HOME > Chowhound > San Francisco Bay Area >
What's your latest food project? Tell us about it
TELL US

Where to buy fresh Sangak & Kashk?

r
rdabke Jul 18, 2007 01:06 PM

I need to buy fresh Persian bread Sangak & Persian whey Kashk? What is a good place in the bay area?

  1. Robert Lauriston Jul 18, 2007 01:08 PM

    http://www.chowhound.com/topics/416511

    2 Replies
    1. re: Robert Lauriston
      r
      rdabke Jul 18, 2007 01:28 PM

      Thanks. Do you know if these sell it? I wanted a source from someone who has tested these goods mentioned above.

      1. re: rdabke
        Robert Lauriston Jul 18, 2007 01:31 PM

        Zand has a pretty thorough selection. Phone and ask.

    2. j
      jsxau Jan 6, 2010 03:09 PM

      i just spoke with someone at Middle East Market at 2054 san Pablo Berkeley. He said they have ordered the sangak machine from Iran and may start baking it in a few months, for what THAT is worth. I have researched this and the only places are in Irvine and LA.

      6 Replies
      1. re: jsxau
        Robert Lauriston Jan 6, 2010 04:27 PM

        Super Tehran in Concord bakes bread, though I'm not sure which kinds.

        -----
        Zand Market
        1401 Solano Ave, Albany, CA 94706

        Super Tehran
        1112 Meadow Ln, Concord, CA

        1. re: jsxau
          Melanie Wong Feb 2, 2010 08:42 PM

          Please keep us posted on developments at Middle East Market.

          The new bakery in Sunnyvale, Yeganeh, claims to be the first in Northern California to bake this traditional bread.

          -----
          Yeganeh Bakery
          933 E Duane Ave, Sunnyvale, CA 94085

          1. re: Melanie Wong
            j
            jsxau Feb 7, 2010 01:48 PM

            THANKS sooo much. I just got home from back east and read your post and jumped in the car to drive from burlingame to sunnyvale, and it was worth it. The sangak was delicious and we had some aash. I believe it was a vegetarian aash we had that day which was delicious, full of beans, noodles, and herbs. They have a limited persian menu, just ground beef (koobideh) and chicken kabob, with rice or bread, and the soup. This market is a work in progress, it appears to have been bought out by a persian man who has a goal to make it like Wholesome Choice in Irvine, but less expensive. Fair produce, entire Sadaf and Golchin line of products. A real plus for Iranians and anyone else who likes good food.

            1. re: jsxau
              Melanie Wong Feb 7, 2010 09:43 PM

              Thanks for the report! Please keep us posted on how this place develops, I think you'll be back there before I am.

              1. re: jsxau
                s
                SteveG Dec 30, 2010 03:07 PM

                Sunnyvale Super/Yageneh Bakery is still much the same. I wish it were like Wholesome Choice in Irvine!

                I spoke with the owner a few weeks back when I ordered some Aash for dinner, they have a rotating set of about 8 classic Persian dishes. They're all listed on the menu, but they only make one or two at a time to avoid waste. Next time I'm there, I'll suggest they start a twitter feed to let people know what is available. Each of the people associated with the supermarket has a different specialty, so the "cook" varies based on what is on offer.

            2. re: jsxau
              Melanie Wong Dec 28, 2010 05:54 PM

              Any updates on availability of fresh baked sangak at Middle East Market?

              -----
              Middle East Market
              2054 San Pablo Ave, Berkeley, CA 94702

            3. b
              bigwheel042 Feb 7, 2010 11:21 PM

              I just bought a package of sangak at 22nd and Irving in SF the other day. It's whole wheat-based and scattered with sesame seeds. I think this was the only variety in stock, though they might have sold out of other varieties by the time I got there.

              The texture and flavor don't seem all that different from lavash to me. Not sure if that's to be expected or not...

              1 Reply
              1. re: bigwheel042
                Melanie Wong Feb 10, 2010 06:45 PM

                If you didn't have it fresh and hot out of the oven, I can understand why you'd feel that way. To use a more common example, think about the half life of naan after it emerges from the tandor.

                As I described in my original posting in the other thread, the aroma and texture of the freshly baked sangak made me understand why this is a Persian culinary icon. Even the day after, the bit that was left still had good flavor when reheated a bit. And the final scrap, dry and hard now, is rather cracker-like. I hope you'll have a chance to try it freshly baked some time.

              Show Hidden Posts