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Bread_what are very best places to get bread and rolls in LA and OC?

k
kel Jul 16, 2007 11:52 AM

Love to have your super bread / rolls experiences.

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  1. h
    hungrygirl106 Jul 16, 2007 12:32 PM

    If I'm going to eat bread, it's all about Bread Bar.

    www.infinitefress.blogspot.com

    4 Replies
    1. re: hungrygirl106
      d
      Diana Jul 16, 2007 12:46 PM

      I dig breadbar.

      Also good is La Brea bakery.

      1. re: Diana
        mollyomormon Jul 16, 2007 12:51 PM

        Definitley the Alpine rolls at Breadbar...

        1. re: mollyomormon
          Dommy Jul 17, 2007 09:36 AM

          Yup!! I love the dinner rolls at bread bar... but for their whole loaves... I perfer FM vendors and few other bakeries around town...

          --Domy!

      2. re: hungrygirl106
        brekkie_fan Jul 16, 2007 10:26 PM

        i saw that for the first time Saturday while in Century City. looked carbalicious!

      3. b
        budlit Jul 16, 2007 06:18 PM

        pain du jour on pico in santa monica

        1. c
          chris1621 Jul 16, 2007 06:56 PM

          La Brea Bakery is tops on my list.

          1. gaylenwaydelich Jul 16, 2007 07:45 PM

            Joseph's Bakery on 10th and Meyler in San Pedro. Old country bakery, family run and Rosalie knows everyone by name and speaks to you in English, Italian, Croatian and Spanish. The Italian loaves are always crisp and fragrant. Loaves can be purchased plain, sourdough, and whole wheat. Also carry Ischia rolls which are a soft sandwich roll used by all the local deli's. The double rolls are perfect to eat with sopressta, parma and some fresh mozzerella purchased from A1 Market. San Pedro's own 'Bay Cities'.

            Also thin crust pizza by the slice that every kid from SPHS and Mary Star were weaned on. But the very best are the morning "facturas", Italian sweet dough breakfast rolls. Rosalie and family make several varieties; regular - looks just like a croissant with a clear sweet glaze. "The round one's", that have a dollop of either chocolate or vanilla icing. "The long one's", they are an elongated croissant with a crystalized sugar crackle glaze - these seem to be everyones favorite and sell out first. There are also two filled types; one with a quince jelly filling, (I thought for years it was apple!), and the custard filled. Oh and then the cookies, although a very limited selection, not a commercial after-taste to be found. Home made lemonbars and brownies. Try the Angenetti's. Rosalie makes them in almond and lemon. I've had an inappropriate reaction to the almond angenetti's. Trust me - it's a beautiful thing.

            Also CH worthy are Baltic Bakery for Farmers Bread, and other hearty country breads. Europa bakery for seeded loaves and Ischia rolls. I guess in LA proper these breads would be referred to as 'artisan' breads and cost much more than the $1.20 per loaf / $1.50 for a 1/2 doz rolls. These old country bakers have been doing this for years and the businesses are passed down by generations. I've been eating Joseph's bakery since I can remember and I am almost 50 years old.

            In San Pedro, we are blessed to have these gifted old world artisan bakers. They would probably blush if you called them artisans because this is what they have done for several generations. It is in their blood.

            1. Das Ubergeek Jul 16, 2007 07:46 PM

              The best baguette in the city is at Cafe Eilat/Eilat Bakery -- there's one on Burbank/Whitsett (where I go), one on Fairfax and one on Pico/Beverly.

              Me, I love the limpa bread at Berolina Bakery in Glendale.

              And let's not forget the OUTSTANDING black bread at Blackjack Market on Sherman Way in NoHo.

              But then there's the ciabatta from Monte Carlo Deli in Burbank...

              ...and the injera from Merkato on Fairfax...

              ...and the lavash from Shushan in Glendale.

              Ah, bread.

              7 Replies
              1. re: Das Ubergeek
                Chowpatty Jul 16, 2007 09:40 PM

                I wonder if The Cow Jumped Over the Moon gets their baguettes at Eilat Bakery -- I was surprised at how good it was.

                1. re: Das Ubergeek
                  d
                  Diana Jul 17, 2007 06:46 AM

                  I like rahel's injera. Do you know the italian middle eastern Deli on Riverside sells Rosalind's injera? He tells me a lot of his customers like to use it with their hummous and baba ganouj. I tried it, and it was a great idea. Serve your MEzze on injera!

                  Tell me more about this lucious black bread, please!

                  1. re: Diana
                    Das Ubergeek Jul 17, 2007 07:05 AM

                    It's dark rye bread, it's sold in this completely random market (Blackjack, on Sherman Way and Bellaire, NE corner, down from Quiznos)... I don't know who makes it or if it's baked in-house (unlikely) but it is the quintessential "chorny khleb" of the Eastern European homes of my youth. Soft, chewy inside, a crust that you have to work at a bit with lots of not-quite-burnt flavour, and dense enough to stand up to the depredations of a smeared pat of butter.

                    It's usually in the racks toward the east side of the store, but sometimes it's already bagged up outside the racks. When you get to the front to pay just tell them what it is ("etta chorny khleb").

                    With a little braunschweiger... YUM.

                    1. re: Das Ubergeek
                      d
                      Diana Jul 17, 2007 07:29 AM

                      drool

                      1. re: Das Ubergeek
                        k
                        karamazov Aug 27, 2008 11:26 AM

                        Interesting, I have never seen black bread here in the states quite like what you get back home. I think the biggest difference is the moisture level - the black bread here is simply not nearly as moist as what's prepared in russia and eastern europe. I think back there it is cooked less or something, don't know much about bread making.

                        Dry bread is a problem for like 99% of bread i see sold anywhere in LA by the way. Seems like everyone likes their "rustic" loaves. Most of the stuff from La Brea bakery for example is completely inedible for me because of this.

                    2. re: Das Ubergeek
                      f
                      Frank_Santa_Monica Jul 17, 2007 09:44 AM

                      Wow. I thought I was the only one who knew about how good Cafe Elait is. It's right by Susina, right? They have great bagels too, if that's the one I'm thinking about.

                      1. re: Frank_Santa_Monica
                        Das Ubergeek Jul 17, 2007 11:09 AM

                        Sort of, yes... Susina is on Beverly and La Brea, and Eilat is on Fairfax and Beverly (and on Pico and Rexford, and on Burbank and Whitsett).

                    3. westsidegal Jul 16, 2007 07:50 PM

                      i find myself driving to la maison du pain.
                      pico blvd near hauser

                      1. q
                        quinntran Jul 16, 2007 09:05 PM

                        Cream Pan in Tustin has great bread and pastries

                        1. n
                          nosh Aug 27, 2008 10:19 AM

                          The best crusty sandwich roll in town is at Bay Cities Deli in Santa Monica. They are called "felices" on the printout label. Only 40 cents for a huge long one, less for smaller. Note that they do not last long -- if you bring them home it helps to warm briefly in the oven before slicing, otherwise you risk severe injury from a sharp knife bouncing off the resistant hard crust. A truly unique superior product -- avoid going during the lunch rush between 11:15 and 1:00 on weekdays (closed Mon) or parking can be a long and difficult wait.

                          1. Emme Aug 27, 2008 06:50 PM

                            3 Square Bakery

                            Boule is a good option.

                            La Maison du Pain on Pico

                            Celestino's

                            French Market Cafe on Abbot Kinney

                            3 Replies
                            1. re: Emme
                              n
                              nosh Aug 27, 2008 08:39 PM

                              Not exactly a bread, but the best croissant I've had in SoCal is from Amandine, on the north side of Wilshire a block and a half west of Bundy. Consistent, buttery, properly layered and crisp and excellent, and only $1.50.

                              1. re: Emme
                                Steve2 in LA Aug 27, 2008 09:22 PM

                                I'll second Boule. Went there the other day. Plain and Almond Croissants! Pain du Lait! Chocolate Brioche! Cranberry-Orange Rolls! Hallelujah!

                                1. re: Steve2 in LA
                                  Eastcoast foods nob Aug 27, 2008 11:11 PM

                                  I'll join right in for Boule. I am addicted to Hide's (Main bread guy from Japan) hand made crusty baguettes, flaky croissants and his amazing guyere bread. This has to be the best bread shop in L.A. Their caramel is also amazing and Oprah has on her O list as the best caramel ever.

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