HOME > Chowhound > Outer Boroughs >
What have you made lately?
TELL US

Best Japanese in Astoria

bebedebroadway Sep 9, 2007 07:47 PM

I just moved out to Astoria and am looking for some great Japanese food. I LOVE RaiRaiKen in Manhattan, but can't convince myself to make the trek just for their curry rice. What are some good sushi/sashimi, Ramen, and other places in Astoria?

ARE there any?

  1. Harlan Sep 10, 2007 08:34 AM

    Consensus is that there's no "great" Japanese food, but there's some pretty good sushi, especially fusion sushi. I recommend JJ's on 31st Ave and about 37th St., and Bistro 33 on Ditmars and 21st St. The former is a Japanese restaurant with great fusion appetizers (try the edamame dumplings or the apple-tuna sashimi!). The latter is a Japanese-accented New American restaurant with very good fusion sushi rolls and appetizers.

    3 Replies
    1. re: Harlan
      hotdishandkimchi Sep 10, 2007 09:16 AM

      Also, if you like katsu curry, you should check out Nebuta, one of the few Japanese-owned Japanese places in Astoria. They're located right under the Astoria Blvd N/W station near the Triboro.

      1. re: hotdishandkimchi
        Linda Sep 10, 2007 09:47 AM

        nebuta is one of the few japanese-owned places in queens, period. the places i knew of that were japanese-owned were sold off to koreans/chinese.

        the food there is like japanese fast food. just udon and katsu and the likes. don't expect sushi or anything (though i believe there are hand rolls).

        the few times i've been there have been decent and cheap. however, a recent trip from a friend reported that the katsu was pounded to the ground, which is not a common way to eat katsu japanese style (koreans tend to pound the h!ck outta katsu). in addition, the place is a little thrown together and disheveled.

        i do hope this place survives, as it is a welcomed addition to queens.

        1. re: Linda
          hotdishandkimchi Sep 10, 2007 10:08 AM

          I can validate the pounded to the ground complaint. In the beginning, the katsu was a very generous size and was the typical japanese-style thickness. My bf and I always wondered how long that would last at the cheap prices they charged. Nowadays, it's quite thin and thus, not as tasty, but still cheap. However, in a pinch, it does cure a katsu curry craving emergency.

    Show Hidden Posts