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Need a good Buttercreme recipie

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  • Rene2 Oct 11, 2007 12:34 PM
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hello all!! I am new here and was hoping someone might be able to help me with a good buttercreme recipie...... I am looking for a thick consistancy little rich , and not* taste like icing sugar or vanilla...... smooth taste , not an italian buttercreme

I recently had a piece of a local grocery store cake and the icing was much like I described above.....

Thankyou for your help :-)

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  1. I tend to use Alton Browns buttercream recipe when I make cakes at home.

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recip...

    14 Replies
    1. re: Kelli2006

      Hi Kelli, This is close to my Italian buttercreme, it is a nice tasting buttercreme, I use this one when I am not doing any piping or embelishments...

      I'm just trying to find one similar to the Loblaws buttercreme I recently had, it was fantastic! and you could not taste the icing sugar at all, it was a pure white icing where as the buttercreme with the cooked simple syrup is slightly beige..

      thanx for your help!

      1. re: Rene2

        Have you asked Loblaws for their buttercream recipe? Most bakeries are happy to share recipes. The beige color can be from the vanilla they used, and that can be changed.

        This is the recipe I used when I worked in a bakery. http://www.pastrychef.com/Basic-Butte...

        1. re: Kelli2006

          I thought about asking but I just figured they wouldn't give it to me, If they did use vanilla it was the clear vanilla as the icing was pure white , and if they did use it, they used the perfect* amount as you did not get a blast of vanilla in your pallet , like some of the buttercremes I have tasted,

          I have your recipie here thankyou, I may give this a try but not sure how to read the measurments, what does this (#) symbol represent ? is it cups, also the icing sugar has X times on it , not sure what that means...

          thx for your help

          1. re: Rene2

            The # designation is pounds. (this is a commercial recipe). The recipe works fine with standard powdered sugar.

            Danna,
            All buttercreams will be slightly tinted because of the yellow tint of butter. The yellow tint will be more pronounced in winter than summer if the cows are allowed to roam in the pasture. Buttercreams made with 100% shortening will be pure white, but the mouth feel is not something that many people prefer.

            1. re: Kelli2006

              ok great thankyou!

              I did get a mouth feel of shortening from this Loblaws cake, but not like some of the buttercreme recipies I have tried, I think this one had a fair bit of creme in it...... I'll give your recipie a go and see how it works for me... I use "Redpath" icing sugar, from our local grocery, and I also buy it in bulk at our local bulk store, I believe it is the same icing sugar as what I buy.

            2. re: Rene2

              10x on icing sugar refers to how fine the sugar is. You should see it on the box of powdered sugar.

          2. re: Rene2

            I don't know how you could make icing with butter and it not be slightly beige. The only pure white frosting I've ever eaten has been made w/ shortening as far as I can tell. I could be wrong, of course and would be happy to be enlightened.

            1. re: danna

              Perhaps they made it with a vanilla-infused vodka

              1. re: weezycom

                No, i mean the butter (being yellow or beige) makes the icing beige. I don't think the vanilla has anything to do with it.

          3. re: Kelli2006

            Kelli, can you comment at all on any problems you might have had when making this buttercream? Were you happy with the butter to sugar ratio? Are you glad you used whole eggs instead of just egg whites, and do you think a pasteurized egg product could be substituted? Did you have any issues with the set-up of the buttercream? I only ask because of all of the negative comments that people on the food network made about being unable to get this icing to set-up correctly. I know you are a pastry chef and might have some interesting insights. Thanks in advance!

            1. re: Laura D.

              I have never used a recipe exactly. If any recipe seems a bit loose I will automatically add a bit of sugar to stiffen it up. Weather and your ingredients make a huge difference, and you need to understand that there is no perfect recipe. I will tailor my recipes from winter to summer because of weather, age of my ingredients and what I can obtain. There are no recipe police and nobody certifies a recipe to be correct.

              IMVHO, Proper technique and experience is far more important that perfect ingredients and $5000 worth of tools. You cannot be afraid to make a mistake, but you must learn from it.

              I don't cook for anyone who needs pasteurized products, so I dont use them. The buttercream should always be used chilled, but there is fine line between chilled and too stiff to work with. If it is too cold, you will have cracks and it will pull up your scratch coat. I tend to like it about 36-40F, but I have warm hands, and that may be too cold for some.

              1. re: Laura D.

                I think that AB's recipe could have been a little more detailed, such as telling to what temperature the sugar should be cooked to, and how much should the eggs be beaten (which is a long time). Most recipes I've seen have up to half butter by weight. If you use egg whites, the butter cream will be paler than with whole eggs. The corn syrup is probably used to keep the sugar from crystalizing while boiling and can be omitted.
                Is Loblaws buttercreme really buttercream or is it icing? I've never seen pure white buttercreme that didn't have additives to make it white.

                1. re: chocolateman

                  I always cook sugar syrups for buttercream to the softball stage.

                  Egg whites tend to be beaten to soft peaks.

                  Corn syrup can be used to prevent crystallization, but it will also give a shine to the finished product.

                  Chocolateman, I recently read your reply to the knife thread, and I would guess that you have worked in the industry. Thank you for your detailed input.

                  1. re: chocolateman

                    >>Is Loblaws buttercreme really buttercream or is it icing? I've never seen pure white buttercreme that didn't have additives to make it white.<<<

                    Hmmm, if it were icing would it not taste like icing sugar? but still good point , maybe it was just an icing.... if it is - it sure was good!!! This delima is going to drive me crazy, I realised today that I won't let this rest until I call Loblaws myself and ask them lol.......... slightly obstinate just a little :-)