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2007 Cookbook / Chef Bio / food writing releases?

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It's getting time to make the Christmas list, and I'm trying to get a handle on which food-related books to ask for. So far I see that Bourdain has a "companion" book for No Reservations...but not a lot else is coming up in my searches. Any new _Heats_, Ruhlman of_a_Chefs, etc? Best Food Writing compilations?

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  1. I was just at my corner bookstore (aptly named The Corner Bookstore) and saw a new compendium out from The New Yorker of some of their food pieces - looked interesting.

    8 Replies
    1. re: MMRuth

      I also picked up The Ominvore's Dilemma - which is now in paperback.

      1. re: MMRuth

        The store now has a display of cookbooks and related books and this one caught my eye in the window - Lebanese/Syrian cooking. Some other interesting things too - I need to go back when they are open to explore further:

        http://www.ecookbooks.com/p-20674-sah...

        1. re: MMRuth

          MMRuth -
          Is this the address of The Corner Bookstore?

          1313 Madison Ave, New York - (212) 831-3554

          I'm popping down to NYC today and may try to squeeze in a quick visit. Do they have limited hours?

          Thanks.

          1. re: MMRuth

            Just came back from a visit to Kitchen Letter & Arts and picked up Sweet Myrtle & Bitter Honey - a new Sardinian cookbook:

            http://www.chowhound.com/topics/456881

            1. re: MMRuth

              that sounds good
              I've recently had several bottles of Sardinian wine that were really nice
              and really cheap
              Maybe it's time for a Sardinian renaissance in NYC . . .

              1. re: pitu

                We've been exploring Italian wines, but so far haven't gotten past Sardinia and Sicily - the advantage being that they are relatively reasonably priced. We've been using this book as our guide - as an extra bonus, there's a recipe in each region discussed, and the porchetta recipe is wonderful (I've posted it on HC):

                http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASI...

                1. re: MMRuth

                  MMRuth -- we are sooooo on the same page
                  nero d'avola was flavor of the month around here for a good long time
                  if you go to the site of the wine store of the Batali/Bastianich empire, you can subscribe to the weekly wine email from Sergio Esposito @italianwinemerchant.com
                  I've had great luck cribbing from that and Babbo's wine list online

                  on mock porchetta, the one in Zuni is stellar,
                  and was written about on the HC board abundantly a year or two ago

                  1. re: pitu

                    I actually get that - thanks! And have loved cooking from the Sardinian cookbook by the way - don't know if you saw my posts on HC about it.

        2. I'm pretty interested in "Dolce Italiano: Desserts from the Babbo Kitchen" by Gina DePalma
          (It's a read, as well as recipes.)
          The other dessert book I have (and love) is David Lebovitz "Room For Dessert"

          Also interested in Judith Jones' “The Tenth Muse: My Life in Food”
          She was the editor for many of the greats - including Julia Child, Marcella Hazan, Claudia Roden, Edna Lewis and Marion Cunningham. But I haven't actually had it in hand yet...
          http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/24/din...

          1. I posted a note about the Cordon Bleu book, 'The Sharper Your Knife" that I hear on NPR. I have't read it but it appears to be getting really good reviews and also contains recipes. The author's story sounds inspirational.

            I did read the book by the former server at Per Se in New York, "Service Included." Well written and insightful, doesn't contain any recipes.

            Michael Ruhlman has a new book out ''The Essentials of Cooking." I just got "Alone in the Kitchen with an Eggplant" and the initial stories I've read are quite engaging.

            Another book someone recommened was "Mediterrean Summer" about a private chef on a wealthy couple's yacht. Sounds like a good escape book.

            MX

            1. These are exactly what I was looking for. Thank you. Please keep them coming!

              1. Alice Waters also has a new book out
                "The Art Of Simple Food Notes, Lessons, And Recipes From A Delicious Revolution"
                again, I have not looked at it
                but
                the Chez Panisse books are so good, and Waters being who she is . . .

                What did you ask for last year?
                For me, it was that gorgeous Phaidon book, "Breakfast Lunch Tea"
                (I am 100% a sucker for good art book design. The recipes are good, but mostly I like it because it's pretty)
                (/roll eyes)

                This year I've also totally enjoyed "Eat Pray Love"
                Not a chef book, or a cookbook, but the first section is a highly food-centric Italy trip.

                1. I recently bought The Tenth Muse -My Life in Food by Judith Jones. I also bought California Dish by Jeremiah Tower and I Hear America Cooking by Betty Fussel from book closeouts.
                  I have the Art of Simple Food. J. Tower takes a lot of pokes at the mighty - warrented or not.

                  1. The Sharper the Knife, the Less You Cry by Kathleen Flinn is very worthwhile - vivid description of the experience of attending Le Cordon Bleu in Paris - the author's personality comes through in a good way - her personal life enters into the story but not in a cloying way. The recipes ending each chapter are a propos to the content of same - some are Cordon Bleu, some family recipes - mostly appealing. Her recipe writing style is very clear and immediate (one can imagine oneself cooking along with her). Most enjoyable.

                    1. Now I see Ruhlman has a new book, which he talks about on his blog
                      http://blog.ruhlman.com/
                      I have not seen this one either, but I love that it riffs on Strunk & White’s Elements Of Style
                      It's called The Elements of Cooking

                      1. Are you looking for books about food as opposed to cook books? I have read all three of Ruth Reichl's books and absolutely loved them. Garlic and Sapphires, Comfort me with Apples, and Tender to the Bone would be enjoyed by all Chowhounds since they are sprinkled with her favorite recipes and chock-full of touching and humorous stories about her lifelong passion and profession with food.

                        1. Marco Pierre White's memoir, The Devil in the Kitchen also sounds promising...got a great review in the NYT book review

                          1. Marlena Spieler has a new one out..Yummy Potatoes. I have several of hers and really enjoy them.

                            1 Reply
                            1. re: melly

                              I'm in Portland and saw Michael Ruhlman talking about his new book on a panel at the bookfest here. 'The Elements of Cooking.' It's a great primer - modeled after Strunk & White's Elements of Style, the writing classic. There's only one recipe in the book - for veal stock. Very useful, especially for decoding kitchen terms.His theory is that you don't need loads of gadgets, you need a knife, a cuttig board, a good saute pan and that's bout it. He starts out with the most important things in cooking, including the incredible importance of salt. It's a slim volume, but a good reference book.

                              The panel also included Kathleen Flinn, who wrote The Sharper Your Knife, the Less You Cry. I just finished her book and it's superb. (I started another thread about it). Very interesting insight into Le Cordon Bleu. So I recommend this too, especially for francophiles. Her writing is engaging, and there's a recipe tied to each chapter.

                              On the panel too was Nicole Mones, the author of The Last Chines Chef. I got her book but haven't read it yet. It has excellent reviews on Amazon. (This is a food-related novel, rather than a non-fiction book; it sounded very interesting, too.)

                              MX