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when pot roast goes horribly wrong....

j
jessi20 Sep 26, 2007 05:46 AM

I made pot roast last night and it was bad.....really, really bad. I can't understand it. I have a no fail recipe I have been using all my adult life. My family loves it. there are never leftovers.
I believe the culprit is round roast. I bought an extremely giant whole round that was to good of a deal to pass up on. I cut it into four roasts......froze the other three and made a pot roast last night. It was so dry and disgusting that I could not serve it. It breaks into a dry sawdust when you try to slice it. A pot roast.....dry?

So.......now I have a roast uneaten sitting in my fridge that I have no idea how to try and salvage it. I hate wasting food and can't bear to throw it away. I was thinking maybe I could try to break it up into really small peices and mix it with a gravy for shepherds pie, however I am concerned that it will be more of a saw dust pie. Any ideas?

Also..........I am not attempting a pot roast with the rest of the meat. What can I do with the rest of the meat I have frozen? I have about 10-12 pounds still in the freezer.

  1. coney with everything Sep 26, 2007 06:04 AM

    I had this happen when I attempted brisket--it came out tough and flavorless. My fix was to put it in the crockpot with some wine and barbeque sauce, whatever spices looked good, and a chopped up onion, and let it go for the day. We ended up with very good bbq shredded beef.

    1 Reply
    1. re: coney with everything
      k
      Kelli2006 Sep 26, 2007 10:03 AM

      I agree with the crock pot for salvage purposes. Use a commercial sauce with plenty of sugar as that will tend to draw moisture into the meat. Give the offending roast a rough chop and reheat it with sauce, sautéed onions and spices of your choice.

      The remaining roast can be ground into burger or used for chili, stew or similar ends. You might want to add some pork fat/ sausage if it is very lean.

    2. bbqboy Sep 26, 2007 06:30 AM

      Grind it and make beef salad sandwiches.
      Even though any roast can be a pot roast, I guess, Only a 7 bone roast is a "real" pot roast to me.

      1. d
        Diane in Bexley Sep 26, 2007 06:50 AM

        My family is into bloody rare meat, not big pot roast lovers. I have had good success marinating round roast, cooking at high heat and serving medium rare. You need to let rest covered for 15-20 minutes and carve very thin. You can try a teriyaki or Italian dressing based marinade. If you need more specifics on how to roast or marinade recipes, let me know. The leftovers from this roast also make excellent roast beef sandwiches thinly sliced on ciabatta bread with horseradish mustard mayo dressing.

        3 Replies
        1. re: Diane in Bexley
          j
          jessi20 Sep 26, 2007 07:58 AM

          do you think this roast could survive medium to medium well done this way? my picky kids will not eat anything less then medium. the teriyaki sounds really good actually........do you just buy a marinade or do you you make your own? would love the recipe.

          1. re: jessi20
            pilotgirl210 Sep 26, 2007 09:02 AM

            I make a simple but very tasty teriyaki thusly:

            In a Ziploc baggie, add half a cup to a cup of low-sodium soy sauce (depending on how much meat you're serving); a tablespoon or two of either freshly minced garlic or dry garlic granules, which I prefer; an equal amount of ground ginger; a quarter cup to half a cup of dry white wine; and a quarter cup to half a cup of sugar (I use Splenda). Marinate beef up to two hours (no longer to avoid toughness) and chicken up to overnight. I've used this recipe for years and it is simple and delicious.

            1. re: jessi20
              d
              Diane in Bexley Sep 26, 2007 09:11 AM

              Jessi, honestly I would be afraid to cook it to medium let alone well done. Round is a tough piece of meat. There are 2 teriyaki methods I use, if I am feeling lazy, I use plastic bag, throw in Kikkoman Teriyaki sauce, a little orange juice, garlic and some honey. Or, in glass measuring cup, put in 1 cup good soy sauce, 2T dark sesame oil, 1/2 cup sherry or sake, 1/3 cup canola oil, 1/2 cup fruit juice (pineapple, tangerine, lemon, mango), grated rind of citrus (optional), 2T chopped minced garlic, 1/2 tsp black pepper. Don't add salt, soy sauce is very salty. Marinate roast, flank steak, chix breast for minimum of 1 hour and as long as overnight. I boil the marinade for 10 min (to kill bacteria), reduce slightly and serve with rice or pasta. If you try this and make to medium, curious as to how it will turn out - share feedback. I agree with other posters on BBQ beef - Good Luck!

          2. j
            JGrey Sep 26, 2007 07:00 AM

            Cook's Ill. just did a "quick" beef stew recipe, and I believe the secret was adding unflavored gelatin. All beef cooked that long is actually very dry if you just had the muscle fibers themselves, it's the melted gelatin coating them that gives them the good potroast mouthfeel. Sounds like round didn't have enough to make that happen. So that's what I would do. Turn it into stew and add gelatin back in.

            3 Replies
            1. re: JGrey
              j
              jessi20 Sep 26, 2007 07:59 AM

              approximately how much did you add? one packet to a normal beef stew recipe?

              1. re: JGrey
                d
                Diane in Bexley Sep 26, 2007 09:13 AM

                JGrey, wouldn't it just be easier to buy some chuck or other bones and add them to the stew? Bones have a lot of natural gelatin. The idea of adding powdered gelatin is not sitting well at all, how would you know how much to add and at what point in cooking process?

                1. re: JGrey
                  h
                  happygoluckyinoregon Jan 19, 2014 10:17 AM

                  I have been cooking for 60 years and had my first horrible pot roast failure. My mistake was trying to save on FAT and buying Top Round roast instead of the Chuck. I put it in crockpot with broth, etc. and let it go to 8 hours as recommended and it was SAWDUST. I can't find a remedy, as the meat is so dry it would be useless to even shred and put in the gravy. Never again - I'll stick to cutting up the other one in cubes and making a stew and not overcooking it.

                2. a
                  Alan408 Sep 26, 2007 07:39 AM

                  Roast the remaining roasts low and slow. You can start with high heat or not, cook at 225 for 1 hour per pound.

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: Alan408
                    rockandroller1 Sep 26, 2007 07:40 AM

                    could you make a roast beef hash with what you've already cooked? Add some bacon fat or something to make it a little more tasty/rich?

                    I would cook the rest in the crockpot done various ways.

                  2. Richelle Sep 26, 2007 07:56 AM

                    oh! How about a fricassee...I think it would be like a hash...unsure, fry onions, potatoes, then add the meat, herbs, salt and pepper and let it cook another twenty minutes. Serve it with any chutney, home made ketchup(or commercial)) and voila!

                    1. scubadoo97 Sep 26, 2007 08:00 AM

                      Do you usually use round? I find it a very lean cut that does not lend it self well to slow braising for pot roast. To me chuck is the king of pot roast. Enough fat and connective tissue to result in a nice moist, tender pot roast with good flavor. If you want to go further and try to make a BBQ beef, I would cut it up in smaller pieces and cook it with flavorful liquid till it breaks down and you can shred it. Add BBQ sauce and allow the sauce to meld into the meat.

                      1 Reply
                      1. re: scubadoo97
                        j
                        jessi20 Sep 26, 2007 08:30 AM

                        no i do not normally use round but I do pot roast in a crock pot so I figured it would come out ok. guess i was wrong. another member suggested the bbq beef idea as well though which is an interesting idea.

                      2. C. Hamster Sep 26, 2007 09:49 AM

                        Any meat that is cooked for too long will dry out, even if it's cooked in liquid. It's simple physics. It may be "tender" and disintegrating, but the liquid that was once within the meat will have left the cells and either evaporated or gone into the cooking liquid.

                        I made roladen with very thinly sliced round steak. Maybe try slicing one of the remaining ones up thin while it's still partially frozen?

                        1. yayadave Sep 26, 2007 10:08 AM

                          I wonder if you could use the rest of those roasts cut up for ragu.

                          1. danhole Sep 26, 2007 01:43 PM

                            I usually use a chuck roast for pot roast, but have used a round roast before. The difference, I think, is to not cook it as long as the chuck roast, because the round doesn't have enough fat in it. Also I would use more liquid with a round than a chuck. Maybe you should look at a beef website, like Beef, it's what's for dinner, and see how they recommend to cook it. But don't get rid of the others!

                            For your leftovers you could chop it up, make a brown gravy, simmer it until juicy, and serve over pasta/noodles.

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