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The Debate Over Subsidizing Snacks

Lori SF Jul 4, 2007 09:16 AM

A must read article in the New York Times-
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/04/din...

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  1. dinnerbell RE: Lori SF Jul 4, 2007 09:38 AM

    Yeah I just read this a little bit ago. The farm bill is such a clear case of public good sacrificed for the benefit of a corporate interest with very far reaching consequences and a colossal waste of resources. It's the foundation of our agro-food system, and there are very few opportunities in government to change something so fundamental to our society with a single legislative initiative. It's exciting that people are finally paying attention and demanding legislation that better serves public health, culinary interests, and family farmers. It's exciting to imagine the possibilities for greater diversity and freshness in the food supply, and new possibilities for farmers and small food business entrepreneurs, but (as the article suggests) its unlikely that proponents can overcome opposition to such broad change from agribusiness groups.

    1. w
      will_forfood RE: Lori SF Jul 4, 2007 09:58 AM

      thanks for sharing.

      1. Phood RE: Lori SF Jul 4, 2007 10:12 AM

        The April 22 NYT Magazine Section has an interesting article on the impact of the farm bill on food choices; specifically the impact of subsidized corn and soy in creating cheap and empty calories.
        As 'hounds, I've seen discussion over the years on High Fructose Corn Syrup as being a less desirable sweetener for our foods. This article proposes that HFCS and other subsidized foods are not just bad for our 'houndly palate, but bad for our national waistline.
        I read the paper version, but the link is http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/22/mag...

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        1. re: Phood
          Lori SF RE: Phood Jul 5, 2007 08:05 AM

          interesting article both of these articles have enlightened me. I have had my share of junk foods but shudder to the fact that majority of Americans eat this way on a daily basis...Not shocking but always surprising.

          I liked what dinnerbell said about the possibilities for greater diversity and freshness in the food suppy and as well as other food enterprises.. This can have a very positive outcome, would that be nice for once?

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