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L'as du Fallafel, Paris - hours?

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I had planned on having my first meal in Paris be lunch on a Friday at this place, but then saw elsewhere on this board that it was closed Fridays and Saturdays. Zagat has it opened every day, and the New York Times has it closed on Saturdays only. I'd really love to not have to wait until the Sunday to try it, but will do so if that is the first day it is open after I get there. Does anyone know for sure what days it is open, and what time it opens? Thanks so much in advance for any info.

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  1. It is also closed on Jewish holidays. We are smack dab in the middle of the High Holy Days.Yes it is closed on Saturdays.

    9 Replies
    1. re: roxie

      And what about Fridays? I'll be there the first Friday in October. Thanks.

      1. re: LulusMom

        Open 11 to 7 except Saturdays according to a listing I found on the web. Good place.

        1. re: erica

          They're open till midnight every night except Friday (till 5, 6 or 7 depending on where you look - might depend on the time of year and sundown). And Closed on Saturday. Huge line on Sundays. Was there last night for the second time in 2 weeks... Caution: falafel porn attached.

           
          1. re: sega10028

            Cross the street and get a better falaffel (on their home made pita) at Mi Va Mi. No big lines, either.

            I won't get into the argument about "authentic" falaffel. I just like this a lot.

        2. re: LulusMom

          Aren't they just closed for sabbat? That means from nightfall friday to saturday nightfall (or likely sunday morning)

          1. re: souphie

            Aha! Now this makes sense. And, great for me, would allow for a Friday lunch falafel. Thanks everyone.

            1. re: souphie

              Closed Saturdays. One would imagine that that is the reason for the Saturday closing.. Other days open until 7pm. According to the hours on the site I looked at.

              1. re: erica

                Yeah, my problem was that every site I looked at gave different hours, so I wanted to try to make sure that my Friday lunch was still a possibility.

              2. re: souphie

                Well technically, yes, but unless the staff live nearby or are shabbos goys, they've gotta get home by sundown.

          2. I can't find a better Fallafel since I had one here. You're going to be in heaven. I'm still searching for a good one. I've only heard and read they are closed on Sat.

            2 Replies
            1. re: lexpatti

              They are damn good.

              1. re: lexpatti

                - I hate food snobbery, but I must state that the falafel at l'As are not good.
                - They are edible, but they are not true falafel.
                - Falafel should be crisp on the outside and crumbly on the inside, plus they should be disc shaped and thicker in the middle than the edges.
                - L'As does theirs as small balls that are crumbly outside and soggy inside.
                - For real Falafel in Paris, I suggest you go to El-Bustan on Rue Montorgueil.
                - L'As does have fantastic Moroccan hot sauce in green (devastating) and red (vicious), which makes all the food taste good, even the horrible turkey shawarma.
                - Honestly, do the tourism market a favor and go to Chez Marriane next door for far better food with the same Jewish heritage theme (but don't get the falafel there either).

              2. is this a fancy falafel place? what's the deal? thanks.

                1. Wow, anyone else out there agree with Murex? I'm really interested in a good fallafel, not the other stuff, but would like to stay in the 4th for it. I'll just be getting in from my flight and would like something close to quickly fill the hole left by airplane food (or more likely lack thereof).

                  5 Replies
                  1. re: LulusMom

                    Can't say that I'm a falafel expert, but I do disagree. I've had very satisfying meals at L'as du Fallafel - both falafel and shwarma. It's not expensive so if you're not 100% thrilled it's hardly a waste of money (that sounds like a more lukewarm recommendation than I mean it to, but I'm sure you understand).

                    It is a great place for a quick cheap lunch in Paris and one that I've been back to many times.

                    1. re: KaCHing

                      Yea, it's the most touristy thing I did in Paris but it was a good falafel and like KaCHing said, it isn't expensive. If you don't like it, don't finish it. But I don't think you won't like it.

                      1. re: eternalX

                        Exactly my thinking. People mostly *seem* to like the place and the falafels there. It is very near my hotel, I'll be hungry, I can get it and walk to my first stop and if I don't thoroughly love it, not a lot of harm done. Thanks to both of you for your input.

                        1. re: eternalX

                          I like their sandwiches. I'm not falafel expert... i will say that it's kind of one big pita stuffed with a lot of stuff, including falafel, but the other stuff can overpower the falafel itself. that doesn't bother me, might bother others.

                      2. re: LulusMom

                        - What is served at L'As du Falafel is not proper falafel, it is almost like a fritter made of chickpeas.
                        - A fritter is one highly cooked material enclosing a different and less highly cooked material.
                        - For a fritter, it is acceptable to have a mushy texture inside.
                        - However, falafel is not a fritter, it is a patty made of a uniform material, and that material is not precooked before frying; as such, it should not be mushy inside, because that would mean the inside did not fully cook during frying.
                        - L'As du Falafel has turned a food made of a uniform material into the virtual equivalent of a fritter by allowing the inside to be mushy, because their falafel has the wet center associated with fritters and croquettes.
                        - Falafel must be crisp outside and crumbly inside; the inside must be dry and fully cooked, not pasty and mushy.
                        - The reason that you want the inside to be crumbly and not mushy is because it is supposed to contrast against the moisture provided by the tahini sauce that comes with it.
                        - The analogy is that of eating tortilla chips with salsa, where you dip a crisp chip into moist salsa and experience the chiaroscuro of textures in your mouth.
                        - Now imagine if your chip was half wet and you dip it in the salsa.
                        - Not good.
                        - That is very much what you are doing when you accept a mushy-centered falafel.

                      3. L'as is one of many falafel places on r des Rosiers. It's version is good: crunchy on the outside, spicy and not too dry on the inside. I find it no better than those down the block at Chez Marianne or another toward r. de Vielle du Temple. Part of the mystique of L'as is the long line and the barkers outside taking your orders, and then watching the speedy cooks making them. Go and give L'as a try since it is only 3E.

                        2 Replies
                        1. re: PBSF

                          Agree - it is good falafel but really it is only falafel. I find the one opposite is just as good (and less busy).

                          1. re: PhilD

                            just got back from paris and ate at L'as du fallafel and thought the food was good.On a sunday afternoon about 2pm the wait was half hour to sit down (i'd guess the restaurant can 60-80 people).Inside the price for fallafel was 6.5 euros for falaffel,and 8.5 euro for schwarma.there was a 50 person deep line for takeaway where the fallafels are less priced(i believe 4.50 euro to go).However when you get them to go you can control what accompaniments are put in your falaffel. Hope this clears up any confusion.

                        2. Well, once I got to L'as du Fallafel, it was closed. I think it might actually be closed until the 16th of Oct. (there was a sign on the door, and my french is far from fluent, but I took it to mean something like that). I just walked down another block or two and found another place selling fallafel, got one there and walked on with it. It was absolutely fantastic, so I wasn't heartbroken. Thanks to everyone for their comments. My trip was the best I've had to Paris, foodwise, and I'm sure that is because of all the help I got from Chowhounds.

                          1 Reply
                          1. re: LulusMom

                            This place saves our little behinds on Christmas Eve. The fallafel was quite good, but would I say "best ever"??? No. But definitely worth a visit and a bite!

                          2. When I got to Paris they were closed for a few days (renovations or something) so I simply walked down to the other end of the street and found a place there. I have no comparison with L'as, but I did thoroughly enjoy the falafel - much, much better than anything I can find here (Chapel Hill, NC).

                            1. We literally just arrived back to our flat from our 3rd visit there this week.

                              It's Fri. and we ordered from the Take Away window at approx. 3pm. As we were savoring our last bites, they locked the door into the restaurant and would not accept any new guests to be seated. The Take away window stayed open for about 1/2 hour longer while the guests in the dining room finished up.

                              They were closing for Shabbat (Fri.) but it was our observation that they were trying to make sure that they were closed and at home by the time sunset arrived.

                              Again.....in our week visit Paris, we made sure we made it to the Marais 3 times!!!

                              By the way, my son who has spent lots of time in Israel, says that even though these fall a bit short of those he had there....they come in a very close second. Maybe those who think they are not authentic are comparing them to a different Meditteranean country's version.

                              We thougth they were very yummy! Oh, that Schwarma & Fallafel!!!!!

                              1. hi ive eaten falafel in many places all over the globe, save your time and energy, do not go to this common/toruist/commercial place, food is mediocre, its just a big torurist trap

                                3 Replies
                                1. re: intrepid

                                  Intrepid, could you provide better Parisian falafel options on the thread I started on that topic? I remember good falafels up in Belleville, but that was a good ten years ago.

                                  1. re: lagatta

                                    sorry, no I cannot

                                    1. re: intrepid

                                      We think the L'As felafel is quite good, in fact my daughter wants to return to paris largely to take her south asian boyfriend to this place. Do get it stuffed with the veg extras, they do enhance it and get the hot sauce. Its a very satisfying street meal.

                                      I dont carry a brief for any particular type of felafel - there are so many kinds, from soft to crunchy - with different legumes and different spice/herb mixtures and garnishes - once I had a moroccan felafel with egg, potato and a fantastic hot sauce - sadly that place disappeared 20 yrs ago. I think if you have an open mind you will enjoy the L'As felafel.