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removing brownies from the pan

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  • drcmk Oct 29, 2007 07:25 PM

I use the Brownie recipe from the unsweetened chocolate box and it is delicious. But I can NEVER neatly remove the brownies from the pan. They end up a yummy crumbly mess. I've tried lining the pan with foil and parchment paper without success. The parchment paper was the worst, the brownies really stuck. Any suggestions?

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  1. Did you "prepare" the pan before you put the parchment in? Butter and then flour (shake out the excess) or (easier) one of the non-stick baker's sprays (Baker's Joy or Pam...I'm sure there are other makers as well) that have flour in the can along with the non-stick spray. A quick spray of the pan, put the parchment down and then go ahead with the brownies.

    I also have much better luck when I let the brownies sit in the pan for only about 10 minutes or so and then get them out of there. If they cool all the way, any fat that will help them slide out re-solidifies and it's a mess.

    2 Replies
    1. re: ccbweb

      I usually use either Crisco or butter, but I don't flour the pan. Do you think that makes the difference? I will try it next time.

      1. re: drcmk

        I've found it does make a difference; hopefully, it will for you, too. Good luck!

    2. An aluminum foil "sling" does the trick when it's important to get brownies or other bar cookies out in one piece. Cut a piece of foil long enough so it overhangs your pan several inches on each side and press it into the pan. Then grease the foil (or spray it with baking spray). (I'm told nonstick foil works great in this application, but i haven't tried it.) Add dough/batter and bake as usual. Then cool 10-15 mins, lift of the sling, and peel the foil back from the cake. ccweb is right--best to do this before it's still a bit warm.

      1. I picked up a great tip from CI years ago, about lining the pan with foil. Basically- you take one length of foil, making sure it's the width of the pan, but long enough that a couple of inches hangs over both sides (like handles). Then do a second piece going across the pan, same way (I know, it sounds more complicated describing it than it really is- you might check their site to see if they have step-by-step pics). Spray the whole thing with nonstick spray, fill with batter, bake. Once the brownies have cooled, use the "handles" of the bottom piece of foil to lift the entire brownie layer out to cut.

        1 Reply
        1. re: sweet ginger

          CI also recommends non-stick aluminum foil as a good solution for this problem.

        2. I usually use a metal (not non stick) pan and lightly coat with PAM(not the spray with flour) and they come out clean each time. I also only wait about 10 minutes after pulling them out of the oven. I've also had success using a parchment paper sling, but again I don't leave the brownies in the pan to cool completely.

          1. Echoing all the others that suggest a foil sling, sprayed with non-stick. I spray with Trader Joe's flour/oil mixture and have never had a problem. My brownies always come out wonderfully.

            1. Three things, you might be leaving it in the oven too long. Also, after 12 to 15 minutes I use a spatula to fold the over-cooking edges toward the middle of the cake pan. I prefer a glass cake pan.

              1. Let it cool a long, long time (I've read recommendations for overnight) before trying to take it out.

                (I guess this works for some better than others.)

                1. I've purchased 13" by 17" sheets of light-weight "reusable parchment" at my local specialty shop. Am I allowed to give brand names or company addresses here? It's a silicone sheet, I'll bet. I've cut out circles for all my cake and springform pans, rectangles for my 1/2 sheet pans. This stuff lasts for years. You just wash, dry, store. I roll the pieces and store them in the sturdy cardboard tubes that plastic wrap comes wrapped around. There's a way to make a one-piece insert for a loaf pan or a square. I saw a chef do it on TV once, and I've used it with paper parchment ever since. I plan to make inserts with this reusable stuff for my squares and loaf pans because it creates the sides as well as the bottom.

                  1. I haven't had that problem but you can also buy silicone treated parchment paper.