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Soy sauce for Gyoza?

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franprix Aug 1, 2007 07:52 PM

Does anybody know what kind of soy sauce if used for the dipping sauce for gyoza and those little shrimp/crab dumplings? I used the soy sauce at home which is dark and I know is not the correct one. I have a feeling it's some kind of "light" soy sauce judging from the color at the Japanese restaurants. Anyone know what specific kind/brand to use? Also a recipe? I presumed it was just soy sauce and vinegar. Am I missing anything?

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  1. Pamela RE: franprix Aug 1, 2007 07:55 PM

    I'm not sure what ingredients are in the restaurant dumpling sauces, but whenever I make dumplings at home, I mix the following:

    soy sauce
    vinegar
    a few drops of sesame oil
    chopped garlic and/or chopped ginger
    chopped scallions

    1 Reply
    1. re: Pamela
      geg5150 RE: Pamela Aug 1, 2007 07:57 PM

      I pretty much to the same, but with rice wine vinegar and I add some garlic chili sauce too.

    2. purple goddess RE: franprix Aug 1, 2007 07:58 PM

      red wine vinegar and finely sliced spring onions.

      1. kmh RE: franprix Aug 1, 2007 08:00 PM

        it is a light soy and you should be able to get the kikkoman brand just about anywhere in the world.

        my family lived in japan when i was an infant and my mother did cooking classes there - according to my dad's (japanese) colleagues she is a better japanese cook than their wives. here is her recipe:

        3 tbsp soy sauce (kikkoman or another light soy, tamari would work too (gluten free))
        2 tbsp vinegar (whilst it doesn't specify, white vinegar is commonly used, or sub with rice vinegar)
        1tsp sesame oil
        dash of hot chili oil

        you can play around with this forever. some people in my family love the vinegar, others the chilli. but now you have the base to start with.

        when we talk siu mai then there is another sauce that can be made using mustard of all things!

        6 Replies
        1. re: kmh
          chef chicklet RE: kmh Aug 1, 2007 08:31 PM

          same here, heavy on the chili oil though.
          Will you share the mustard sauce recipe?

          1. re: chef chicklet
            kmh RE: chef chicklet Aug 1, 2007 08:50 PM

            i could, but I'd have to kill you...

            seriously, i just had a look and i can't find it.
            basically you get a mild mustard such as american or french and mix it (probably 1/3 mustard 2/3 soy) maybe a bit more biased toward the mustard than that. dip your finger in to check it as you mix. you'll just know when you've got it right! it's sensational served with siu mai.

            with regard to the other suggestions above:
            i recall the dipping sauces when a table top hibachi was done and one was a soy/garlic mixture and the other a soy/ginger mix. one had scallions in it and the other probably had sesame. I will have to check with mum as i don't have it written down anywhere.

            then there is a shabu shabu dipping sauce that includes soy, tahini and milk. YUM!!!

            I love red wine vinegar but for me that is a taiwanese/chinese thing rather than japanese. but that's just experience and perception...

            as far as recipes go, dipping sauce is up to what you like, if it's just you and your clan. if i don't have chilli oil i will scrape the oil off a jar of chilli paste or similar. sometimes you get some random extra flavours but all for the experience!

            1. re: kmh
              chef chicklet RE: kmh Aug 1, 2007 10:34 PM

              Really! I'll have to try it, thanks!

              1. re: kmh
                chef chicklet RE: kmh Aug 2, 2007 06:02 PM

                kmh! I made the mustard sauce!
                Re-reading you post "but,I'd have to kill..." It suddenly dawned on me that this is one of the two sauces that I loved at a Japanese restaurant called Fujiya's in SF at Embarcadero One that me and the girls would go to for every celebration we could think of. About two years ago, my friend and I were in S, we were going to see if we could go for early dinner and it was no longer there, nor was there a phone listing. It had to be there for 25 years. Too bad we thought it was so good. But about the dipping sauces they were delicious!
                And so I made the mustard sauce - they called it "sesame sauce" because they put a little sesame seed oil in with the mustard and soy sauce. And they would recommend we dip seafood and chicken in it. We would cover our rice, and our salads along with everything else.

                Thank you thank you! I am sitting here eating a green salad drenched with the mustard sauce and having flash backs!!

                Now if we can figure out that other, it was made with onions pureed and then cooked...

                1. re: chef chicklet
                  kmh RE: chef chicklet Aug 2, 2007 10:45 PM

                  well that brought a smile of appreciation to my face.

                  i am not sure of an onion sauce but you reminded me of tempura dipping sauce where grated radish is served on the side and you stir it in to your liking. now that is something i LOVE poured over salad.

            2. re: kmh
              y
              yogurtsoda RE: kmh Aug 2, 2007 09:05 AM

              ditto - when i had japanese roomates this is exactly the sauce they'd make. sometimes they'd add a bit of thinly sliced green onion too.

            3. soypower RE: franprix Aug 1, 2007 08:53 PM

              a friend of mine makes an interesting one w/ kikkoman soy (red cap), rice vinegar, sugar, a lil bit of bonito broth, sliced scallions, and a few drops of chili oil. i could almost slurp it down on it's own. :o)

              1. crosby_p RE: franprix Aug 2, 2007 03:54 AM

                If you live near a Trader Joes, they have a wonderful (and cheap) gyoza dipping sauce that has a cilantro, but not soapy, zing to it. Very tasty!

                1. u
                  UES Mayor RE: franprix Aug 2, 2007 05:24 AM

                  http://www.cooks.com/rec/doc/0,1626,1...
                  how soon we forget how to google!

                  1. hannaone RE: franprix Aug 2, 2007 10:14 AM

                    A very good dipping sauce for Mandu (Korean version of Gyoza):
                    Soy sauce, minced garlic, fine ground chili pepper, a little sugar or honey, some blended onion and asian pear, and some pure toasted sesame oil, all added to taste.

                    1. h
                      houdini RE: franprix Aug 2, 2007 11:02 AM

                      You could always use Ponzu.

                      1 Reply
                      1. re: houdini
                        eclecticsynergy RE: houdini May 25, 2014 08:22 PM

                        Or katsu, even, for a sweet one..

                      2. k
                        KevinKeeling RE: franprix May 25, 2014 04:40 PM

                        Some recipes call for low sodium soy sauce. I personally do not use it. If the soy sauce sits for a while between uses you can dilute with water as it concentrates. Use the brand you like. I always use kikkoman. Some others are a little stronger while others are weaker. Kikkoman is always the same

                        1. Bada Bing RE: franprix May 25, 2014 07:28 PM

                          If I want a touch of sweetness, I use mirin in place of or in addition to straight vinegars. Thumbs up to all the other ingredients mentioned here (although I don't think I've tried red wine vinegar).

                          It's all about balance and tastes. If you can give fresh garlic and ginger some time to steep, like at least 20 minutes, that's all to the better.

                          1 Reply
                          1. re: Bada Bing
                            k
                            KevinKeeling RE: Bada Bing May 26, 2014 09:44 AM

                            I never thought about using mirin. I think I will add a little next time.

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