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saran wrap "plastic wrap" [moved from General Chowhounding Topics]

Does any one love it? Try as I might -even just to cover a dish for microwaving-I cannot get it to tear and cover properlly! It seems like a great idea-any thoughts.It always sticks to itself before the use that I am trying for!

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  1. Perhaps not the prettiest suggestion, but -- after many years of struggling! -- we bought the 3000 mile roll (sq.ft. actually) at Costco. There is nothing magic about this particular Kirkland wrap (you can buy these super-sized rolls at any super box store). It has, however, solved several problems.

    First, it has lasted us about a year...and we use it for everything! Second, the weight of the box keeps it down on the counter to free both hands. Finally, the slicing bar has remained very sharp and we almost have finished this roll.

    The ugly of it is: it's ugly on the counter and it does take up some valuable space. Perhaps you can knit a cover for it! Seriously, I am glad to give up the space for the ease of use.

    Ideally, I would love to put it on a rolling cart (with a flat-top surface for both the wrap and the about-to-be-wrapped) and just roll it to wherever I am in the kitchen...have it come to me. Then, when I am not using it, I might like to roll it into a closet.

    1 Reply
    1. re: liu

      We are installing a new kitchen. Does anyone know who supplies dispensers for the large rolls of saran wrap and foil? We would like to integrate these rolls into our kitchen drawers.

    2. When I saw this post, my blood pressure went ballistic! Plastic wrap is getting crappier and crappier. I waste more of it than ever before, and I never fail to saw my finger half off while struggling with it. Sheeesh!

      2 Replies
      1. re: mnosyne

        mnosyne -- My blood pressure is back to normal! Try the huge Costco Kirkland box with the stick-on bar cutter...You can toss your doctor's phone number!

        1. re: mnosyne

          When I started using cling wrap again, I was outraged at how poorly it behaved. I remembered it seemed to be far better forty years ago. Every brand I tried was worse than the next, Reynolds tended to stick to itself right out of the box, a total waste, Dow's various brands didn't cling at all, others just tore apart. I went looking for restaurant wrap, figuring a professional quality product might give me some success.

          I found a manufacturer in Hong Kong, http://www.finevantage.com, one of whose chemists talked to me about the technology underlying cling wrap. (I learned that PVC has great cling wrap qualities and that's why my childhood memories are that the cling wrap of the 60s was so great. It's poisonous, though, and its poison leeches into foods, so, that's why it's no longer used for food.

          )

          I got some sample rolls from him and I am very happy with their great blend of properties. He told me his company makes cling wrap for Market Basket, Good Sense, Harris Teeters and CVP but none of those are available in my area (northeast USA). Apparently, the American chemical companies have a dominant grip on the cling wrap market in the USA. I'm trying to get my local supermarket, ShopRite, to try it, but I have no significant influence with them. I decided to write here, to bring this great alternative to peoples' attention.

        2. LOL I know what you mean! And I had a BF who could do Saran wrap perfectly. I was in constant awe.

          yeah, I do bulk, Costco stuff, the cutting edge hnestly works on those. And makes a nasty cut if you miss and get yourself! Liquid Bandage for those folks like me.

          1 Reply
          1. re: Quine

            No "nasty cuts," Quine, on the bar cutter. The blade is inside/underneath/hidden, and a tab with the cutter slides along to cut the wrap. Even when I am not paying proper attention, I have never cut myself. There is no exposed "zig-zag" metal strip.

            The other nice feature of this bar cutter is that you can cut from either direction: begin on the left and move it to the right, and then cut again from right to left.

          2. It's amazing stuff. Here's the best hint I've ever learned about it. When working to cover something entirely in it, bring the food to the wrap, not the other way around. Stretch out the wrap on a flat surface and put just a very light sprinkling of water on the surface- it will anchor the wrap perectly to it. Ever since learning that trick it has been so much easier to use.

            1. I personally prefer to re-use tupperware or similar as it is a waste of plastic. You can also buy plastic reusable covers in different sizes.
              On microwaving and plastic wrap - how safe is it to use - do the plastics somehow get into our food?

              8 Replies
              1. re: smartie

                I believe on the oven you can get plastic wrap up to 300 or 350 before it melts.

                1. re: smartie

                  According to snopes.com, the claim that microwaving plastic products releases carcinogens is false; go to www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/cookpla...

                  1. re: Stephanie Wong

                    for every article you find that it is good, there is one that says it is bad.

                    would love to see real research by real researchers

                    1. re: jfood

                      I'm thinking jfood failed to read the article or the links provided therein.

                  2. re: smartie

                    I'd advise against putting plastic wrap in the microwave... atleast for more than a couple of minutes on high. Both times I have microwaved things for more than 5 minutes with plastic wrap covering it, I've ended up with plastic shards in my food. Not good!

                    1. re: pollymerase

                      we use glass plates as covers when we heat things in the microwave .....works well and you can see what's happening. not sure if heating saran wrap is good for us but the glass plate is reuseable and easy to wash.

                      1. re: gordon wing

                        This seems like a good idea, gordon wing!
                        Along this same idea, I guess one could use the glass cover that comes with a CorningWare caserole dish -- the one with the glass knob handle.