! Then add the nuts and cherries.
                                      Pour the dough mix onto a lightly floured board and pat into a 7 inch 1 to 1 ½ inch high disk. Cut into in half then quarters and then in eights as evenly as possible.

                                      Place the scones on a baking sheet with silpat or parchment paper – this ensures even browning on the bottom

                                      Mix 1 egg with the 1 T of cream and brush the tops with the cream-egg mixture then sprinkle generously with the sugar crystals.

                                      Bake at 375 degrees for 17 minutes and no longer! This will ensure a moister scone than normally expected.

                                      Another small tip, I keep the cubed butter and whip cream in the containers that I'll use for them in the fridge/ everything is really cold and I work very quickly.
                                      Sharon

                                      1. re: chef chicklet

                                        thank you so much chef chicklet. I won't lie and pretend that I have NOT been checking back here every 2.5 hours for this recipe! 17 is indeed the magic number, I defer to chef chicklet scone wisdom!

                                        1. re: alex8alot

                                          You are hilarious! I enjoy watching my best friend eat my scones, she can put them away like nobody's business. Sounds like you are a scone lover too. The reason I even started to perfect the scone was because she bought a raspberry scone from SB daily. I challenged that I could beat it. She now can make her own anytime she chooses.
                                          Have fun!

                                2. re: KrazyB

                                  8 After you make your disk that is about 1 1/1 inches high 7 inch diamter. ( yes I do use a ruler) cut the disk in half, then fourths and then in 8ths.
                                  Carefully transfer them to the silpat, then brush with cream and then sugar them or put nuts. These scones were made for this particular technique. I can't promise they will be as moist because they are smaller. Trial and error, just watch the cooking time, shorten it a bit.

                              2. Ingredients

                                8 oz. of self raising flour
                                3/4 C. cold mashed pumpkin
                                1/2 tsp. of ground nutmeg
                                2 oz. of butter
                                1 egg
                                2 oz. of sugar
                                1/2 tsp. of salt (optional

                                Directions

                                Cream the butter and sugar, add lightly beaten egg, mix in sifted flour and nutmeg, with salt if liked. Mix in pumpkin. Knead lightly on floured surface then roll or pat out to about 1/2 inch thick. Cut with a sharp cutter and place on a lightly greased tray (or one covered with baking paper) and bake in a very hot oven for 10-12 minutes. Serve warm with sweet or savory toppings.

                                1. Joy of Baking has an extensive section on scones
                                  http://www.joyofbaking.com/SconesIntr...

                                  In this 'traditional' Scottish recipe, the dough is rolled out to 1/2", and cut into rounds.
                                  http://www.rampantscotland.com/recipe...

                                  The Nordicware pan might work best with a soft sticky dough, one which benefits from the support of the pan sides. There are some Southern biscuit doughs which are so soft that they have to be formed with floured hands. They are baked closely packed, so they rise rather than spread out.

                                  2 Replies
                                  1. re: paulj

                                    that's very useful info paulj, thank you. I plan to increase my scone repertoire and palate until I am forced to officially retire all button fly pants and move exclusively to lycra!

                                    1. re: alex8alot

                                      Viva la spandex!

                                  2. After tasting a store bought package of pumpkin scones (they smelled good through the package!), I wondered how much different homemade pumpkin scones would taste, or at least those purchased elsewhere, such as at Whole Foods or at a bakery.

                                    I bought the scones at Trader Joe's, and while they were as dry as I expected and hoped for, they had an unchallenging flavor. The ingredients used one would expect to produce a richly flavored product, but I found it too mild to my taste. I wanted a much stronger taste of pumpkin and spices. (I found another Trader Joe's product had the same property - their brand of Latkes, potato pancakes, had a very clean taste, and was made with healthy ingredients - canola oil, egg whites, and few other ingredients, resulting in a relatively low fat result, as was the case with this scone, even though butter was used).

                                    What I did like about the product is that its ingredients were healthy, as I have found the case to be with most Trader Joe products, but I wonder if it is in the nature of scones to have a flavor such as pumpkin be reduced? I haven't had scones in a long time, and I am glad I have not brought them into my place in a very long time. They can easily become my next addiction. I look forward to my next exploration of pumpkin scones, either homemade or storebought.

                                    What hot drink do you find goes best with the scone? I could go for either coffee or tea, perhaps Chai, with its spices. Maybe drinking the Chai with Trader Joe's Pumpkin Scone with infuse it with more of a spicy flavor!

                                    2 Replies
                                    1. re: FelafelBoy

                                      A few possibilities for increasing the pumpkin flavor (as opposed to pumpkin spice flavor):
                                      - taste your pumpkin puree before seasoning, trying to judge how strong its flavor is
                                      - use a squash that has a reputation for flavor. My suggestion is a Japanese style kambocha
                                      - peel as little of the skin as possible - at least for kambocha a lot of the flavor is supposed to be in or just under the skin
                                      - cook by roasting. Steaming would be better than boiling
                                      - try drying the puree, and grind that; or find a source for dehydrated pumpkin
                                      - experiment with sweet potatoes instead of squash
                                      - try muffins instead of scones, where you can use more puree.

                                      paulj

                                      1. re: paulj

                                        Thanks for the suggestions coming from a pro!

                                        Your suggestion regarding muffins makes sense - I had forgotten that the flavor in muffins would be stronger for obvious reasons. Come to think of it, I'd think that the very nature of scones would mute or diminish additional flavorings. But, in general, I find that Trader Joe's does lessen the flavoring of its products. I have heard this also on its bottled ready to use curry/korma sauces.