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The Sushi Bar at Shiro's

eternalX Sep 17, 2007 03:44 PM

I know Shiro's has already enough glowing reviews around here, but I went again (it is next door) last night ans had a wonderful omakase experience with the lady. We started with the Belltown poke, then natu salad (miso sauce with salmon, cucumbers, tuna, etc), then a porcini muchroom broth that was steamed in a tiny tea pot that had exquisite subtle mushroomo flavor (the broth, not the teapot :)).

Next came melt-in-your mouth albacore nigiri, followed by maguro nigiri, followed by a piece of salmon nigiri and mackarel nigiri with a light ginger sauce and pickled onion slice (no soy), followed by a piece of squid nigiri with real wasabi (a customer had brought in a root), followed by a piece of abalone nigiri and scallop nigiri with sea salt (no soy). Next, but not last was two pieces of hamachi and finally a fried "dessert" sushi.

Everything was delicious and it forever ingrained in my head that you can only so Shiro's at the bar. We even had a nice couple conversations with Shiro-san. Sitting at a table is always disappointing for me and I've decided after last night to never do it again.

  1. s
    Simon Oct 1, 2007 10:47 PM

    Oddly, i've had the exact opposite experience in terms of bar/table...i've been there twice when visiting Seattle...the table experience was great, super-friendly service, wonderful fish, etc...the bar meal, with Shiro, was underwhelming, plus i was annoyed that Shiro totally ignored all my requests to avoid certain fish, have a sashimi course first, etc (i speak mediocre-but-throughly-understandable Japanese and usually have pleasant conversations when i do an omakase elsewhere, but twas not the case w/ Shiro)

    1. e
      equinoise Oct 1, 2007 10:36 PM

      As the OP notes, Shiro is widely considered a sushi master who is a integral part of perhaps Seattle's best omakase experience, and having yet to try that, I can't really doubt it. I wonder whether this also means that those not fortunate enough to sit before the man are likely to get inferior sushi. I say this because I visited and sat at a table recently, and while the modest sashimi/sushi omakase ($20/30) we recieved was quite good (esp. the snapper and the hamachi), it was definitely less carefully assembled than a recent, similarly priced chef's choice from Kisaku. I would also say my experiences (at the bar) in Saito's were better. Since Shiro's prices are higher than these two, I have to inquire if Shiro's apprentices are really up to par, or if it is just a question of the interactive experience bringing it together. To be fair, I went late on a Sunday, and the staff in general seemed eager to get out of there.

      1. j
        jmsvss Sep 18, 2007 06:38 PM

        Thank you for the report - you've added a new wrinkle to my dining dilemna during my upcoming Seattle trip!

        1. l
          Leper Sep 17, 2007 06:29 PM

          EternalX, There is another big advantage to sitting at the bar at Shiro's.. Get Shiro talking about golf or his friend Lino's fantastic glass artwork and you'll be amazed what comes your way from his mastery.

          1. barleywino Sep 17, 2007 04:49 PM

            mmm...let us know if he brings in live Santa Barbara uni (in the shell)!

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