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Anual delimma

Candy Aug 11, 2007 05:39 PM

We have a number of well meaning friends with gardens. When we had more time and more sunlight we grew a lot of veg too. We are being treated (?) to their over abubdance but unfortunately most of what we are given goes into the compost, for instance Kirby cukes that are a foot long. Say thanks and compost? On the other hand another friend is making her own goat cheese how can I say "gimme more?"

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    mojoeater RE: Candy Aug 11, 2007 06:58 PM

    Give some of your vegetables to the friend with the goat cheese! perhaps she will reciprocate.

    1 Reply
    1. re: mojoeater
      Candy RE: mojoeater Aug 11, 2007 07:31 PM

      She is the one withh teh over sized kirbys

    2. chowser RE: Candy Aug 12, 2007 07:03 AM

      I'll bet the local food pantry would love to have some fresh produce to give out. The place I volunteer is always happy to get some to give away. On getting goat cheese, offer to exchange something you've baked that they love in exchange for goat cheese. "Hey, I can't get enough of your goat cheese--what if I bake you your favorite xxxxx, in exchange for some more?"

      4 Replies
      1. re: chowser
        Karl S RE: chowser Aug 12, 2007 03:11 PM

        Well, a lot of food pantries are forbidden by local health codes from giving any food away that is not in a tamper-proof sealed package.

        1. re: Karl S
          m
          mojoeater RE: Karl S Aug 12, 2007 03:19 PM

          That's definitely true around here. Won't even take bread.

          1. re: mojoeater
            susancinsf RE: mojoeater Aug 12, 2007 03:36 PM

            Not sure about vegetables, but there are several organizations in the bay area that will come and take your excess (home-grown) fruit. eg:

            http://www.villageharvest.org./

          2. re: Karl S
            chowser RE: Karl S Aug 12, 2007 04:54 PM

            It's worth calling ahead to check. We can take veggies and anything prepackaged from stores but nothing prepared in the home.

        2. Gio RE: Candy Aug 12, 2007 05:01 PM

          I think this is a difficult call for a variety of reasons, but the first one that pops into my brain is - do they use chemical fertilizers in their garden, or are they growing in compost and composted manure? It Does make a difference. You are what you eat, remember.

          It's sweet of your gardening friends to let you share. OTOH I also think it's OK to tell them that you have more this particular time than you can use.

          1 Reply
          1. re: Gio
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            foodstorm RE: Gio Aug 12, 2007 10:33 PM

            I agree with Gio, I see nothing wrong with telling your friends that while you appreciate their generosity, you already have more than you can possibly use and don't want to waste their fine produce.

          2. ccbweb RE: Candy Aug 12, 2007 08:00 PM

            I'd say...maybe its time to learn to pickle? Lots of vegetables take very well to pickling, they'll keep for ages if done properly. Otherwise, I don't see why it should be a problem to decline the offer. Take what you think you can use and urge your friend to find another person to give the rest to.

            3 Replies
            1. re: ccbweb
              Candy RE: ccbweb Aug 12, 2007 08:59 PM

              Oh honey, I've probaby have been making pickes before you were born. Believe me a 12' cuke, especially a kirby is nor picklin foidder

              1. re: Candy
                ccbweb RE: Candy Aug 12, 2007 09:34 PM

                From the Cook's Thesaurus: http://www.foodsubs.com/Squcuke.html
                Kirby cucumber This short, versatile cucumber is used for both slicing and pickling. It's small, with bumpy yellow or green skin. Like the English cucumber, it has a thin skin and inconspicuous seeds. Substitutes: burpless cucumber (much larger

                )

                I'm not sure how one gets such a long version of a Kirby...but it could certainly be sliced up and made into a batch of pickle chips.

                Of course, you can still also just politely decline the offer.

                1. re: Candy
                  m
                  MakingSense RE: Candy Aug 12, 2007 10:07 PM

                  Every now and then, I'll find a Godzilla cuke that escaped my notice in the garden until it was just too damned large to eat as salad or use for a quick fridge pickle. Can't stand to throw stuff out.
                  They're actually good peeled, seeds removed, sliced thin and sauteed quickly in a little clarified butter with some dill. Nice with fish in the summer. Two minute veggie side dish.

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